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MA request (video inside)

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I run a request for MA on this video in the instructor forum and got some great postings but not nearly as many as I had hoped for. Anyway, I would like to hear what you guys here in the racing department have to say of my short video filmed by my 9y old son this winter. Im a 44y instructor with 15y of teaching behind me and gave up racing 25y ago. I started to run gates last year and now Im completely hooked on it. Here in this video my intent is to stay low and let my legs extend out to into the turn and to flex through the transition. I try to keep my body as stable as possible and work with my legs. I pretend that I run gates.

2007 (Blizzard Mag SL)
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...nt&ID=7880F7+0

2006 (here Im last year as a ref, skis Head iSL RD)
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...nt&ID=3C443B44

Thanks
post #2 of 23
Your low flexed tranny is smooth and stable. I liked almost everything. Take a look at your outside hand postion. If you were to bring that appendage inward toward the turn it would make that outside hip come around faster with a very powerful/balanced stance. Try it, what do have to lose.
post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Take a look at your outside hand postion. If you were to bring that appendage inward toward the turn it would make that outside hip come around faster with a very powerful/balanced stance. Try it, what do have to lose.
Can you elaborate a bit on this? Why do you want to drive the outside of the body into the turn?
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks max and slider for posting. Great frozen frame slider, thank you very much, I actually look pritty good if I may say so myselfe . Thanks also for your good words on my skiing. I think I have made a lot of progress trying out a new consept this year.

Yeah, why do I want my hips to come arround quicker? Wouldent that make edge hold less effective and cause banking and ski tails to skidd? Or can I drive my hip forward without such things happening? Your remark of my outside arm position is also very interesting. From a free skiing perspective I would not make a big deal of it but since this is SL skiing and I need to clear the gate I would have to move my arm inwards approx sholder height direct abowe my knee. Would this be approximatly the right place to drive that arm? Here is a photo sequenze of Rocca for reference. He brings his outside arm forward for the transition and aims it low at first but then lifts it up for efficient gate clearing.

http://www.ronlemaster.com/images/20...005-sl-1c.html

I have tried to minimize body movements and dropped the pole plant out of my so called carving. Maybe now is the time to bring that back into the pickture? It allmost looks like Rocca is performing a double pole plant.

Over time I have developped a technique to use my outside arm to tighten up angulation by bringing it down towards my outside ski boot. By driving my arm forwards from this position I get a very powerful upward motion and I can easily make my transition in the air. Maybe you can make something out of this little clip from last year:
http://sports.topeverything.com/defa...tent&ID=63B6AA

And yes, Im going to try whatever you guys suggest but not untill next year, we have an early spring and all snow is gone .
post #5 of 23
Look at Rocca's outside hand postion from frame 1 to frame 3. That's what I'm talking about.
Man that guy can get some serious edge angles. Yes in frame 4 he rasies it for blocking the gate.

Over time I have developped a technique to use my outside arm to tighten up angulation by bringing it down towards my outside ski boot.

That's kind of what I was driving at. Perhaps instead of towards your boot try into your turn too.

Very nice skiing tdk6. We are still skiing here so I'll try and get some video and you can have a shot at me.
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Look at Rocca's outside hand postion from frame 1 to frame 3. That's what I'm talking about.
I think its an early movement to prepare for gate clearing.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Your low flexed tranny is smooth and stable. I liked almost everything. Take a look at your outside hand postion. If you were to bring that appendage inward toward the turn it would make that outside hip come around faster with a very powerful/balanced stance. Try it, what do have to lose.
When you talk about driving the outside arm through the turn keeping the hips over the skis; can you describe that more in terms of what the gas pedal is and how to stay on it and not back off?

- Fossil
post #8 of 23
tdk6, very impressive skiing. I like your retraction transition, and your pivot/feather/carve sequence is looking pretty good. Modern slalom is all about how straight you can go, while still feathering your pivot into a clean, high energy carve without dumping speed via a sloppy feather phase.

You seem to be getting into your post pivot carve better this season, and the carve looks cleaner and steeper (higher angled). Your fore/aft this season seems better fore at the top of the turn, though this is an area that most racers always need to maintain focus on. Hard to see this clearly from the camera angle provided, but I'll just say keep striving to dive into the front of the boot at the top of your turns.

Things I see that may need some attention:

Two things in the lower body. Try narrowing your stance a tad. Your outside ski is your turning ski, and the closer you can get your inside ski to it, the closer you can move your outside turning ski to the gate. Closer you get your outside ski to the gate, the straighter line your CM can take down the slope. Just something to experiment with in slalom,,, GS is a different story. And don't take it too far. There is a boundary of effectiveness in this.

The other lower body issue I see is a fair amount of A framing. Narrowing the stance may take care of some of this. Mentally trying to keep a bit of space between the knees, and moving the angulation up to the hip to make that happen can help too. Perhaps a bit undercanted? Usually it's technical, and not equipment, but it's something to check out.

Above the waist I'm seeing a bit too much following of the skis with the hips and shoulders (rotational orientation) at the bottom of your turns. For modern slalom you need to get your shoulders directed more down the falline prior to transitional release to power a more significant pivot above the gate. Your montage of Rocca shows what I'm talking about. Reestablishing your pole plant may help you do this, as it can serve as a blocking agent that helps drive the upper body into an anticipated position during the transition. Without this strong anticipated position during your transitions, your transitional redirections (pivots) will be slower, smaller, and more forced than they could be,,, and need to be. This is probably the biggest issue I see in your skiing right now.

Now,,, put you in some gates, and a whole bundle of new things to talk about may appear. Anyway, a big on your skiing improvements, the package is looking purdy dang good.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Rick, thanks for your great posting. And thanks for you good words on my skiing. When I take in consideration that I whent through artroscophy (spelling??) on my right knee and got my meniscus trimmed in december and how I felt two weeks after surgery it seems like a miracle I could ski this well.

You pick up on very interesting issues and stuff I did not come to think of before. This year I have been consentrating on lowering my body so that I would flex through the transition and extend my leggs into the turn while my upper body remained more in the fall line. In order to do that I had to fold my upper body forward some and bring my arms in front to compensate for pointing my butt out the back in the transition without getting in the back seat. This has caused my skiing to become more hip inside the turn and angulation oriented than before and much quicker edge to edge. I can get my skis locked into a carve much soner in the turn and insted of skidding sideways I accelerate forwards.

Stance width will most deffinetly take me closer to the gate and improve my skiing. I have given this very much thaught lately and now due to your remark I can see that a wide stance in my case is an indication of being insecure. Better technique and equipment are going to take care of this misshap. Others have remarked on me placing too much weight on the inside ski and this I thaught was strange since my background is 100% outside ski pressure skiing. But moving into a wider stancewidth in combination with icy racing tracks and gates slamming against my helmet has derived me away from sufficient outside ski pressure.

I used to ski with an A-frame and that was cool until 2 years ago. I pritty much managed to fix it last year but it has crept into my skiing again this year. Its probably because Im undercanted (I will fix that) but also because Im not paying enough attention to my inside legg. My mental drill for parallel shins has been to make my knee pass on the other side of the gate. Others have allso pointed out that Im undercanted and especially on my left foot.

To be continued.....
post #10 of 23

I think it's all fine...

...which is pretty much what I said before. What I also said was "go run some gates and show us that video." A lot of times, what feels good/works free skiing doesn't necessarily translate immediately to a course. It's kind of like when I coach tennis, I focus more on getting players to move well on the court...footwork, anticipation, etc. Anybody can hit a ball if I feed it to the strike zone; only a real tennis player can make a decent shot off a ball that takes 3 steps or more to reach...but that's what tennis is, right? Because it's not golf, although a lot of people look at it that way.

So go run some gates, because anything you think is working free skiing either will work...or not...in the gates. And anything that either you think you should be working on or any of the posters do...and there's some pretty good feedback here...will also either work (or not) in a course. I've written a bunch of stuff in these forums about where I think slalom is going, but one of my teammates...who's a 40 point SL skier...and I were watching the 2006 Beaver Creek Men's SL. Some very different approaches. Albrecht, who was 3rd, skied incredibly cleanly and efficiently. Byggmark, who was 5th, looks like a drunk on roller skates. As my teammate said, "Byggmark looks like he's going out on every turn. When he stands up, he wins. When he doesn't, he's out." The guy won two WC events this year, from what I remember. Don't forget, the nice thing about racing is that there are no style points, and the clock doesn't lie.

I'd also spend some time training/running GS, because it's going to help your slalom. Don't forget speed events, either...
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
To be continued.....
Is this correct..... just before I hit the gate I should be leaning in, sort of a bit banked and slightly antisipated, square or countered depending on at what stage of the turn I am in. As I pass and block the gate my body is very close to square and the inclination should make it possible to easily clear it with my outside arm insted of having to crossblock. Straight after or just at the same time I should angulate for optimal edge hold at the most critical part of the turn. Pressure cannot be applied over a long period of time, it can only be dynamicly applied during a short instance. This is when angulation is at its max, at or slightly after the gate.

I suspect that I take a too high line in the gates and that I try to bring my hips into the turn too early. Somebody remarked at that earlier as well over in the other thread. As a result of that kind of move Im too countered at the gate and cannot clear that gate with my outside arm naturally. Insted I have to crossblock and that screws everything up big time. I need to ski more daring.

I need to work on proper antisipation.

SkiRacer 55, thanks for your posting. I didnt have time to get myselfe filmed in the gates. Winter was over before it even started and my cameraman brother Fi was out of town everytime we run gates. Anyway, here is a study I made of myselfe last year. Brings tears to your eyes, right . Im talking about the filming and the editing . Skiing also brings tears to my eyes but for other reasons....

http://sports.topeverything.com/defa...tent&ID=1A79EE
post #12 of 23

Your SL video from last year...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Is this correct..... just before I hit the gate I should be leaning in, sort of a bit banked and slightly antisipated, square or countered depending on at what stage of the turn I am in. As I pass and block the gate my body is very close to square and the inclination should make it possible to easily clear it with my outside arm insted of having to crossblock. Straight after or just at the same time I should angulate for optimal edge hold at the most critical part of the turn. Pressure cannot be applied over a long period of time, it can only be dynamicly applied during a short instance. This is when angulation is at its max, at or slightly after the gate.

I suspect that I take a too high line in the gates and that I try to bring my hips into the turn too early. Somebody remarked at that earlier as well over in the other thread. As a result of that kind of move Im too countered at the gate and cannot clear that gate with my outside arm naturally. Insted I have to crossblock and that screws everything up big time. I need to ski more daring.

I need to work on proper antisipation.

SkiRacer 55, thanks for your posting. I didnt have time to get myselfe filmed in the gates. Winter was over before it even started and my cameraman brother Fi was out of town everytime we run gates. Anyway, here is a study I made of myselfe last year. Brings tears to your eyes, right . Im talking about the filming and the editing . Skiing also brings tears to my eyes but for other reasons....

http://sports.topeverything.com/defa...tent&ID=1A79EE
...is not bad, but I see some stuff...will post tomorrow...
post #13 of 23
tdk6, just reviewed your gates video. As skiracer says, there are some things to talk about there. Issues that don't show up in your freeski video. If he doesn't get to it, or cover all I see, I'll MA it tomorrow for you (it's late, sorry, tired). Perhaps you could MA yourself in the meantime, and see if you see what we see.
post #14 of 23
Rick etal: you might want to note the date on the gates video,

It is last season. TDK6's current skiing might be different.
post #15 of 23

Okay, looking at your SL gates video…

...
as I said, looks pretty good, here are some thoughts. First, technical and I'll relate it to the 4 ski racing fundamentals that Ron LeMaster presented at his fall 2006 talk at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine:

- #1 - Quiet upper body. In general, you're looking pretty good here. To me, quiet upper body comes from a balanced stance and a good balancing act. Lots of people talk about the upper body and lower body. I think it makes a lot more sense to think about the torso from the belly button up, the legs, and the connection for those two parts being the hips, which is where all the core strength and flexibility for the body is. We have a great universal joint at the junction of the spine and pelvis and some swell ball and socket joints in the hips themselves...make sure those are loose, flexible, and strong so the upper body can stay quiet while the legs do whatever they need to. Every once in a while, it looks like you get tight in the core section. Keep that stuff loose and everything else will fall into line.

- #2 - Early outside knee angulation. What this really means to me is get on the new edge early, as in before the ski crosses the fall line. This is also known as the “upside down traverse.” I think you could do a lot more in this area. There are a couple of different cues for getting to the new edge early, and I think they have their pluses and minuses:

- Feel the little toe of the outside ski (old turn) rolling over. This kind of works, and I like the drill the US Team uses, which is you feel the little toe rolling over and simultaneously the big toe of the inside ski (old turn…will quickly become the outside ski of the new turn). If I only think about the little toe, I tend to tip in to get the edge. I see a certain amount of this (tipping in) in what you’re doing…which means the new edge may be happening, but you’re not necessarily getting early pressure on it.

- Drive the (new) outside knee forward and in. That is, early outside knee angulation. The drawback to this is that it may get you A-framing. However…regard what Bode is doing in the following article by Finn Gunderson:

http://www.ussa.org/PublishingFolder/assets/Files/MastersNL1106.pdf

Bode almost looks like he’s A-framing…but look at the incredible early edge angles he’s getting. I think we’re all so focused on maintaining absolutely parallel leg shafts that at times we’re forgotten that the absolute must is to get a big early edge angle but whatever method is available.

- Put your hip into the gate. This really worked for me. I was doing fine in Super G and DH because I got used to looking way ahead. In SL and GS, I was getting “gate fixation” and it developed into a bad habit of tipping in. I see a little of this in what you’re doing. Keep your eyes focused on track your skis are going to take, not the gate, and put your hip into it…not your head.
- #3 - Pressure the outside ski. There’s been a lot of talk about skiing two footed, parallel leg shafts, and so forth. Two footed is okay as far as whatever steering you have to do, but the pressure goes from outside ski to outside ski. This concept of putting the hip into the gate helped me a lot here, because it forces you to angulate…you can’t tip in on the inside ski. I think you’ll see that your pressure is a little two-footed…which doesn’t allow the outside ski to hook up and carve cleanly. What I also do for this, and it’s usually on GS skis, is to find something steep, hard, and smooth and make big, round GS turns at speed where you come all the way out of the fall line and carry your speed across the hill. It’s almost like the old style traverse. Because you’re holding the finish of the turn a little longer, you need to keep all your pressure outside or you’ll start chattering…and you won’t have a good platform for the next transition.

- #4 - Pressure the front of the ski early in the turn. This falls right in line with early, big edge angles. You’ve got decent pressure, but you need more pressure and earlier. Re what I said earlier about the upside down traverse, there’s a really good article that Ron LeMaster wrote for Ski Racing a year or so ago, where he talked about the new line being 50% of the turn above the gate, 50% below. That’s an ideal; sometimes you have to get a ton of it done ahead of time…as in a really offset gate. Regardless, when you make the part of the C shape that’s above the gate, you start out on a big edge angle with your skis pointing away from the gate…we call it “railing for the woods.” You have to apply pressure up here because you’ve just made the transition and there aren’t the forces available to bend the ski…you have to do it. You have to continue to press through the fall line, and then start getting off the ski once you’re making the 50% of the turn below the gate. Most people try to put the most pressure below the gate, and that’s the worst time to do it, because you’re fighting gravity and momentum. The optimum place to pressure the ski is on the upside.

If you think about the way today’s skis are shaped…fat tip, narrow center, fat tail…the only place that makes sense to bend the ski at the beginning of the turn is the tip. You’re trying to get the side cut of the ski to follow the shape of the turn. So, progressively, you bend the tip at the top, the middle in the fall line, and the tail at the end of the turn. The most important part is bending the tip on the upside of the turn…everything else will generally fall into place, because what begins well usually ends well. How do you bend the tip? Two things my coaches told me helped a lot: (1) Put your nose out over the shovel of your outside ski at the beginning of the turn. (2) There’s a sweet spot right behind the shovel where the side cut wants to engage. Once you’ve got your early edge angle, put pressure on that spot. Too many people push sideways and this just causes the ski to chatter sideways. In generally, I think you’ve got this going on; just think about really bending the tip early, by whatever means, and everything will happen sooner and more cleanly.

To this point, there’s been a lot of discussion about countering vs. standing square. Ron LeMaster’s feeling, and I agree, is that there’s a lot less of an emphasis on countering, but it’s still around, and it’s useful. As he points out, it’s also a matter of what works for the individual. Bode counters a lot, Daron counters very little…and they both win. The thing I like about having a little counter via “put your nose over the shovel of the ski at the beginning of the turn” is that it tends to keep you from following the ski at the end of the turn…which can lead to pressure going back, pressure going to the inside…and if you really follow the ski with your whole body, it’s hard to be quick enough to get back around the corner for the next turn. In general, I think you’re in pretty good shape…but at the end of the second sequence, you’re definitely following your skis. One thing that causes this is that you’re reaching for your cross-block. In a word, don’t. Just take the gate with whatever part of your body volunteers first, as a friend of mine said. If you’re reaching for your cross-block, it’s usually because you’re straight and late. Sometimes an inside hand block is the right answer, however. One of my teammates goes into a hair pin with an inside hand block and uses the same hand to do an outside hand block on the way out. It makes sense, and it’s now what I do. Try it, you’ll like it.

We’ve strayed over into tactics, so let’s do that part next:

-You’re basically making two turns on every gate. Or, more accurately, you’re doing a stivot (pivot to an edge) at the top of the turn, followed by a straight section straight down the fall line, followed by a carved half-C portion in the last part of the turn. It’s not real super bad or super obvious, but it’s there. You need to make one clean, round turn. See what I said, above, about the upside down traverse and early pressure. It’s also your tactics. You’re doing what one of my teammates was doing earlier this year, which is basically skiing gate to gate. What you need to see is something John Loeffler codified. Namely, that in a series of open gates, there are two vertical corridors in the fall line. One is the corridor where the turning gates of the right footed turns are roughly at the horizontal center of the corridor. The other corridor is where the turning gates of the left footed turns are at the horizontal center. As Ben Brown, who coaches Masters at Loveland noted in an article this year, the racer who spends the most time in the fall line is going to be the winner. Your job is to spend as much time in those corridors as possible and as little time as possible going back and forth between the corridors.

To do that, don’t fixate on the gates. As you’re approaching the next gate, focus outside of the gate…even outside of the track your skis will take…and look down that corridor. What this will automatically get you to do is get more altitude (vertical) above the gate and more horizontal. Line in SL is real controversial these days. Nobody wants to ski too round. But my coaches managed to convince me that if you seek the corridor, get outside and early, you’ll come back to the gate and go right through it. Paradoxically, if you aim at the gate, you’ll end up wide, low, and chattering your filling out down in the harbor chop.

The two turns within a turn that you’re doing is also throwing off your line and timing, because you’re hesitating after the stivot and letting the gate come to you. Don’t let that happen, go to it. If you set up outside and with enough vertical, you won’t have to start the turn, hesitate, then finish the turn. You’ll be able to just swoop through the whole thing.

If this all sounds like I’m dissing your free skiing or gate skiing, I’m not. I think you’ve got remarkably solid stuff going on. These are just some things to think about to help you move up to the next level. If they work…fine. If not…well, we’ll come up with something better. I do think that a lot of the turn shape issues can get resolved by spending a lot of time free skiing GS length turns or running GS courses…or Super G or downhill. The speed events teach you patience, among other things, which you need in SL as well. I know…those nasty little rapid gates come up fast, don’t they? If you can get set up ahead of the gate, you’ll find out you have an amazing amount of time to make one clean arc, not two or three…

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
Rick etal: you might want to note the date on the gates video,

It is last season. TDK6's current skiing might be different.
Good point skier_j. The gate video and all skiing made with the orange jacket is from last year and the one of me free skiing in my first post in black clothing is from 2007.
post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

Great MA

SkiRacer55, WOW . That is what I call a pritty thorough MA and it will take some time for me to brake it down. Im off to china for the weekend so I will not be able to respond much right now. Amazing how much information is possible to get from pros of the trade. Thanks one more time and thanks also for the link.

Tom
post #18 of 23

You're welcome...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
SkiRacer55, WOW . That is what I call a pritty thorough MA and it will take some time for me to brake it down. Im off to china for the weekend so I will not be able to respond much right now. Amazing how much information is possible to get from pros of the trade. Thanks one more time and thanks also for the link.

Tom

...remember, this all In My Humble Opinion. Use what works and skip the rest...if you have any questions, by all means, please ask. Talk to you again soon...

Richard
post #19 of 23
Quote:
To do that, don’t fixate on the gates. As you’re approaching the next gate, focus outside of the gate…even outside of the track your skis will take…and look down that corridor. What this will automatically get you to do is get more altitude (vertical) above the gate and more horizontal. Line in SL is real controversial these days. Nobody wants to ski too round. But my coaches managed to convince me that if you seek the corridor, get outside and early, you’ll come back to the gate and go right through it. Paradoxically, if you aim at the gate, you’ll end up wide, low, and chattering your filling out down in the harbor chop.
Say I'm coming to a left turn. Am I looking outside to the right of the turning pole or inside to the left of the turning pole?
Quote:
Namely, that in a series of open gates, there are two vertical corridors in the fall line. One is the corridor where the turning gates of the right footed turns are roughly at the horizontal center of the corridor. The other corridor is where the turning gates of the left footed turns are at the horizontal center. As Ben Brown, who coaches Masters at Loveland noted in an article this year, the racer who spends the most time in the fall line is going to be the winner. Your job is to spend as much time in those corridors as possible and as little time as possible going back and forth between the corridors.
Is the corridor half way from the turning pole to the outside pole plus the same distance to the inside of the turning pole? Questions from someone who as you put so articulately is "chattering your filling out down in the harbor chop"

Thanks - Fossil
post #20 of 23

I knew this wasn't going to work well in a words only mode...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Fossil View Post
Say I'm coming to a left turn. Am I looking outside to the right of the turning pole or inside to the left of the turning pole? Is the corridor half way from the turning pole to the outside pole plus the same distance to the inside of the turning pole? Questions from someone who as you put so articulately is "chattering your filling out down in the harbor chop"

Thanks - Fossil
...see attached. This is a basically a rewrite of a 3-part lesson plan I did for one of my teammates...
post #21 of 23

MA - Movement Analysis Technique Articles - SL & GS

tdk6 - I liked the slow motion and especially the overlay in your helpful ski racing video (http://sports.topeverything.com/defa...ent&ID=1A79EE). What software program/version and camcorder model was used to create the overlay and slow motion scenes? What software speed setting did you use for the overlay and slow motion scenes?



SkiRacer55

This is one of the best MA that I have seen in years. I especially liked your idea "Put your hip into the gate" to avoid gate fixation.

Thanks also for the link to the excellent GS article ("Modern Giant Slalom" by Finn Gunderson with photo montages by Ron LeMaster pages 8-9 of Autumn 2006 Masters Newsletter http://www.ussa.org/PublishingFolder...tersNL1106.pdf) by Finn Gunderson - U.S. Ski Team Director of Alpine Education. I like the way Finn Gunderson broke the GS into 4 phases with notes for masters racers.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
- #4 - Pressure the front of the ski early in the turn. This falls right in line with early, big edge angles. You’ve got decent pressure, but you need more pressure and earlier. Re what I said earlier about the upside down traverse, there’s a really good article that Ron LeMaster wrote for Ski Racing a year or so ago, where he talked about the new line being 50% of the turn above the gate, 50% below.
SkiRacer55 - Is this the article "Line Evolution - Survival of the Fastest" by Ron LeMaster http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/LineEvolution-3.pdf



Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
What you need to see is something John Loeffler codified. Namely, that in a series of open gates, there are two vertical corridors in the fall line. One is the corridor where the turning gates of the right footed turns are roughly at the horizontal center of the corridor. The other corridor is where the turning gates of the left footed turns are at the horizontal center. As Ben Brown, who coaches Masters at Loveland noted in an article this year, the racer who spends the most time in the fall line is going to be the winner.
SkiRacer55 - Is this the article "Top Gun Briefing" by Ben Brown in Rocky Mountain Masters SnowNews June 2006 page 8 http://www.rmmskiracing.org/snownews...ws-2006-06.pdf "Anyone who is fast at ski racing is not afraid of speed, or in other words they are the racers that are in the fall line most of the time." "Racing is a sport of inches and if you're not in the fall line or looking for it all the time you may need to reevaluate your preparation." Importance of mental strength, physical strength (aerobic base, core strength, flexibility), and equipment.


SkiRacer55 - Do you have more info (link, article title, publication name, publication date) about the article by John Loeffler? Thanks for posting the "What's My Line" http://forums.epicski.com/attachment...1&d=1177086283 lesson plan. Have you considered posting "What's My Line" in the SnowNews & Articles section http://www.rmmskiracing.org/snownews.htm of the Rocky Mountain Masters website?
post #22 of 23

SkierScott...

...you pretty much figured out where all the bones are buried. The Loeffler stuff...I don't know if he's actually published it or not, several of my coaches either trained under, coached with, or were on the hill a lot with Loeffler, so I got this second hand...but I think it's pretty accurate. Sure, I'll talk to the RMM Webmaster and see if I can get "What's My Line?" on the Articles page.

Not bad for a downhiller, huh? Once in a while, I can do this stuff in SL, but mostly I'm just a sponge, and whatever I end up with usually turns up on paper or on the 'Net since my official job is in the Words 'R' Us racket (translation: I make the $$$$ to buy Mass Quantities of skis by doing software technical documentation, but I've also free lanced for Powder, Ski Racing, and so forth...)
post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkierScott View Post
tdk6 - I liked the slow motion and especially the overlay in your helpful ski racing video. What software program/version and camcorder model was used to create the overlay and slow motion scenes? What software speed setting did you use for the overlay and slow motion scenes?
Hi Scott. Glad you liked the video and the overlay. Im using a 3y old high end recreational Sony miniDV camera and a 100dollar Sony Vegas entry level software. This setup works like a dream and Im totally blown away by stuff Im able to do. Im basicly slowing down the video to half speed for slowmotions but on the original video in this thread I used 0,25 I think because my 9y old cameraman did not manage to hold the camera as steady as my brother in the gate racing video. In Vegas Movie Studio you have 3 video traxs and 2 audio traxs and that gives me the possibility to place both clips one abowe one annother and tone them both down to 50% each. Then I just dragged them so that they matched at the first gate. Pritty cool, figured it out myselfe and it gives a good picture of where king of the hill is faster than me. Too bad I never got any video this year since the winter was so short but next year I will try to get some new gate skiing filming done. I think this consept of filming, editing and posting on the net for MA like this is an unbeatable way of getting good feedback and look for improvement.
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