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Skiing colleges - Page 2

post #31 of 46
I wouldn't listen to those who say you should choose a school first and consider skiing secondarily. Any reputable school can provide you with an excellent education, if you're smart about it.

There was an interesting study done by some economists who compared students who had been accepted to prestigious schools but ended up attending state university type schools to those who had attended the prestigious ivy league schools. Some years later the researchers compared the ivy league grads to the state U grads, and found no differences in income and some other measures of "success." So, once again, I'd say your education is what you make of it, find a decent school in ski country, find out who the best teachers are, take their classes, and work hard.
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Queen View Post
I wouldn't listen to those who say you should choose a school first and consider skiing secondarily. Any reputable school can provide you with an excellent education, if you're smart about it.
If your choosing a school based solely on the potential number of powder days it might give you the opportunity to have, I'd have to question that person's ability to guide their own education at any school and get the most out of it.

I'd look at it this way, longterm, what has a greater value of importance, more days on the hill a year for 4 years of college and potentially less per year the remaining 50 or so years of your life, or a less days a year for 4 years of college and potentially more days a year for the remaining 50 or so of your life??
post #33 of 46
Why waste your time in college or university oif what you want to do is ski?

Who's approval are you trying to win? Why not do what YOU want?

If you're not dedicating yourself to higher education don't bother with it.

What will you study - and why?
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
Why waste your time in college or university oif what you want to do is ski?
If you're not dedicating yourself to higher education don't bother with it.

Ok, this one is a bit too strong.

I went off to coolege as a good student, serious about school, but wanted to ski more than anything. I got out of high school a year early and hadn't applied to any schools. I found a heck of a party school, the Ameican College in Leysin Switzerland. I skied 100 days that year, and since I was one of the few students really applying themselves, received an award as the outstanding science and math student. I did a lot of drinking, sex and some drugs, tons of skiing, but still learned something.

From there I applied for transfer to a fancy school. Dartmouth was only taking female transfers, as they had just gone co-ed, Middlebury offered me a spot mid term, and Colby, who was admitting about 10 transferrs out of 150 applications offered me a spot.

Sure, it was a different world, but I continued to do as much skiing as I could. I had to cut back to about 60 days a year, and I was distinctly average among the students, but skiing and school still mixed and in the end I raced Alpine, cross country, jumped, and still did well on my GRE's and got into the grad school of my choice, which incidentally was in another ski town, Flagstaff Arizona. I had even less time there, but I still got my degree, and coached some high school racers and skied backcountry and powder whenever I could. I got a job in Geology when I graduated, and again, I insisted on one in ski country, and found it.

Now, can anyone explain to me why I shouldn't have put skiing as one of my primary criteria for picking a school? It is the one time in your life when you have some real freedom on where you live. I can't see that I didn't get what I wanted out of each school I attended. Why on earth would I have missed all that skiing?

I had no idea what I would major in. My first Geology class included trips to glaciers, various Alps, mines, caves, etc. Someone told me my father was thrilled that I sounded as enthused about Geology as the skiing. Heck, I probably wouldn't have found that major if it wasn't in ski country. Skiers belong in ski country, where they'll make contacts and learn about the areas they'll be happiest living in after school.
post #35 of 46
One thing not mentioned is that once you graduate, it's much easier to find a job near your school. I went to school in Delaware, and found a job I love in Delaware, but what that means is that I've got 500 miles to drive to get to VT and even PA ski hills take 3-4 hours to get to.

That being said, I have a job I love that lets me take time off to fly to CO when I need to.

post #36 of 46
While I'm on the pulpet, let me tell you what my first job entailed. I was sent to Oklahoma for nine months of Geophysical training, along with 24 other new hires. After we finished they were to ship us to Denver, Houston, Tulsa, Midland or Oklahoma City.

I was one of two sent to Denver, out of 12 that requested it.

If I had gone to say, Texas A&M for grad school because they had a bigger Geology Dept. than Nothern Arizona I'm sure I would have ended up in a Texas office.
post #37 of 46
My daughtor was accepted at Castleton college in Vermont which is 3 exits from Rutland. They have a ski team, transportation to pico and Killington, and a student pass that is cheap. Because Castleton is a Vermont State School and we live out of state, her financial aid package was bleak, she ended not attending that school.

RW
post #38 of 46
Im staring out my "dorm" window right now and looking at Killington. Im a ski resort managment major at Green Mountian College. I have well over 80 days this season and am getting a BS in how to do this professionally for the rest of my life. Just a suggestion. If you want more info pm me.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Ok, this one is a bit too strong.

I went off to coolege as a good student, serious about school, but wanted to ski more than anything. I got out of high school a year early and hadn't applied to any schools. I found a heck of a party school, the American College in Leysin Switzerland. I skied 100 days that year, and since I was one of the few students really applying themselves, received an award as the outstanding science and math student. I did a lot of drinking, sex and some drugs, tons of skiing, but still learned something.

From there I applied for transfer to a fancy school. Dartmouth was only taking female transfers, as they had just gone co-ed, Middlebury offered me a spot mid term, and Colby, who was admitting about 10 transferrs out of 150 applications offered me a spot.

Sure, it was a different world, but I continued to do as much skiing as I could. I had to cut back to about 60 days a year, and I was distinctly average among the students, but skiing and school still mixed and in the end I raced Alpine, cross country, jumped, and still did well on my GRE's and got into the grad school of my choice, which incidentally was in another ski town, Flagstaff Arizona. I had even less time there, but I still got my degree, and coached some high school racers and skied backcountry and powder whenever I could. I got a job in Geology when I graduated, and again, I insisted on one in ski country, and found it.

Now, can anyone explain to me why I shouldn't have put skiing as one of my primary criteria for picking a school? It is the one time in your life when you have some real freedom on where you live. I can't see that I didn't get what I wanted out of each school I attended. Why on earth would I have missed all that skiing?

I had no idea what I would major in. My first Geology class included trips to glaciers, various Alps, mines, caves, etc. Someone told me my father was thrilled that I sounded as enthused about Geology as the skiing. Heck, I probably wouldn't have found that major if it wasn't in ski country. Skiers belong in ski country, where they'll make contacts and learn about the areas they'll be happiest living in after school.
I'm not trying to be a jerk, but you say you cut your skiing back 40% and went from outstanding to average.

Obviously one university was more demanding than the other, and likely provided a better education. Perhaps if you'd cut back 100% you might have remained outstanding, but it's a matter of personal priorities.

It depends on why you study, but a lot of it depends on what you study, too, I suppose.

I just can't imagine any serious Humanities student, for example, being able to ski 50 days a year - unless maybe they were in the performing or visual arts and got by on massive talent. There's just too much reading and writing to be done.

If you aren't there to learn and just want to scrape by, I guess you could - but I don't understand why anyone would sacrifice the chance at enriching their lives with a good education.

I love skiing as much as anyone here, but the fact is you're very unlikely to have time later in your life for dedicated study of Shakespeare, Plato, Thucydides, et al, with experts in their work - but you'll (probably) always be able to ski.
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
I'm not trying to be a jerk, but you say you cut your skiing back 40% and went from outstanding to average.
If you aren't there to learn and just want to scrape by I guess you could - but I don't understand why anyone would sacrifice the chance at enriching their lives with a good education.
I went from outstanding at a school which took anyone who could pay and 40% didn't speak English as a first language to being average at a very competitive school. I don't think you can say I scraped by. I received offers for full teaching and research grants from several graduate programs. I hardly see a BS from Colby with two majors as sacrificing a chance for a good education.

I will say, that I learned as much at the party school as the fancy school. It is, in the end, up to the student.

I'm sure humanities can keep you busy reading. So can organic chemistry and structural geology. One semester I had six afternoon labs a week. Six? Yes I had to miss one and make it up. Except when we had a race in Vermont, and left Thursday, then I had to make up several of them. Class all morning, lab all afternoon, run a few gates under the lights, study on the way to the ski race. Chug some beers, sleep five hours, start again.

I'm not the first person to mix sports and school. It can be done, and I would tell anyone going off to college, skiing was the best part of it all.

I wouldn't even look at a school not in ski country. There will be time for compromise in the working world.
post #41 of 46
I went to Cornell. Learned to ski at Greek Peak for gym credit.
(Bus, rental equip, lessons, lift ticket included).
Even though they were bad rentals, bad lessons, and bad conditions, I was still hooked.

Hmmm... Dartmouth might be a better choice.
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I went from outstanding at a school which took anyone who could pay and 40% didn't speak English as a first language to being average at a very competitive school. I don't think you can say I scraped by.
And I didn't.
Not everything I wrote was about you, just the first three sentences.
post #43 of 46
I'm about to graduate from Northeastern University in Boston. Since I'm orignally from Boston it wasn't that hard of a decision. Good skiing is only 2-3 hours away, plus you get to attend school in a world-class city, if not the world class city for higher education. Besides, for a college student, this is the place to be. Great social/nightlife, excellent museums, major sports teams, awesome food, diversity, and city living in a moderately safe atmosphere. Did I mention this is the college mecca? Meaning lots and lots of college girls/guys or whatever you're into. I averaged 15-20 days a year of skiing, but this year since I'm graduating I fixed my schedule so that I have classes only 3 days a week. I got in just over 30 days this year, driving from Boston.
post #44 of 46
Boston is tough to beat for a good balance. There are small places with night skiing and major resorts not too far north. My sister was at Tufts, and whenever we got Maine small town claustrophobia we headed to Boston. My father started skiing while at MIT, and several Boston schools, including MIT have ski teams. I know a few years ago MIT had more different intercollegiate sports than any school in the nation. Dumb jock school if there ever was, I mean, why do they even bother if they aren't totally dedicated to learning?



(sorry oldschool, not trying to be a jerk either, I just couldn't resist )
post #45 of 46
I recommend Saint Michaels College-- it's 5 minutes outside of Burlington VT. There are 5 or 6 awesome areas within 45 minutes and it's a great school as well. Also-- you get a $25 season pass to Smuggs. Not too bad, eh? It has good academics there as well.
post #46 of 46
Hey newfydog,

I too went to Colby (class of '02) and majored in geology (except I did my abroad work in New Zealand). How does one go about getting a geology job in Fernie (I currently work as an engineering geologist for the New York DOT)? If a job were available, I would move in approximately 2.5 seconds.
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