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Skiing colleges

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
So I'm starting to think about colleges now, and I want a college that has great skiing near by. Any suggestions? I've got my eye on Montana State out in Bozemen Montana, because of Big Sky. Any other ideas for colleges near by big resorts?
post #2 of 46
Welcome. You might want to search here -- http://forums.epicski.com/search.php -- for a number of threads on this question.
post #3 of 46
It may not be the answer your parents are looking for, but there is always Colorado Mountain College. It's a 2-year college with many locations including Breck, Aspen, Steamboat, and Vail. The key would be to switch majors every year so you are never expected to actually graduate. You could start with something like Ski Area Operations and then switch to Professional Fly Fishing Guide the next year. The possibilities are endless.
post #4 of 46
Not that you'll likely want to here this, and I'm sure I'll take some heat for it here, but shouldn't your college descision be based on academics first, not your ability to take advantage of as many days as possible on your college discount season pass??? Find a school where a) you feel comfortable b) it has not just an isolated area of courses in what you think you want to major in now, but also a broad number of areas(nobody ever changes their major: ) and then if it happens to be near a ski area, great. If you have to drive a bit, no big deal.

If you get a solid education now in an academic area that you enjoy, you'll be suprised at how long term that will end up with you getting more ski days at a greater diversity of ski areas than if you look at college as a chance to get as many days in now and worry about the rest of your life later.

Myself, personally, I went to Renssealer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY (I had some smaller areas in the Berkshires 30 minutes a way, and anywhere in Vermont could be reached within a 4 hour drive (Mt Snow was an hour, Killington 2 hours, Stowe 3 hours and Jay Peak 4 hours). I averaged 20 days a season in college(essentially all in the East). Now that I'm out in the real world for almost 15 years now (man I'm feeling old typing that!), because I went to a school where I received a first rate education in an area I enjoy, it has allowed me professionally to do quite well, and hence I now am able to have the time and financial resources to average 40 days a year (with on average a couple of trips West each year to supplement my New England based home days).

On the flip side, there are quite a few both strong academic schools with decent proximity to Eastern ski areas that exist. UVM, Dartmouth, Colby, etc.
post #5 of 46
Sadly, jasdmd0 gives some good advice. I have followed much the same path. I would add that you should really worry about where to live/work *after* you graduate and get a job -- that's when it matters! You'll have more time and more $$. That's the time to relocate to Montana!
post #6 of 46
Why not work at a ski resort and study at the same time if you got the power? :P

As far as speaking of academical stuff the ivy league college called Dartmouth in New Hampshire - near ski resorts ofc...
I know I would like to go there if I had the opportunity!
post #7 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkSkier View Post
So I'm starting to think about colleges now, and I want a college that has great skiing near by. Any suggestions? I've got my eye on Montana State out in Bozemen Montana, because of Big Sky. Any other ideas for colleges near by big resorts?
FWIW, if you end up at Montana State, you'll probably ski at Bridger Bowl a lot more, since it's right in Bozeman. I know someone who went there, and loved it.
post #8 of 46

college budget

If you are going to be on the average college budget you may also want to look for Colleges and Universities near good ski areas as opposed to resorts. They are ussually alot cheaper, skiing can be as good if not better than resorts, are typically less crowded on weekdays leaving the option to run up after class and ski instead of wait in line and as for acedemics, it's really hard to study between runs on a high speed quad. Look for an area with cheap passes close to town and at least one old school chair lift with no line so you can ride single and study your notes. Bridger would be one, and I would weigh more heavily on this option than Big Sky. The thought of getting out of class and heading up the Canyon to catch a few runs does not appeal to me, and forget the weekends at Big Sky or any other resort, too crowded. I would look for something more like Bridger where you can get out of class around noon ski weekday afternoons and stay at home weekends and study and write papers while everyone else is skiing. ( or schedule mwf classes and ski all day tue and thurs )
post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasdmd0 View Post
Not that you'll likely want to here this, and I'm sure I'll take some heat for it here, but shouldn't your college descision be based on academics first, not your ability to take advantage of as many days as possible on your college discount season pass??? Find a school where a) you feel comfortable b) it has not just an isolated area of courses in what you think you want to major in now, but also a broad number of areas(nobody ever changes their major: ) and then if it happens to be near a ski area, great. If you have to drive a bit, no big deal.
I think 'a' and 'b' are great suggestions, in that order. But I think there are enough schools in ski country that, if it matters to you, you can safely add skiing to your requirements in narrowing down your list.

Quote:
If you get a solid education now in an academic area that you enjoy, you'll be suprised at how long term that will end up with you getting more ski days at a greater diversity of ski areas than if you look at college as a chance to get as many days in now and worry about the rest of your life later.
Yep. On the other hand, your college years will give you lots of free days that you can spend skiing if you're in the right place.

Quote:
On the flip side, there are quite a few both strong academic schools with decent proximity to Eastern ski areas that exist. UVM, Dartmouth, Colby, etc.
Yep again. I went to Dartmouth, and I got lots of skiing in. The school has its own small ski area, with a bus to and from campus and very cheap student rates on tickets or season passes. As a bonus, you can take ski lessons, teach ski lessons, or do ski patrol for gym credit.

But depending on what NYS is after in terms of "great skiing" and "near by", he might have already ruled out the entire East Coast.

NYS, do you want to give more details about what you're looking for, both in terms of the kind of skiing you want and what else you want to find in a college?
post #10 of 46
in canada UBC and Simon Fraser are 2-2.5 hours to whistler, much closer to the north shore.
U of Calgary is 1.25 hours to banff.
If you have a car these would be good options.

Colorado-boulder and UC Davis seem like good american choices.
post #11 of 46
@ UofC you dont even need a car to get out to sunshine/Lakelouise. They run a ski bus up daily and its fairly cheap. I went up for 60 bucks including a lift ticket and return trip.

As a side note I'm also in a similar situation looking for a university. Although its not a firm rule my preference (both financially and academically) would be to stay north of the border. Like you I've been debating whether to include proximity to a ski hill as criteria. I've been told this is a terrible idea because I wont have time. However, the best part of the week is the time I get to spend on the slopes so I dunno if I want to lose this. For me staying @ home and going to U of C is my most likely course of action.
post #12 of 46
Do not, under any circumstances, come to school in philadelphia for the skiing. The only 'skiing' advantage here is that it's a very short trip from center city to the airport...

That said, almost any school in connecticut, RI, Boston, NY north of the city, etc will have some semblance of a ski team or club and ample ski areas within driving distance. University of Rhode Island, for instance, has a fairly well funded ski club, as do Brandeis, Wesleyan, and many others in the area. I managed to ski 2-3 days a week through most of the winter in college in vt, coming from s. connecticut. I never knew how well off I was until I encountered the skiing black hole that is philadelphia.

The upshot of going to school in the northeast is that many/most of the country's (world's?) best schools are up here, as are many of the most significant (by many measures) cities in the world. Montana's beautiful and I'll make my way out there to live one day, but to not apply to schools in the whole NE because of a lack of skiing is might well be doing a disservice to your future.

by the way, don't listen to people who say that skiing should not factor into your college decision. Your environment will matter to you, and putting your education first (as you should) doesn't mean that nothing else matters (it does). Driving a couple of hours won't ruin you or your college experience, but living in phoenix just might.
post #13 of 46
I would join and xpost on tgr for a different perspective on combining school and skiing.
post #14 of 46
I go to school @ WVU... Some of the best Mid Atlantic skiing is within driving range... I have a lot of friends up here that bought Subarus (decent gas mileage + awd) and ski most weekends... Wisp is 45 mins, Canaan Valley is an hour and a half... Easy to get jobs as instructors there too if you are a decent skier..

I work at CV on weekends and can ski for free at Wisp, T-line, Snowshoe.... Only expense is gas to get to work and equipment... the rest can help pay for school.

Not to mention that WVU is a pretty rad university... lots of programs... not too expensive...
post #15 of 46
You still have some time so I would suggest: work hard/play hard. Prepare yourself now so you can get into a good school and ski a lot.

I went to UVM and skied a lot and I'm glad - could have learned more though:

And welcome.
post #16 of 46
I went to school at Penn in Philadelphia, and I can promise you that it is flat for miles and miles around. Also, the Pocono Mts are not that great.

You should decide what you want to study and then look at the various schools around. I don't know if anyone has mentioned University of Utah here, but that would be another school in ski country.

Also, in the East there is University of Vermont.
post #17 of 46
On this subject, I have in the past thrown in a plug for Dartmouth (at least for the small portion of the population who can get in to it), though I didn't go there or anything myself. So it's good to have someone who actually did speak up for it.

Plus, you've got to be impressed by a small, very academic school that can win an NCAA title without any athletic scholarships (and with some of the best racers among its student body disqualified as professionals, not to mention busy racing in Europe and thereabouts).
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasdmd0 View Post
Not that you'll likely want to here this, and I'm sure I'll take some heat for it here, but shouldn't your college descision be based on academics first,

On the flip side, there are quite a few both strong academic schools with decent proximity to Eastern ski areas that exist. UVM, Dartmouth, Colby, etc.

I started to disagree, but I went to Colby.

Did a year at The American College of Switzerland though. Now that was a ski school!


http://www.american-college.com/front_content.php
post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I started to disagree, but I went to Colby.
For those who don't know, Colby is in Maine, not too far from Sugarloaf. I'd call that a skiing school especially since there isn't much else to do there:

If you are looking for a great east coast school in ski country, put Colby on the list.
post #20 of 46
Yeah, when I was at Colby the record time to Sugarloaf was 47 minutes. That was not too sane for 60 miles of rural roads, but it was done by indestructable college students.

We also had a ski hill on campus with a t-bar, snowmaking and night skiing, but it has since closed up. Two recent grads are on the US B-team.

True, there isn't much else to do up there!
post #21 of 46
All good colleges. All HARD to get into. Dartmouth? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH! Whew.

Sorry you guys had to go to Colby (Bowdoin '91)

Grad school at Middlebury in VT. VERY VERY NICE. Have their own ski area (teeny). Hey don't foget the 100 or sol schools in BOSTON. 45 minutes to Wachusett and about 2 Hrs to North Conway et al.

How are your grades?
post #22 of 46

skibummin through college

I dropped out of school to ski one season and boy was I blessed, great winter but as to school and skiing it is cheaper out west to go to a University than what you will spend back East and the skiing is bigger. My second Univeristy was in Pocatello, ID local ski hill where you can even take ski lessons for credit and you have all of Salt Lake skiing 3 hours out, Sun Valley 2.5 hrs, Grand Targhee and Jackson 3hrs, and snowbasin 2hrs. They even provide you with a degree when done.
post #23 of 46
Actually, any college in Mass near I-91 is a fairly short hop to VT for skiing. I went to Western New England College (WNEC) in Springfield. In addition to the smaller areas in Mass (Jiminy, Bousqet, Brodie *rip*, Berk East -- all great for cheap night skiing), Mt. Snow and Haystack were right up the road. Magic, Bromley, Stratton, and Okemo were not much further, and Pico/K-mart were not too bad of a drive. I drove past most of them to Sugarbush and MRG whenever I could, but most of my ski days were at the southern and central VT resorts. I got about 15 days a year my first three years in college, then upped to 40+ my senior year (had a light spring semester). I took a ski class for PE credits both sophomore and senior year, and that was a blast (and probably the best set of ski lessons I got right when they were most needed).
post #24 of 46
I would think in terms of cities that have universities with skiing nearby. Out west and in no particular order, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas NM, Durango, Gunnison, Boulder, Denver, Ft Collins, Bozeman, Missoula, SLC, Provo, Flagstaff, Pocatello, Boise, Reno, Spokane, and I'm sure several others that I've missed.
For instance, in Spokane, you are 90 mins from 4 ski areas, one with night skiing within about 45 mins. None of the skiing is epic, but pretty good at Schweitzer and Silver. So figure out what you want to major in, how much you or your parents want to spend, and go from there. You're looking at $$$ in all scenarios, because of out of state tuition and or private college. OTOH, you could select a place and establish residency (usually a year) then enroll.

Birddog
post #25 of 46
My son chose RIT. School first, skiing second.
post #26 of 46

Hmmmmmmmm,,, 26 years ago, I was thinking the same way.

Went to Bozeman, graduated in five years with an engineering degree from MSU and a degree ski partyology from UofBB. If you come this way, Bridger is 16 miles from Campus, Big Sky/Moonlight is 50. If you want affordable, Bridger is around $500 for an everyday pass, BS is over $1000. If you want to take classes in the morning and ski the afternoon away, it becomes a logical choice and enrolment at MSU/UBB just went up by one..
post #27 of 46
Nobody has brought up the University of Utah. It's a great school and you are a half an hour from skiing. Plus you can take classes in skiing for credits or be a ski instructor for the school if qualified. On different days you can ski Brighton, Solitude, Snowbird, or Alta, my favorite. On top of that it is the best place to ski in America.
post #28 of 46
WesternState College in Gunnison, whose motto on their t-shirts is "ski Western State and earn a degree in your spare time". I did, and it's 30 miles from Crested Butte or a little longer to Monarch. Student pass discounts may still be available. Go Mountaineers!!
post #29 of 46
Univeristy of Denver. Hour and a half to Loveland, Winter Park, Arapahoe Basin, Eldora, Keystone, Breckenridge, and Copper. Great school, strong academics. And, some of the best NCAA skiers in the nation
post #30 of 46
Quote:
And, some of the best NCAA skiers in the nation
Should that say some of the best NCAA skiers from other nations?
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