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Summer Binding Position

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
What do you folks do with your bindings when skiing is done for the year? Do you set the DIN to zero? What position do you leave the bindings in? I overheard some discussion the other day and it included releasing all pressure on the springs. Your thoughts please. Thanks
post #2 of 14
Sometimes I just leave em adjusted so I don't have to readjust them the next fall, but I do engage the heel down in the rear. When the binding is cocked it applies more pressure to the spring.
post #3 of 14
I asked a spring expert, and he thought it might be a good idea to back the settings off to take the load off the *other* parts of the bindings, but it won't make a notable difference for the metal springs themselves in our lifetime.

Myself, I don't do a thing to them, never have. I don't recall seeing any storage procedures like this in the binding tech manuals either. It sure can't hurt though, so if in doubt, back them off.
post #4 of 14
I always have the intention of setting them to zero but I forget that step as often as I remember it. I also forget to reset them before my first run every year I remember to back them off. I am reminded as soon as I skate out of them on the way to the lift =)

Chris
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
I always have the intention of setting them to zero but I forget that step as often as I remember it. I also forget to reset them before my first run every year I remember to back them off. I am reminded as soon as I skate out of them on the way to the lift =)

Chris
I used to adjust them down every spring, until I forgot to re-adjust a pair on my GS boards for a speed event. Hit a rut as I neared the finish line, and watched the DIN 6 binding pop off. I tried to slow down on 1 ski, but fell instead, and went though the traps, on my back, at 72 MPH!!!:
I didn't get hurt, but that Volkl P9 bent when it hit the snow bank on the side of the trail.

Now I just leave them adjusted.....
post #6 of 14
I don't adjust the DIN down (for some of the reasons listed) but I do push the heel binding down to release some of the compression on the spring.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzz View Post
Sometimes I just leave em adjusted so I don't have to readjust them the next fall, but I do engage the heel down in the rear. When the binding is cocked it applies more pressure to the spring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gandalf View Post
I don't adjust the DIN down (for some of the reasons listed) but I do push the heel binding down to release some of the compression on the spring.
Ok, I am confused. Does it add more or less pressure to the spring?
post #8 of 14
There is no need to zero the din. It is reccomended to store the bindings in the position you ski them in, or being clicked in. This is the position in which the springs are relaxed. I do this just as I do not store a SLR camera with the shutter cocked or my good rifles with the firing pin cocked. I never feel it is good to store a spring in it's compressed state.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
I asked a spring expert, and he thought it might be a good idea to back the settings off to take the load off the *other* parts of the bindings, but it won't make a notable difference for the metal springs themselves in our lifetime.

Myself, I don't do a thing to them, never have. I don't recall seeing any storage procedures like this in the binding tech manuals either. It sure can't hurt though, so if in doubt, back them off.
I don't back them down either. There have been many (as in many,many) discussions every spring (ha) here on this subject. At least one thread includes a scholarly discussion of spring mechanics. The conclusion was that backing down the DIN does not prolong the effective life of the binding spring's function. If you want to do it it probably won't hurt so long as you remember to reset them correctly next season before use. But neither will it help in any demonstrable way.
post #10 of 14
Ullr:

In the 'ski' position the spring is released to exert pressure on the boot. When you push down on the ski binding release handle, something inside compresses the spring to take the pressure off of the boot. So in the 'ski' position with no boot in the binding is the least pressure.

Given modern materials, I'm actually skeptical that it really makes any difference at all, but it was recommended in the Tyrolia documentation that came with one set of bindings.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
As the originator of this thread, and having been on and off skis for well over 35 years, I have NEVER messed with any binding position or have NEVER set the DIN to zero at the end of the ski season. But as I was sitting in a restaurant in Ketchum, Idaho after my annual Sun Valley trip and overheard a fellow telling some folks how to put their skis away for the summer, I couldn't help but wonder if I had not been doing some important maintenance function all these years. That's why I asked the question and am quite heartened by the answers. Thanks for all your replies.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilbur View Post
As the originator of this thread, and having been on and off skis for well over 35 years, I have NEVER messed with any binding position or have NEVER set the DIN to zero at the end of the ski season. But as I was sitting in a restaurant in Ketchum, Idaho after my annual Sun Valley trip and overheard a fellow telling some folks how to put their skis away for the summer, I couldn't help but wonder if I had not been doing some important maintenance function all these years. That's why I asked the question and am quite heartened by the answers. Thanks for all your replies.
Geez, next you will be telling me I don't need to store them with wooden blocks between them to help the camber!:
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
Geez, next you will be telling me I don't need to store them with wooden blocks between them to help the camber!:
...And you can toss out that boot tree also....
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
But you do need to put them in a nitrogen rich, vacumm sealed chamber, with blue spectrum lighting and the temperature maintained at -5 celsius until November 23rd!
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