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Where I ski, should I have a second ski?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I am a guy who lives in Columbus, Ohio and love to ski. I don't have the money to go west 2-5 times a year yet. I usually ski in western NY (Holiday Valley is our favorite with others as well), Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio.

We are thinking about heading East but think for a few extra dollars we could go out West.

I do not ski bumps or pipes. I am not a trick ski guy or extreme skier. I am a high intermediate and want to constantly improve. I have a brand new pair of Fisher AMC 76 in 170 cm. that I love. It takes care of most of the off piste (5% max) that I do where I ski.

My question is; given where we ski now combined with wanting and hoping to go out west, could I benefit from adding another ski to the arsenal, and if so, which one and why?

Thanks so much in advance.

PJS
post #2 of 23
Save the money for a trip out west.
post #3 of 23
You always need another pair of skis. The way I see it, you'd benefit from both a smaller SL ski (to have more fun in the midwest/midatlantic) and a bigger allmountain ski (to have more fun everywhere, including out west) while still having two pairs of skis that you'll use regularly. Just keep in mind, once you take the plunge from one ski to a quiver, it'll never end.

Some suggestions:

SL carver:
Fischer RX8
Elan SLX Fusion
Head Supershape

Allmountain ski:
Dynastar 8800
Volkl Karma
K2 Public Enemy
post #4 of 23
Based on the details you provided, I think the skis you have will do fine for a couple of years at least, depending on how often you ski and how fast you improve. Wider skis would be better in powder over 8" deep but, unless the powder is light, you probably aren't ready for that yet. Narrower skis would be faster edge to edge but you probably wouldn't take advantage of that yet either. Lastly, traveling with more than one pair of skis is a hassle. If you want to spend money on skiing, you could buy lessons.

The skis you have are very good and versatile skis. Stick with them and in a couple of years if you think you might want another pair, by then you might have a better idea of what you would want different and why.

dt
post #5 of 23
If you're posting here because you want a sensible response, you've come to the wrong place. If you're posting here because you want help picking out a second set of skis to begin your journey to a full quiver, well........you've come to the right place.

Lets define need and NEED!
post #6 of 23

Where I ski, should I have a second ski?

Almost everybody needs two skis unless they are on a mono
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
If you're posting here because you want a sensible response, you've come to the wrong place. If you're posting here because you want help picking out a second set of skis to begin your journey to a full quiver, well........you've come to the right place.

Lets define need and NEED!
X2
post #8 of 23
This is new...I agree with PhilT. Columbus is far from any skiing but close to an airport that includes SouthWest Airlines and others who can get you to the West. If the choice is between skiing and a ski, take the skiing. The hardest thing to do when you live in Columbus is to keep the participation at a high and exciting level. If you have $500 or so, commit it to a trip. If you are tempted to spend it on a BBQ grill, get some skis. I think you'd find the 174 Atomic Snoop Daddy (88 mm waist) would give you what you are looking for in terms of diversity.
post #9 of 23
To quote a great philosopher (see this thread http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=55097):

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
What are you crazy? The correct number of skis in a quiver is Q=(n+1), where n= the number of skis you have now. Recalculate after each new ski.
So my bottom line is OR COURSE you need a second ski.

As to which second ski, I'd think first about a shorter SL ski for the icey home front; not a wider allmountain / soft snow ski as suggested above. You'd probably spend less and get more day-to-day use from it.

I ski in the east, a lot of small local hills, with occasional trips out west and to bigger hills up in northern VT, NY, QC. The two skis I use most are a pair of Fischer Big Stix 7.6 - predecessor to your AMC 76 but slightly longer radius - and a short slalom ski. On the SL front I've had several over the years, trashed or traded them, ranging from 156 to 165 cm, shorter=race stock and longer = rec slaloms. These are cheap to pick up at swaps or ebay; I bet on ebay right now you could find several in the $100 - $250 range, with 1 - 2 yrs use on the skis (e.g, volkl p50SL; Rossi 9S or VS oversize; Dynastar Omecarve 9 or 10; Salomon Equipe 10 SC; any Fischer slalom). They're a lot of fun to use on icey eastern slopes, they'll reward (if not force) good form, and you get more fun on shorter slopes due to shorter radius.

I agree travelling with one pair is a lot easier but if and when you head west, your AMC 76 should be just fine as an all-around all mountain ski for virtually all but bottomless powder. 76 mm underfoot is decent float unless you're real heavy and when I switch to it after skiing a 63mm carving ski it feels like a real advantage in softer conditions. And if you get lucky out west and there's just too much snow for 76 mm then rent a fattie for a day or two.

Definitely agree though, save some $$ for travel. The thing is if ski no. 2 = cheapo SL, you'll have that much more for travel $$, you'll get more out of your skiing at home, and you won't pay big dollars for current 80+mm skis that in reality won't do that much more than your current Fischers.
post #10 of 23
I generally agree with Phil and CR, but would add that if you are going to be heading out West, you'd probably be happy pairing the AMC 76 (a good stiff ski on the narrow/East side of midfat) with a softer ski with a waist in the range from, say, 88mm to 100mm.

If you find a closeout deal or a good deal on a used pair, by all means, go for it. SierraJim has 176 Dynastar Big Troubles for $362.50. And these Karmas or Scratch FS might fit your needs. Keep an eye out and you might find a bargain, like the Fischer Big Stix 84s I picked up earlier this season as a trade for a bottle of bourbon.

But unless you get a proverbial offer you can't refuse, why not demo for a day or two on your trip out West?
post #11 of 23
I have a pair of 177 Karmas mounted for 305mm boot w/ Rossi Axial2 Ti bindings that I want to unload...(btw, the 177 skis short, so it might be up your alley if you're already riding a 170).

food for thought...

post #12 of 23
I think the only person who can really answer whether a new ski is truely worth it is you.
Having said that, if you do want a second ski, I would also recommend geting a slalom type ski. On a smaller hill especially, they can really be a lot of fun. If you're looking to move to a higher level they're also great help - they really benefit from and in some cases, force you to use modern technique.

A few models to look at:
Head i.Supershape
Rossignol 9S or VS Oversize (same ski, different model years)
Atomic ST:11

there are several others that you'd probably be served well by too. Post some more information on your size and ability, and how you ski and we can give you more specific suggestions.
post #13 of 23
Get the slalom ski. They can turn those boring littlle hills (I grew up on them) into a roller coaster ride.
post #14 of 23
I am all for buying more skis, but from your description, the AMC76 is going to cover most of what you want to do. I have a similar ski (Elan Mag12), and it really is the ski I use most of the time. I have a quiver built around that, with a carver for hard groomed snow (Fischer RX-8) and a wider ski (K2 PE) for powder and soft snow, but the Mag 12 is my go-to ski. I think the same would be true of your AMC76. If you suddenly feel that the AMCs are not floating enough in powder, get something wider, and if you feel they are not fun enough or railing enough on hardpack, get a carver. But for the usage you've described, you already have the right kind of ski.

Now, if you have money burning a hole in your pocket and just want to buy skis, then I say go for it and welcome to the club!
post #15 of 23
now you see, there's two schools: the make do with what you've got and the add more all the time.

i can honestly say that it all depends on where you ski MOST of the time and how well you ski.

For example, I have an active quiver of 6 skis, but am in the process of switching out 2 pairs. I basically rode the Mantra and King Salmon (swapped the KS for the Mantra) most of the season with short bursts on a No Ka Oi and the Karma. I also got in a few days on a Spatula when it dumped.

That said, my King Salmon has become my go-to ski and I've reconfigured the quiver with a Titan 9 (to replace the Karma).

But this is all immaterial, really. I got the buying skis jones bad last season after not having had new equipment for 20 years.

Since then I've ridden with a slew of Bears and am beginning to see the error of my ways. You really don't NEED more than 2, maybe three skis at most and this all depends on where you ride the most.

Uncle Louie, who organized the LGC event, admitted to me that he only has 2 skis in his quiver. The Apache Crossfire and an RX9 (I believe, though it could be the 8, I don't know race skis that well). He was seriously ripping up the variable snow conditions in Colo last week on the Crossfire, which I consider to be a skinny ski. He said he only breaks out the RX for supreme ice/boiler plate. That's his quiver. And he's a damn fine skier. A number of the other folks I rode with in Colo only had 1 or 2 skis in their quiver, mostly in the low-to-mid 70 and low-to-mid 80mm waisted range.

I think the wise thing to do is save the money for a trip. If you start doing more out-of-state skiing then adding another ski to your quiver will be duly justified. If you're mostly gonna ski the EC and MAYBE (not definitely) make a trip out West, then just demo. It will save you money, time, and the agony of not being able to make up your mind about which ski to buy.

I went through all of that last season and this season have realized the error of my ways. I've toned the quiver down and am now stuck with 4 pairs of skis to try and sell off!

I'd err on the side of conservatism until you really start cranking out days on the hill and truly become committed to doing at least 1, maybe two major trips out of state a year.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Get the slalom ski. They can turn those boring littlle hills (I grew up on them) into a roller coaster ride.
Omygosh! I had a blast on my Race Tigers on the little 400 ft vert hill near my house. The rollers in the terrain made for nice little air pops and some phenomenal WHOO HOOOO! days!!!!!
post #17 of 23
My advise -- Before you buy:

1. Take a trip west a time or two to get a feel for the snow and terrain that you want to spend your time skiing.
2. Demo various skis. Try some wider ones (especially if you get new snow) and some with a turn radius of less than 13 m. This will give you a feel for what you are missing by only owning one pair.
3. Keep reading all the opinions on the various threads about skiis.
Then, you can make a more educated decision what type of ski will fit your style.
4. Remember that many of the areas in the West do not groom a whole lot, so a wider ski might be the next logical step for you.

I ski mostly in Minnesota and ski a pair of Volkl 6 stars with a 13 M turn radius. These provide great entertainment on our short local hills. I also own a pair of Volkl Explosives with a 95 mm waist for my occasional trip out west and if we get a storm in Minnesota (Got them cheap).
post #18 of 23
I always use two skis!

I do think there is a lot to be said for having a short radius pair of skis for slow speeds and a long radius ski for high speeds.

If you ski hard and soft snow then there is also a good reason to match soft and stiff skis to conditions.


It's not really a question of NEED, more of a question of want. You can get a compromise pair of skis, but they're like an all-season set of tires.
post #19 of 23
As many others have said, put the money towards trips out west. And if you feel the need to ski something other than your current ski, then rent some demos. Most places you can rent demo skis for less than $30/day. So if you have extra money to put towards new skis, I would put it in my trip fund and just rent when you're out there if you feel the need.
post #20 of 23
What I think is the main thing people are missing is he said he does NOT have extra money sitting around. He said he cant afford to go skiing out west which he would like to do. Almost all skis will ski in every condition just some do better than others. If he has spare money he should put it towards skiing. Lets keep our prioritys straight, gear whoring is fun but it aint **** next actual skiing.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
What I think is the main thing people are missing is he said he does NOT have extra money sitting around. He said he cant afford to go skiing out west which he would like to do. Almost all skis will ski in every condition just some do better than others. If he has spare money he should put it towards skiing. Lets keep our prioritys straight, gear whoring is fun but it aint **** next actual skiing.
Absolutely correct!
I picked up a pair of $100 dollar bargain-bin 4 or 5 year old McGs that would make you very happy skiing just about anything. Granted they don't have the ice hold of race skis or the stability of SG skis, but you can still ski them pretty hard and have a blast doing it.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
If you're posting here because you want a sensible response, you've come to the wrong place. If you're posting here because you want help picking out a second set of skis to begin your journey to a full quiver, well........you've come to the right place.

Lets define need and NEED!
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
What I think is the main thing people are missing is he said he does NOT have extra money sitting around. He said he cant afford to go skiing out west which he would like to do. Almost all skis will ski in every condition just some do better than others. If he has spare money he should put it towards skiing. Lets keep our prioritys straight, gear whoring is fun but it aint **** next actual skiing.
Maybe you missed my reply
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
What I think is the main thing people are missing is he said he does NOT have extra money sitting around. He said he cant afford to go skiing out west which he would like to do. Almost all skis will ski in every condition just some do better than others. If he has spare money he should put it towards skiing. Lets keep our prioritys straight, gear whoring is fun but it aint **** next actual skiing.
I gotta agree. Skip the skis for now, and even if you still can't afford a trip out west, take the cash you do have and get a few more days in, if you can.
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