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Recruiting New Patrollers - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by maximusnt View Post
As an aside to all this, I'm a patroller in Ontario. There's been some talk with GF of moving to southern Connecticut, and I'd love to continue patrolling. I emailed a number of patrol directors, and didn't get any reply. The NSP site didn't really list a "clearinghouse" for patrol info or contact, nor provide a great idea of where all the resorts were.

If anyone in CT is looking for patrollers though, please get in touch with me. I've got 8 years on the patrol, I ski and snowboard, and have current BTLS and Paeds-BTLS along with my CSPS certs.


maximusnt@hotmail.com
You have seen that Hunter is looking for people, because if you ever ski there on a weekend, you'll know why. It's a great mountain filed with some of the worst human beings in the world on a weekend. I could tell you about the 3 specific incidents that helped me form this opinion, but it would change the post drastically. Basically, a significant number of obnoxious punks from NYC flock there and create havoc. Definately wear body armour, and bring a lock for your skis. It is a great mountain, but hit it during the week. Windham is near 'Hunta' and has a better crowd, especially if you're from Canada, where most people are polite!

Just my 2 cents, that probably aren't worth that.
post #32 of 39
Catskills, you might want to try a little marketing research to help you determine how to find new patrollers.

Ask your existing patrollers a few questions, like "how did you first hear about joining the patrol?" "Why did you join the patrol?" "What do you like best about patrolling?" "What don't you like about patrolling?" "Why do you continue patrolling?" "What are your favorite perks?" "What perks would you like to see?"

You also might want to ask people who've LEFT your patrol the same set of questions, including the obvious one, "Why did you leave?"

Asking these kinds of questions would likely provide valuable information that can give you a good idea of what to do to recruit not only bodies to your patrol, but the kinds of bodies that turn into patrollers you really want to keep.
post #33 of 39
However you reach your potentials, invite them to shadow.
post #34 of 39
I expressed an interest in becoming a patroller several years ago. After a few emails in the beginning nobody followed up. And it not easy to find some one to talk to about how you become a patroller. That could be the problem. You have an all volunteer organization in the east, or you have the professionals out west, but nothing like a professional management to market your organization, provide regular training classes, etc. It's run like a medieval guild at every ski area.
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
I expressed an interest in becoming a patroller several years ago. After a few emails in the beginning nobody followed up. And it not easy to find some one to talk to about how you become a patroller. That could be the problem. You have an all volunteer organization in the east, or you have the professionals out west, but nothing like a professional management to market your organization, provide regular training classes, etc. It's run like a medieval guild at every ski area.
Sorry, VK, my fault. We're fat, and not taking anyone who isn't both medical and a good skier. Right now, we're only taking EMT's who can challenge OEC and can ski. Next year that may change.
post #36 of 39
I have excellent skiing skills, and I'm a former lab tech who could start IV's in veins that doc's couldn't hit. Used to be a lifeguard/ WSIT, so I also had CPR, backboard, etc. skills.

To get back to the original post, I think the problem with getting people to join the National Ski Patrol is that you don't want people to join.

Most of the patrollers I have run into out West seem to be trained by Disney in guest relations. They sure don't want to flag the millionaire stockbroker who has the 2d bottle of wine for lunch at mid Vail. I don't think they will pull a pass unless someone actually gets hurt first.

PS. I have seen so many poor skiers with patrol jackets that it is not even funny.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
I have excellent skiing skills, and I'm a former lab tech who could start IV's in veins that doc's couldn't hit. Used to be a lifeguard/ WSIT, so I also had CPR, backboard, etc. skills.
.
Thar's great, I couldn't. Luckily, that's not a skill that I need.
I think its shortsighted, but they're current position is we don't need anyone unless fully quaified. I met a PA, EMT 20 something snowboader last week that they refused to pursue because she didn't have a house at Hunter....
in 2 years, they may be begging you to join
post #38 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
I met a PA, EMT 20 something snowboader last week that they refused to pursue because she didn't have a house at Hunter....
in 2 years, they may be begging you to join
If one ski area turns you down for ski patrolling position, do not stop there. There are always other patrols that may be desperate for new patrollers. For example if Hunter turns you down there is always Windham, Belleayre, Plattekill, Mt Peter, Catamount, and many others. Just because one ski area turns you away for a position on their ski patrol don't stop looking. It takes a few years to become a ski patrollers. There is a lot to learn. The ski patrol that is going to teach a newbie the ropes is going to invest a lot of resources in teaching that new candidate.
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
If one ski area turns you down for ski patrolling position, do not stop there. There are always other patrols that may be desperate for new patrollers. For example if Hunter turns you down there is always Windham, Belleayre, Plattekill, Mt Peter, Catamount, and many others. Just because one ski area turns you away for a position on their ski patrol don't stop looking. It takes a few years to become a ski patrollers. There is a lot to learn. The ski patrol that is going to teach a newbie the ropes is going to invest a lot of resources in teaching that new candidate.
It is a shame though to see willing, able volunteers turned away. At our area, if you want to patrol, and you demonstrate the appropriate dedication, commitment and compentence, we'll find something for you to do, no matter how flush we may be.
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