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Help with Turn Radius and Contact Length - Page 2

post #31 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
With this piece of gear, initiation in critical to get the best release.
Yes, and I find that PMTS rings true in this regard, as one almost always must flex to release.
post #32 of 92
I like to ride all the models. However, some seem to preform better than others.
post #33 of 92
Thread Starter 
How much thought do you put into graphics?
post #34 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
How much thought do you put into graphics?
Cosmetics. It does no good to put lipstick on a pig. OTOH, done tastefully it can really enhance your experience. I swear there is some gear out there I feel should be covered with a paper bag.
post #35 of 92
Comparing the model in this discussion to a few of the Elan 2008 options, I think the wave is sweet to the touch, but the classic lines are equally as enticing.
post #36 of 92
Chatter and noise at speed may be a problem with those specs.
post #37 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYSki View Post
Chatter and noise at speed may be a problem with those specs.

Hmmm, not much worse than unwanted chatter, but with this sidecut of 17M, I think that hold well in all conditions.
post #38 of 92
Wow, 17M! Were you planning to hotdog style on her?
That is clearly no straightline.
post #39 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
That is clearly no straightline.
I am more of a bumper. I like someone who is quick, responsive and has a good edge.
post #40 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I like someone who is quick, responsive and has a good edge.
Is that one of those "opposites attract" things?
post #41 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
Is that one of those "opposites attract" things?
Yep, I am pretty much an intravert.

I do like a "touch" of dampness too .
post #42 of 92
Dampness is all fine and well if you're into that sort of thing; but give me plenty of rebound and bounce. That's where its at. I look for something a bit more lively with plenty of flex in the tail and a bit stiffer up front.
post #43 of 92
...and one with a reasonable sized sweet spot.
post #44 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I do like a "touch" of dampness too .
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Dampness is all fine and well if you're into that sort of thing; but give me plenty of rebound and bounce. That's where its at. I look for something a bit more lively with plenty of flex in the tail and a bit stiffer up front.
I should have qualified..the dampness has more to do with mounting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
...and one with a reasonable sized sweet spot.
Plus being able to sense conditions and terrain with a playful curiocity.
post #45 of 92
in the POW....

no preturning....

just BADABING/BADABOOM....

and WHOOPEE!!
post #46 of 92
If this particular piece of equipment is partial to a forward mount, will it alter the effective edge hold?

Also, what kind of flex do you want to get out of a boot for a forward mount?
post #47 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
If this particular piece of equipment is partial to a forward mount, will it alter the effective edge hold?

Also, what kind of flex do you want to get out of a boot for a forward mount?
Excellent questions. Of course to address the issue of forward mounting we have to assess the the balance point of the skier and how their anatomical distribution might affect the kinetics of energy being applied to the tips and tails of the skis. In the case of the fairer sex (and I use the term advisedly); there is clearly a tendency for a lower center of gravity. While this is partially offset by fore and aft amenities that are better understood by photo or video analysis, and our proprioception is greatly enhanced by actually feeling for this balance point; the relationship to this to effective edge hold is largely irrelevant. While this is a mostly irreverent and curory review of the subject, Bob Barnes could probably elucidate us on this subject with much greater prosaic abilities than my humble attempt.

With regard to your second question; Boots? We don't need no stink'in boots!:
post #48 of 92
Thread Starter 
What about a "switch" stance?
post #49 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
What about a "switch" stance?
You have much to learn Grasshopper.
There is no switch stance, only switch skiing; however a much farther forward mount position is advised for switch skiing to the road.:
Please address any switch stance questions to the snowboarding forum under the heading "goofy".
post #50 of 92
I was wondering about the camber of this equipment.
which leads to another question..........
when the equipment is broken in, will it soften? Will the camber change?
If so, will the radius and contact length change?
post #51 of 92
We are always wary of the claims made of certain models. Some suggest that there will be no change in action, but differences can arise after the "break in" period. In some extreme cases, the action can change from lively and easy to roll-over to glacial almost immediately after purchase. There is no known fix for this. It is best to exchange for a different model. Unfortunately, repeated demos will not reveal this characteristic, nor will comparison with models of similar dimension.

It is clear when the equipment begins to wear out. There are measurable increases at the waist and tail. The tips and tails begin to sag. Machine tuning is no longer an option, and hand tuning does not acheive the same results as it did in the past.

There have been reports that freshening up the top sheets and repainting can breathe new life into this worn out gear, but it is best to take it in and have is professionally overhauled.

One can have the firmness in the tips restored, and the size of the tail trimmed. At this age maintenance costs begin to climb and become very high. Once the gear becomes vintage, the costs to ensure a smooth compliant ride become excessive. Even repeated hand tuning, to the point of excess, may not provide a satisfactory glide. Hot waxes should be replaced with liquids.

It is best to avoid completely stripping the bases. Be very careful when using alcohol on vintage equipment.

Caveat emptor.
post #52 of 92
OMG BigE. We are truly in the presence of a master debater!.

This level of expertise and insight is indeed rare. All Gear-Heads must bow...At least that's what trekchick said.
post #53 of 92
A lot has been said about this equipment but no one has asked about the statistics of the athlete performing on said equipment, and if the height and weight, and skills will play a factor in the performance of said equipment
post #54 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
A lot has been said about this equipment but no one has asked about the statistics of the athlete performing on said equipment, and if the height and weight, and skills will play a factor in the performance of said equipment
The above are very important stats, but can be over looked. Proper pole size is crucial.
post #55 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
The above very important stats, but can be over looked. Proper pole size is crucial.

...also knowing how to use it.

Some guys get poles that they can't use, then cut the bottom inch off it - and they still don't have a clue.
You get a pole, and you don't modify it, unless you're weirdly into small, desensitised things...
post #56 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Example: If a woman is 5'6" 36"/25"/38" what is her turn radius and contact length? Also what kind of conditions and terrain would said shape be good for?

The terrain said shape would be most enjoyable in would be a sealy, or simmons.. Also the livingrom couch. It is best to keep out of the kitchen as this terrain can have adverse effect on the dimensions, namely the waist. They have the tendency to expand.


Would a tail that is wider than the ti....tips make her unstable at speed or varied conditions? What besides a turkey could she carve?
Also buyer beware! A lot of times what you think you are getting is something thin waisted, racey and fun to ride and what you really get is a something that quickly changes and stops being fun as soon as you commit to giving up the rest of your quiver!

Long live the quiver!!
post #57 of 92
It has been recently noted in another thread that some equipment changes in performance after it has been around for a while. I am assuming that this has to do with flexibility. How does flexibility impact the TR and need for additional gear in the Quiver?
post #58 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Example: If a woman is 5'6" 36"/25"/38" what is her turn radius and contact length? Also what kind of conditions and terrain would said shape be good for?
This thead is useless without pictures.....
post #59 of 92
I can't believe I've missed this thread and posted so much in the "I'm a level 8.735 ski god" thread instead.
post #60 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
I can't believe I've missed this thread and posted so much in the "I'm a level 8.735 ski god" thread instead.
Its a toss up which is more entertaining, but I think this one has more potential for creativity.
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