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Hot Waxing - to scrape or not to scrape?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Put a fresh coat of Zoom on my skis this morning. On the last pass I used a paper towel under the iron so soak up residual wax.

After allowing the wax to harden for 2 hours I scraped and brushed one ski. The other ski I left with the paper towel finish.

When I first put the skis on, the brushed ski had a bit more glide to it. However, by the middle of the first run I could non tell which ski was scraped and brushed (I switched back and forth just to double check).

At the end of the day I checked the skis and the wax finish looked the same on both skis.

So, no more scraping for me unless I'm racing.
post #2 of 12

1,2,3,4....

That's me counting how long it takes the other thread on same question to find this one! http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=55190

I predict your experiment will please skier219... both for its scientific study design, and for your validation of his "don't bother, it's smooth after 20-50 feet into the first run."

In the meantime, a naive question: When you leave unscraped, does that also include EDGES? i.e., do you just let them wear off, as well... or do you expose base and side edges?
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
When I first put the skis on, the brushed ski had a bit more glide to it. However, by the middle of the first run I could non tell which ski was scraped and brushed (I switched back and forth just to double check).

At the end of the day I checked the skis and the wax finish looked the same on both skis.
.

How abrasive was the snow? I've seen new powder that left poorly scraped patches all day, whereas spring snow will remove any excess in seconds.

I also went skiing with a friend on a powder day who forgot to scrape, and had to go ski on a huge thick layer. His skis were flying, much to our surprise.

This wax business is never simple, is it?
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
How abrasive was the snow? I've seen new powder that left poorly scraped patches all day, whereas spring snow will remove any excess in seconds.
Fluffy powdery stuff up top, abrasive down at the lower elevations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I also went skiing with a friend on a powder day who forgot to scrape, and had to go ski on a huge thick layer. His skis were flying, much to our surprise.
I almost never scrape, even on powder days. BUT, I do use a paper towel pass that leaves a nice even finish. I've noticed uneven removal of the wax but I don't feel it when I ski so I don't worry about it. I did the test because one of my racer friends was insisting that scraping and brushing was required for proper ski glide. Maybe so, but I'm not scraping unless there is a race.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKN View Post
n the meantime, a naive question: When you leave unscraped, does that also include EDGES? i.e., do you just let them wear off, as well... or do you expose base and side edges?
Yeah, I leave the wax on the edges too. It comes right off when I start skiing.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
. I did the test because one of my racer friends was insisting that scraping and brushing was required for proper ski glide. Maybe so, but I'm not scraping unless there is a race.
It never even crossed my mind not to scrape until recently. Just part of my upbringing.

I do know that in cold snow you are dead in the water if you don't scrape. On cold Colorado snow after a clear night we used to scrape and use a whole series of brushes on our xc skis. The difference was dramatic between even normal scraping and brushing, and brushing the crap out of it.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I do know that in cold snow you are dead in the water if you don't scrape.
I've skied well into negative temps without scraping. I point the skis down the hill and the snow gives me a nice finish. Might not work in powder but I always take a warm up run on a groomed slope first.
post #8 of 12
Well, that's one less set of tracks on the ungroomed when the rope drops.
post #9 of 12

eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Might not work in powder but I always take a warm up run on a groomed slope first.
On a powder day ????!!!
Wish there were more skiers like you at my hill...
post #10 of 12
At some places, if you take that first run on a groomer, it'll all be tracked by the time you get back to the top.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKN View Post
That's me counting how long it takes the other thread on same question to find this one! http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=55190

I predict your experiment will please skier219... both for its scientific study design, and for your validation of his "don't bother, it's smooth after 20-50 feet into the first run."

Yeah, that is nice to hear -- I love a good experiment. Excellent work Max!
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrogen_wv View Post
At some places, if you take that first run on a groomer, it'll all be tracked by the time you get back to the top.
I like to warm up a bit before I jump off piste. Fewer injuries that way. Plus, I ski down a groomed run to get to the next lift to access the good stuff anyway so it works out nicely.
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