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Getting to Jackson Hole

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
How does one get to Jackson Hole via commercial air travel.

I don't have a map......do you fly into an airport and then shuttle?? If so, what are the distances??

Thanks.
post #2 of 26
Not sure what your question is. Can you fly by commercial airline to JH? Yes, United and United Express (through Denver) and Delta (through SLC) both serve JH. Or are you asking how you get from the airport to JH? There are taxis, or a shuttle service (Alltrans) that operate. Its about 10 miles to JH, and 25 to Teton Village (and you will get to travel through JH to Teton village unless it is summer as there is no direct road).

Mike
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
Not sure what your question is. Can you fly by commercial airline to JH? Yes, United and United Express (through Denver) and Delta (through SLC) both serve JH. Or are you asking how you get from the airport to JH? There are taxis, or a shuttle service (Alltrans) that operate. Its about 10 miles to JH, and 25 to Teton Village (and you will get to travel through JH to Teton village unless it is summer as there is no direct road).

Mike
Good answer, Mike. All the above is exactly true.

Your post brings up a common misconception about Jackson and Jackson Hole, however. I'm not saying *you* have the misconception, but many people do.

Jackson HOLE is the general term for our great big huge valley. Jackson is the name of the main town that sits at the southern end of the valley.

Many first-time visitors drive into the town of JACKSON and start asking the locals where Jackson HOLE is.

The term is a relic of the old trapper/trader days in the 1800's. A "hole" was a large valley where people would "hole up" for the winter. It's also where the elk and deer would winter, so that's where more food was available than up in the more harsh mountains. Jackson's Hole was ours (named after trapper/explorer Davey Jackson). Pierre's Hole was the valley that Driggs and Victor are now in on the other side of the Tetons from us. There are many other "Holes" around the northern Rockies.

Sorry for the interruption. Nit-picky history lesson concluded.
post #4 of 26
Sorry Bob, I knew the difference, but failed to make it clear. Hope you are enjoying the fishing -- or are you getting a few turns in on the Pass?

Mike
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sorry for the confusion. And thanks for the claification.

So, one can fly in to Jackson and the base of the mountain is about 25 miles. Correct?? This is Teton Village?? Now, Grand Targhee is one of the nearby ski areas. Is Snow King the name of the ski area that many refer to as Jackson Hole?? Is Snow King the mountain getting the new tram??

I know, I am proving my ignorance here for all to see.

Thanks and there will be more questions to follow.
post #6 of 26
Sugaree -
Here's a cool feature you may never have noticed.
At the top of any EpicSki page, click the "Travel" tab.
On the page that comes up, click "Resort Guide" and then under that "Wyoming."

THere is info on each area, and if you drill down, links to their home pages.

The short answers - the Tram is at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort -- Teton Village is its base village.

Snow King is the "town" mountain. Back East it would probably be a destination on its own.
Grand Targhee is reasonably close - there are bus+lift packages from Jackson or TV. I don't know a lot about GT, actually, except that a lot of people who are on vacation do one day over there to mix things up.

The JHMR website has good info on air travel. Connections are quite good. If you are buying your ticket, it tends to be a little more than Denver or SLC, but if using Frequent Flyer miles its all the same.
post #7 of 26
http://www.jacksonhole.com/info/faq.history.dates.asp

http://www.jacksonhole.com/info/gh.index.asp

http://www.jacksonhole.com/info/maps.asp

Sugaree,

The links above will take you to the Jackson Hole web site. If you click around a bit I think you'll find the information you are looking for.

BTW, Bob Peters is the resident Jackson Hole expert.
post #8 of 26
Maybe this will help. As you can see the airport is directly across the valley from the JHMR but no direct road.

Years ago the all powerful Jackson Hole Chamber and the resort plus my friends that lived in Kelly that worked at Teton Village wanted to build a road with bridge over the Snake River directly to the resort from the airport, about 8 miles, instead of driving thru town and going around. It was a no go.

post #9 of 26
I did the same thing. I drove into Jackson looked at snowking and thought thats palce is steep but where the hell is jackson hole. Or as the local say Teton Village.
post #10 of 26
... and Snow King has night skiing.
It's a good thing I didn't have a rental car, or I'd have been tempted to do something insane after a full day at JHMR.
post #11 of 26
I thought I'd take the excellent map that jhrefugee posted and add a few lines. Maybe this will help out a little.

1. The circle in yellow encompasses about half of "Jackson Hole". The entire "Hole" extends another 40 miles or so to the north (right in this photo), nearly to Yellowstone National Park.

2. The green line with arrows runs from the Jackson Hole airport (which lies inside Grand Teton National Park) through the town of Jackson (marked in red), west across the Snake River bridge, and then north to Teton Village (with the X), which is where the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort is. The Jackson Hole Mountain Resort at Teton Village is the "big" destination ski area.

3. The blue line shows the highway route if you are going to Grand Targhee ski area. You go over Teton Pass, then through Victor and Driggs, Idaho, then back east and up the mountain to Grand Targhee.

4. The little "i" that is shown next to the town of Jackson and marked in red is Snow King Ski Resort. Snow King rises right straight up from the edge of the town of Jackson.



We use a lot of shorthand here in Jackson Hole. Here are some of the main terms:

"The Village": Teton Village and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

"Town": The town of Jackson.

"The Pass": Teton Pass.

"The 'Ghee": Grand Targhee Ski Resort.

"The King": Snow King Ski Resort.

"The Park": Grand Teton National Park or Yellowstone National Park, depending on the intent of the speaker (sometimes you have to be a mindreader ).

"Moose": The tiny little settlement that is the main entrance to Grand Teton National Park.

"Wilson": The little town that lies right at the bottom of the Jackson Hole side of Teton Pass. Wilson is the site of several landmark businesses in Jackson Hole; Nora's Restaurant (a breakfast institution), the Stagecoach Bar (THE place to be on Sunday nights), Wilson Backcountry Sports (unofficial backcountry skiing shop for Jackson Hole), and Pearl Street Bagels (great bagel/coffee shop).

"The Aspens": the Jackson Hole Racquet Club resort, about four miles south of Teton Village. Many condos, a couple of restaurants, Starbucks, a liquor store, market, etc.

There. Now anybody can visit Jackson Hole and sound like a local.
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
Holy cow. Now I know why I asked the question!! A lot to decipher!!

Bob, if a buddy and I choose to visit next year.....is the mountain well serviced without the tram??

Thanks for the layout everyone!
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugaree View Post

Bob, if a buddy and I choose to visit next year.....is the mountain well serviced without the tram??
Don't tell anybody, but the mountain skied better this year than it has in ten years. While half the skiers were up yo-yo-ing Rendezvous Bowl on the new East Ridge chair, some of us were skiing the Lower Faces in almost complete solitude.

It was great!

I almost wish they wouldn't build a new tram. :
post #14 of 26
How long were those lower faces skiable this year? I assume they burned off in the warm March because the JHMR website was reporting only 68% open starting around mid-March. January was a lean snow month in most of the West this season too. How was the skiing then? JHMR season overall snowfall was only 70% of normal. I was quite surprised to see the press release recording 2nd highest total skier visits of 402,000.

I'd appreciate Bob's further local insights on this season at JHMR.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
How long were those lower faces skiable this year? I assume they burned off in the warm March because the JHMR website was reporting only 68% open starting around mid-March. January was a lean snow month in most of the West this season too. How was the skiing then? JHMR season overall snowfall was only 70% of normal. I was quite surprised to see the press release recording 2nd highest total skier visits of 402,000.

I'd appreciate Bob's further local insights on this season at JHMR.
Hi, Tony.

It was a strange spring for the Lower Faces.

Because we had a considerably lower snowpack than "normal", coverage on the lower part of the mountain was thin. Where that really came into play was as it started warming in March; the more southerly aspects of the Hobacks and the Lower Faces really never got a heavy enough snowfall to totally cover all the brush. That brush really absorbs warmth as the sun starts to shine, so most of the south-facing aspects just totally melted out by about the third week of March.

The more northerly aspects on the lower part of the mountain, however, didn't do that. Those aspects had good cover and actually set up some really great corn skiing during that sunny period. We were skiing absolutely great lines down the skier's-left sides of Sublette Ridge, South Colter, Buffalo Bowl, North Colter, and North Hoback. The issue was that the ski patrol was closing the Hobacks and Lower Faces around 1:00pm each day because things were getting too soft. That's why they were reporting the 68% thing.

We also were skiing really, really good sidecountry out-of-bounds in Rock Springs and Green River bowls. We'd lap all the way up to the top on the various lifts, bop out the gate at the top of Rendezvous Bowl, and then ski great snow all the way down to where you come back inbounds at the bottom of South Hoback. It was just outstanding skiing and nobody was doing it.

By the last week of our season, however, the lowest part of the Hobacks was shot and they closed the Union Pass chair. Our season stayed open a week later than "normal" this year, however, so the net result was a bonus.

As to the second-highest skier days ever, that was an interesting statistic. With the added capacity on the Gondola and the Thunder chair plus the addition of the East Ridge chair, I almost never saw what I would consider a significant liftline. My own experience was - as I said earlier in this thread - that the mountain "felt" much less crowded than in previous years. We did have a HUGE number of beginner skiers this winter, which was borne out by the land rush business that was done by the Ski School.
post #16 of 26
While we're on the topic of Jackson Hole, I'm going to post this little synopsis of some of the lodging choices in the area. I get asked this question a lot in PM's, so maybe putting this out here will help some people out a little.

I have to say, though, that I'm really terrible about lodging here. I've only stayed in a few places and I don't really have a good handle on value versus amenities versus convenience, etc.

The accomodations are "generally" cheaper in the town of Jackson than at the main ski resort at Teton Village. The cheapest places I know about are the Super 8 and the hostel section of the Anvil Hotel . Both are in the town of Jackson. Also in town, my wife feels that the Wagon Wheel Village offers a very good combination of rooms, location, shuttles, etc.

At Teton Village, the least expensive is the Hostelx .

The most expensive is the Four Seasons Jackson Hole . I'll just add that the Four Seasons has been judged the finest ski resort hotel in America.

The two main property management companies in Jackson Hole also offer condominium and home rentals and occasionally have some great packages.

Jackson Hole Resort Lodging

Rendezvous Mountain Rentals

These are just a few of the literally hundreds of lodging choices in Jackson Hole. the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce has links to many, many more possibilities.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
At Teton Village, the least expensive is the Hostelx

It's also the only place in Teton Village with free parking.

It's closest to the Mangy Moose.

It allows dogs if you want to split your skiing between riding
lifts at Jackson and hiking the pass.
post #18 of 26
Great job Bob! I thought about mentioning that if you rented a car at the airport you could go by way of the golf course thru Spring Gulch and avoid
Jackson but I thought it's probably good to drive thru, get ones bearing on where the Cowboy, Rancher, Billy's Burger, large grocery store, Bubba's,,,

Kinda bummed to hear Anthony's closed.
post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info guys. Good stuff.

Hope to use it next year.
post #20 of 26
"As to the second-highest skier days ever, that was an interesting statistic. With the added capacity on the Gondola and the Thunder chair plus the addition of the East Ridge chair, I almost never saw what I would consider a significant lift line. My own experience was - as I said earlier in this thread - that the mountain "felt" much less crowded than in previous years. We did have a HUGE number of beginner skiers this winter, which was borne out by the land rush business that was done by the Ski School."


I got in 12 days at "the Village" this year and I'm sure my longest lift wait was about 10 to 12 minutes at Sublett chair. The odd thing was the wait was due to a "no singles rule" due to high winds, my wait was caused by no one else to ride up with, so I just stood there watching empty chairs go by while I visited with the lifty. The next day was my best day of the season, still nobody around and everything smooth, wind blown, firm but very soft, toilet bowl was spectacular, and I had it to myself.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHrefugee View Post
Kinda bummed to hear Anthony's closed.
Say it isn't so!!! Giant plates of great pasta for sweet prices... it was my carb load fave prior to forays up Teton Pass.

I'm sure insane downtown rent drove them under.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoback Hank View Post
Say it isn't so!!! Giant plates of great pasta for sweet prices... it was my carb load fave prior to forays up Teton Pass.

I'm sure insane downtown rent drove them under.
Hank, I'm afraid it is so.

I don't think it's the rent, though, because Tony owned the building. I think it has a bit more to do with 25+ years of serving meals every night. I think he just sort of got tired of doing it.

The contractors are hard at work remodling the building. I believe it'll all be an art gallery by this winter.

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
The most expensive is the Four Seasons Jackson Hole . I'll just add that the Four Seasons has been judged the finest ski resort hotel in America.
At this point I'm more of a Snake River Lodge fan (which Bob pointed me to a few years back). The Four Seasons has nicer beds and decor - but seems clueless about dealing with people who actually want to ski. In my experience the Four Seasons ski concierge was beyond hopeless. Overall, the SRL was much more in tune with guests who were there for the skiing.

My family has stayed at each place at least 3 times in the past few years - but we did not visit Jackson this past season, so it is possible that the Four Seasons has upped its game wrt to people who ski rather than just want to get pampered and say they stayed at a Four Seasons.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
At this point I'm more of a Snake River Lodge fan (which Bob pointed me to a few years back). The Four Seasons has nicer beds and decor - but seems clueless about dealing with people who actually want to ski. In my experience the Four Seasons ski concierge was beyond hopeless. Overall, the SRL was much more in tune with guests who were there for the skiing.

My family has stayed at each place at least 3 times in the past few years - but we did not visit Jackson this past season, so it is possible that the Four Seasons has upped its game wrt to people who ski rather than just want to get pampered and say they stayed at a Four Seasons.
Spin:

I know your experience at the FS wasn't the greatest.

I think they've improved pretty substantially since you were there. I'm hearing uniformly excellent reviews recently.

And (while I know you and Cloudpeak aren't necessarily into it) for anyone who REALLY wants pampering, the JH Four Seasons now has a club room that takes the concept of ski-in/ski-out to a level I couldn't even imagine before I saw it.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
... for anyone who REALLY wants pampering, the JH Four Seasons now has a club room that takes the concept of ski-in/ski-out to a level I couldn't even imagine before I saw it.
Now you've set my imagination loose! Does it involve a snowy ramp that lets you ski inside and directly to the bar where a team of eager employees remove the skis from your feet while the bartender fills you a pint of a nice fresh microbrew???????? If it ain't that good, then you've oversold it!!!! Let's hear about it! Unless, of course, they'd have to kill you...
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Now you've set my imagination loose! Does it involve a snowy ramp that lets you ski inside and directly to the bar where a team of eager employees remove the skis from your feet while the bartender fills you a pint of a nice fresh microbrew???????? If it ain't that good, then you've oversold it!!!! Let's hear about it! Unless, of course, they'd have to kill you...
I guess it's not quite THAT upscale. You do still have to take off your skis.

The club consists of a large, key-carded area just off the hallway from what you might remember as the Ski Concierge. There are very nicely-appointed individual lockers, rest rooms, showers, big-screen TV's, internet hookups and printers/faxes... AND A PRIVATE BAR WITH ALL KINDS OF SNACKS.

You leave your boots on dryers in the club room and there's a dedicated staff person who gets your skis when you're ready to go out. Compared to the rest of my little oyster-confined experience, it's pretty darn plush.

I'm not sure, but I think the upfront cost is around $60,000. (That doesn't include the quarterly dues, of course.)
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