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Ski safety - new idea? - Page 2

post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
The airbag idea is something we have been brainstorming on as well.. though it seems very difficult to find something reasonable to make
Pads are already done in several different ways. ABS avalanche airbag is also already done, though my prediction is that it succeeds in providing only the illusion of safety.

Google Boukreev and "Oxygen Illusion," an excellent summary of why gear can be dangerous.

Seriously, does tech have to mean gear for your class? It could also mean systems. 2 quick ideas: 1. the groomer shutdown system that prevents groomer operation. No grooming = far fewer deaths. 2. The "math is easy, trees are hard" educational system.
post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Virtual reality glasses that allow you to 'experience skiing' from the safety of your couch. This will work 100% of the time.

You're welcome.
Not 100% safe. Virtual reality manufactures will be subject to lawsuits if their videos makes the user move quickly on the couch resulting in neck or back problems.

Personally I kind of like the fact that skiing is not 100% safe. On the other hand I don't want to ski down a slope with metal spike obstacles (features) placed in the trail.

There will (should) be small improvements in equipment to help prevent common injuries like phantom foot ACL injury. This requires analysis of the most common injury data.
post #33 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
- Avalanches* Assisting skiers to identify and avoid risk. Some stuff here, but not so much.
* Assisting ski areas in identifying and reducing risk (aka "avalanche control")
Isn't this the AIARE education system? Lots of avy awareness/certification out there.

No substitute for taking a class in the field with a professional instructor.
post #34 of 68
I don't think a transceiver suppository would work... If I got caught in an avalanche, i'd probably crap my pants.... Well, I guess it'd work as long as my pants didn't get torn off....

If the pants did, though.... Transceiver signals, someone searches for signal... find crap filled pants....
post #35 of 68
Thread Starter 
Splitter -> I'm danish
post #36 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrooK View Post
Splitter -> I'm danish
The IFMGA (international federation of mountain guides association) use virtually the same benchmarks as AIARE.

Regarding the availability of avy awareness classes in Denmark, perhaps people should receive their education from internationally recognized alpine skills instructors.

If you really want a book (or some other safety invention), they are already out there.
Won't replace field work with an experienced professional.
There is no better tool for detecting instability in the snowpack than getting down on your hands and knees and digging and looking and digging and ski cutting and digging and listening and breaking cornices (on purpose) and looking and...
post #37 of 68
Something that would be bio-olfactory?

A spray on aerosol type product that would keep boarders, jibbers and other social misfits away from you.

You could call it ..... Jer-Away .... or Border-B-Gone ...
post #38 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Something that would be bio-olfactory?

A spray on aerosol type product that would keep boarders, jibbers and other social misfits away from you.

You could call it ..... Jer-Away .... or Border-B-Gone ...
After a couple of 'good natured' jabs at snowboarders on this thread, I'm gonna have to recommend an anti-prick spray for skiers. Or some sort of force field on the boarder of Kansas and Colorado to keep all the east coast skiers on the east coast.
post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I haven't had the pleasure of BC Skiing yet, but I can imagine a becon can malfunction. So if you had equipment that has it built in, ONE of them should surely work and lend to being rescued.
it doesst matter TC, you skis and poles wil lmore than likely get sheered off in a avalance causing more false reading. if you beacon doesnt work and you skis does you still wont be found.
post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
it doesst matter TC, you skis and poles wil lmore than likely get sheered off in a avalance causing more false reading. if you beacon doesnt work and you skis does you still wont be found.
are you drunk already?
post #41 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post
are you drunk already?
nope and just relized that on the second page a million replies saying the same thing
post #42 of 68
Number one on my list would have to be more sophisticated bindings that would prevent typical knee/leg injuries. I have to think electronics could improve the situation. Use accelerometers, strain gauges, and other sensors to independently determine when a release should happen, not loads transferred through the body to the ski/binding!! (note the obvious flaw in that).

Number 2 would be a personal force field that could deflect boarders/dirtbags that get too close
post #43 of 68
Thread Starter 
Nice ideas - one problem is that our budget only is $100
post #44 of 68
How about a helmet-mounted rear-view mirror for boarders, so that they can see behind themselves while making heel-side turns? Come to think of it, this might be useful for skiers to spot other riders coming up behind also.
post #45 of 68
Thread Starter 
Isn't it much easier to just turn the head?
post #46 of 68
Turning the head (looking uphill .... cept' when starting), is the worst thing for good skiing technique and puts you off balance and on the wrong edge.
post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Turning the head (looking uphill .... cept' when starting), is the worst thing for good skiing technique and puts you off balance and on the wrong edge.
Then again...maybe it could be a drill to isolate the head turn and not let it affect the rest of one's technique.

I used to guide visually impaired skiers at Winter Park. Turning my head frequently to watch for "incoming" was far more important than perfect technique. Of course, my technique was pretty mediocre, anyway. Some might say it still is.

For $100, instead of a gadget, how about an educational tool? For example, something to assist new skiers with boot fitting, which will presumably lead to fewer injuries and more enjoyment.

You've given yourself a difficult task. Skiing is risky enough that many safety issues have already been considered and analyzed by some very thoughtful people. Many fundamental issues have had at least partial solutions applied, to the extent that many causes of injury don't happen as often as they used to - and when they do, there is often some stupidity or deliberate risk-taking involved, on somebody's part (not that I am equating deliberate risk-taking with stupidity - I'm not).
post #48 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Turning the head (looking uphill .... cept' when starting), is the worst thing for good skiing technique and puts you off balance and on the wrong edge.
I guess you're not into sluff management. Looking uphill never bothered me, in fact it's saved my ass a few times. Of course, I've got skillz you could only dream of.:
post #49 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Turning the head (looking uphill .... cept' when starting), is the worst thing for good skiing technique and puts you off balance and on the wrong edge.
Gotta always have that perfect technique! C'mon...
post #50 of 68
Comments about the notion of looking up the hill can diverge into a hijack and another thread (as hashed out before), hence I was brief. Of course there are reasons to look up, especially when "riding tail" on a bunch of newbees in a lesson, or when the sounds of a crash are imminent.

Besides, on eastern ice, there aren't many going faster than I am so it's a rare issue ... Jer, ya' got no worries on my coming out west to defecate on your powder stash ... got no need for it. :
post #51 of 68
Hoping to turn this into a 12-page debate about marijuana and skiing...

...I'll suggest a lighter capable of working in a snowstorm.

:
post #52 of 68
And a tiny blow spoon with a wind deflector?
post #53 of 68
That lighter is already invented. Its called a Zippo. What is really needed is a rubber pad to fit around the bowl so you don't chip your teeth.

So I have heard...

Blow on the lift? Gondola maybe but lift? Besides who does blow any more? That is so 1980s.
post #54 of 68
Resorts could offer free lessons, especially to goofy boarders who have no idea as to what they are doing. Folks would jump on free basic level lessons and that would make things a lot safer. And people would be more attacted to skiing. This would be a winner for the industry.

Oh, wait this about technology? Ok... how about robot ski instructors....
post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Virtual reality glasses that allow you to 'experience skiing' from the safety of your couch. This will work 100% of the time.

You're welcome.
How about sunglasses/goggles that make it so that you think you're hucking a huge cliff when its just teensy weensy. That way you feel like you've done the Hospital Air but are a lot safer!:
post #56 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
If anything, I'd like to se someone invent a product which makes skiing less safe.
serrated poles for chinese downhill?
post #57 of 68
two words.....caffinated bacon
post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
A kind of analytical way to come at this is to start with the sources of danger, and then think about ways to minimize that danger.
This makes sense. After my first year on patrol, here are what I perceive to be the sources of danger and the minimization solutions:
- lifts: stop them to load and unload each chair, suspend them somehow so there are no towers
- trees: cut 'em down, all of 'em
- terrain: close everything steeper than a green
- terrain parks: close 'em.
- people: eliminate skier collisions, - one run/one person
- alcohol: close the bars, administer BAC tests at the lift
- hard/icy/heavy snow: no manmade, groom everything, close the area after a thaw/freeze, keep walkways clear of ice and snow (that last one actually makes sense)
- MIs, strokes, AMS, exhaustion: extensive cardio-pulmonary physicals for all skiers, O2 available in ride-along packs, demonstrated fitness before ticket purchase
- auto traffic: the most dangerous thing we do is drive to the area - eliminate cars

That would take care of about 95% of the danger and injuries for skiing. Avalanches? Pffft!
post #59 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
- terrain: close everything steeper than a green
what about this "green" run?

post #60 of 68
Kind of like the airbag idea, but just filled with helium so you just float up and away in case of an avalanche. It would be a magnet for pranks, though.
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