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Should I buy G-Ride boots?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm looking to buy my first pair of AT boots. I have a new pair of BD KiloWatt skis (175cm, 95mm underfoot) with Fritschi Freeride bindings. I've been skiing them on fresh pow and trees inbounds with my alpine boots (Lange Comp 120's), and have taken them on a short (1.5 in) mile BC tour with the same boots.
I wear a size 9 1/2 to 10 street shoe, my alpine ski boots are a 27.5, and my previous alpine boots were a 28. Here's the thing: I found a new pair of Garmont G-Ride AT boots, size 27.0, for $225. They fit nicely everywhere except the toe box of my longer foot. My question is, first, what will happen to length once I have the G-Fit liner heat molded; second will the liner pack out over time like alpine boot liners do; and third, can I grind out the toe box of this boot to give me more length? Also, any general comments good or bad about this boot?
post #2 of 18
In a word, yes. Garmont makes great AT boots. They sound like they fit to me. They are going to pack out. I work in a backcountry shop and we tend to guide people towards a tighter fit at first. If somebody comes in and loves the way the boot feels, we immediately grab a smaller size. My girlfriend got mega rides this year and they fit her a little tight. We didn't bake them right away (or yet). And believe me, I heard about how snug they were for the first few tours of the season the whole hike up. Now she LOVES them. Still haven't baked them, but they've packed out perfectly. She's put a few tours on 'em (I make her hike a bunch) and they are the only boots she wears. Even riding lifts, she won't touch her old alpine boot, just the mega rides. I would hike 'em a couple of times, then bake em. You can bake them more than once. When you bake them put a toe cap buffer around your toes and that will give you good space when they are done molding. But like I said, we never baked them, and they are perfect now. Those garmont liners are puffy at first, but it will mold well. $225 for new garmonts, I'd grab em.
post #3 of 18
In my experience you can't do much grinding or punching with at boots, the plastic is too thin and won't hold the shape of a punch for long. Unlike alpine boots where you always have your weight on your shins, toe fit is pretty important. 100 bucks or so won't seem like a good deal at all in the 8th hour of a 12 hour tour if the boots don't fit well.
post #4 of 18
Oh, and ps: you may want to get boots that have dynafit inserts so that your evolution to better bindings will be cheaper.
post #5 of 18
humpndunk, you really need to be sure that the shell is the right size. Take the liner out and put your foot in and stand so that the toes are touching the front of the toe box. There needs to be about 1/2 to 3/4 inch of space between your heel and the back of the shell - like a thick finger width. If the shells are too small, you aren't going to have much luck with liner cooking, grinding or blowing out the shell. If they pass the shell fit test, then cooking the liners as described (toe cap, etc.) shoud work great.

Like the man says, you won't care how much your boots cost if your feet hurt like hell 2 miles into a 5 mile tour.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
Oh, and ps: you may want to get boots that have dynafit inserts so that your evolution to better bindings will be cheaper.
Heh - good advice, but the problem there is that the burliest Dynafit-compatible boot that Garmont makes is the softish Mega Ride.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
Oh, and ps: you may want to get boots that have dynafit inserts so that your evolution to better bindings will be cheaper.
you mean devolution, and is there a new definition of "better"?
I have G-fit boots, and would highly recommend them for touring. I climb Mount Washington every spring, which involves a 2 hour hike up with 75 pound pack, and ever since I did that in my G-ride boots, I now leave my hiking boots home. The stability on the rock scramble is superb, the comfort is so good, the downhill performance is OK, I spend 4 days hiking/camping/skiing in them, smiling.
Everything mentioned here about fit is about exactly what I would have said. Do the shell fit and see if that toe has room, if it doesn't I would definitely pass on these boots. Toe room is very important with touring.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
Oh, and ps: you may want to get boots that have dynafit inserts so that your evolution to better bindings will be cheaper.
This is true, no matter what anyone tells you, dynafits are the way to go for almost anyone. Unless you huck 30+ foot cliffs every time you go. Dynafits ski great. And they are super light. There is hardly any sound. And they hike like all get out (good). Eventually you want dynafits. But by the time you want dynafits you'll be so far in that spending a little extra on some mega rides (dynafit compatable) won't be that big of a deal.

I mean, $225 for new garmont G-Rides? Sometimes demo's don't go for that. You'll hike your fritschis and g rides for a long time. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that rig. When you eventually, maybe a little while, get dynafits, you'll want new boots anyway.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
Oh, and ps: you may want to get boots that have dynafit inserts so that your evolution to better bindings will be cheaper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


Heh - good advice, but the problem there is that the burliest Dynafit-compatible boot that Garmont makes is the softish Mega Ride.
Bob Lee likes him some burly boots,

not trolly,
honest question,
to Bob Lee
what boots do you tour in? And on what binders?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post
Bob Lee likes him some burly boots,

not trolly,
honest question,
to Bob Lee
what boots do you tour in? And on what binders?
Uh oh, I'm outed. I tour in T1s (w/ thermoliners) and G3 Targas or Ascents. Right, tele gear. But it's burly tele gear...at least the boots are.



But, uh, I have...friends that use AT gear. Yeah, that's it - friends.

And I'm not sayin' people need to have burly touring gear, I was just pointing out that the Dynafit-compatible Garmonts are lighter/softer than the G-Rides. NTTAWWT.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
Uh oh, I'm outed. I tour in T1s (w/ thermoliners) and G3 Targas or Ascents. Right, tele gear. But it's burly tele gear...at least the boots are.



But, uh, I have...friends that use AT gear. Yeah, that's it - friends.

And I'm not sayin' people need to have burly touring gear, I was just pointing out that the Dynafit-compatible Garmonts are lighter/softer than the G-Rides. NNTAWWT.
That's some burly tele gear, but your on ascents, and no tele gear is that burly

maybe t races

I have to leave the photo up, not enough photos on this site
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advice, guys. I'll go and shell fit the G-Rides. Don't know why I didn't do that the first time. I'll bring my custom footbeds also, see if that makes a difference.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
you mean devolution, and is there a new definition of "better"?
Same definition. No slop when skiing, no reverse ramp angle, it doesn't feel like I'm on stilts. As for touring, way lighter, better pivot point, no resitance, more durable (i went though two pairs of freerides in two seasons). Just overall a better system for touring I think. But, to each his own, you guys on freerides/naxos always save the best powder for me.
post #13 of 18
Question from somebody too lazy to look it up - do the current Dynafit bindings have DIN releases? That was why I went with the Freerides in the first place.

Phobic about my aging knees... not that I fall much any more but you know the one time I do fall hard I won't release...
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountaingirl1961 View Post
... do the current Dynafit bindings have DIN releases? ..
Dynafits have very reliable DIN releases. Plus there is an advantage -- you can lock the toe release down for occasions on which any release might not be desired.
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

Lates update on G-Ride purchase decision...

Okay, after everyone's advice, I went back to the shop to shell-fit those G-Rides I was asking about. They're perfect. Markings in the shell though indicate they are 27.5, while markings on the liners indicate 27.0. I know alpine boots work this way (half sizes created by different size liners, not diferent shell sizes) but I didn't know that's how Garmonts worked. Anyway I tried on the liner without the shell and sure enough, it's the liner that is cramping my toes. I was going to buy the boots and just hope that cooking the liner would provide extra length, but then I spied a box of used liners in the corner (this is a consignement/closeout shop.) Incredibly, I found a pair of brand-new 27.5 Garmont liners in the box, and with these liners and the 27.5 shell, the boots felt awesome. I bought 'em: $225 for new G-Rides plus $22 for the extra liners. (They're lace-up liners and not G-Fit, but they feel great.) If and when they pack out, I can try switching to the 27.0 G-Fits.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by humpndunk View Post
If and when they pack out, I can try switching to the 27.0 G-Fits.
Somebody who knows a whole lot more than I do told me it'd take about 25 days for that to happen, FYI.

Save yer pennies...
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by humpndunk View Post
I found a pair of brand-new 27.5 Garmont liners in the box, (They're lace-up liners and not G-Fit, but they feel great.)
Step 1 -Take the laces out and throw them away. If they are Garmont liners and have laces, they are the G-Fit3. The laces are no good. The liners are fine, and will work great without laces. We threw out all of the laces on the new garmonts in the shop. When you yank up on them, they will end up pulling out the eyelets. This is probably why you got a $200+ liner for 20 bucks. Garmont wouldn't take them back because that would open a sh*tstorm of a warranty issue.

Good find, stoked they fit. Great price. The liners will be fine, you just need to get rid of the laces.
post #18 of 18
For what it's worth, my thermofit liners packed out in less than a year (Garmont Megarides). I felt that they were worthless. Next time around, I might get Intuition liners. FYI, Garmont shell sizes come in whole sizes only - liners change every 1/2 size. The new Garmont lace up liners are still thermofit liners, one can still bake them like the older liners.
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