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ACL tear, surgery, & rehab diary - Page 7

post #181 of 245
I haven't posted for a while, but I too am almost at the 5 month mark.

Stairs are almost back to normal, if I've been on my knee for a better part of the day then I can tell I need to be more careful on stairs. but for the most part all is well, I started jogging, which requires me to ice my knee after but its nice to start to feel normal again. I even manage to jog up the stairs while I get ready in the mornings, is just one step closer!

its funny to hear about skiing next month, here in the east we're lucky to ski by thanksgiving, but it is a possibility even though I won't be able to partake until mid december
post #182 of 245
its good to hear everyone else is progressing nicely.

Congrats guys the light at the end of the tunnel is starting to get brighter!
post #183 of 245
Yeah Mike it's not really that bad I guess. It's gotten me back on a bike for the first time in years and I'm kinda enjoying that since it's been long enough that I have no expectations for performance of any kind. Of course a bike strengthens both legs, even tho I try to focus on the weak one, so I've actually noticed significant size increase in my non-op leg too! Lol, I'll never catch up that way.

Not planning to do anything fancy in the future for rehab. Just more biking, weights, treadmill, and dancing (not kidding, that really helps).

Switch, I'm in the east also, so skiing next month was more theoretical than practical, without travel at least.
post #184 of 245
Thread Starter 
One thing I noticed: I stopped working out the knee for about 4 weeks -- my knee stiffness and patella-femoral pain completely vanished. Now that I've started working it again, the PF pain is back (but at a much lower level) but the stiffness is still about 99% gone.
post #185 of 245

Going to the doc on Monday

A quick update - I'm seeing my doctor (I haven't seen him for two months) to discuss when I will start skiing. As one of our ski school's training staff, I need to be skiing in late November and my doctor is a conservative guy and doesn't want me to start until mid to late-December.

I'm pretty comfortable that I could ski today even though the leg is probably only 90% back, and can definitely do what we need to do in our training clinics, a lot of which is reviewing the progression and having our trainees practice teach.

I'll just stick to groomed greens and blues for awhile and let the leg get used to skiing again.

Mike

PS - How many of you are going to ski with a brace?
post #186 of 245
Almost a year since my tibia plateau fracture and surgery. My leg feels strong but I do intend to ski with a brace this season, as I did last season when I returned to skiing.

It may be mental but I feel it may do some physical good, especially when I get in the bumps (which I plan to avoid when possible!) or get to ski powder (which I plan to do as much as possible! - didn't do much of that last season, just stuck to the groomed!)
post #187 of 245

OK to ski!

I met my doctor yesterday who gave me an OK to start skiing (and doing any other cutting activity) as long as I ski with a brace for at least the first year. I've seen some debates about whether a brace is necessary. My doctor referred to the following study and suggested that it is advisable:

Effect of Functional Bracing on Knee Injury in ACL-Reconstructed Professional Skiers: A Prospective Cohort Study
William I. Sterett, MD, Karen K. Briggs, MPH, Timothy D. Farley, MD, Richard Steadman, MD

Purpose:
To determine the effect of functional bracing on subsequent knee injury in the ACL-reconstructed (ACLr) professional skier.
Methods:
ACLr skiers (minimum 2 yrs post reconstruction) were identified in a preseason screening program at a ski resort. Braces were recommended or not recommended based on physician counseling. Injuries were determined by worker’s compensation claims.
Results:
820 ACLr skiers were identified (257 braced/563 nonbraced) over 6 seasons. At preseason screening, ACLr skiers had significantly higher rates of abnormal Lachman and pivot shift exams (p<0.05). 61 knee injuries were identified in the non-braced group and 10 in the braced group. Non-braced ACLr skiers were 2.74 times more likely to suffer subsequent injury than braced skiers (OR=2.74[CI:1.2 to 4.9]).
Conclusion:
Because of the increased risk of subsequent knee injury in non-braced skiers, we recommend functional bracing for ACLr skiers with increased instability.

While I'm not excited about a brace, based on these conclusions it's pretty hard to deny that one should reduce the risk of reinjury.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to giving my knee a workout on the slopes in the next couple of weeks.

Mike
post #188 of 245
I haven't been planning to use anything other than a rudimentary neoprene sleeve over my knee. My doc didn't recommend a brace, but then we all know my doc's track record by now, lol. His logic is that the important forces acting on the acl are the twisting ones, and there is really no effective way to stop a leg (a cylinder in effect) from twisting with an external brace.

But I'm a data-driven guy and that study is interesting. I'd need to dig into the details, but the results certainly don't appear to be marginal in any way. One question it didn't seem to answer was whether an aclr knee was more likely to be injured than a non-aclr knee. I guess that's just a given or proven in a butt-load of other studies, but I'd like to know how much more likely it was. I would also like to know the effect of having a pre-season abnormal lachman or pivot-shift on the probability of being injured.

My first probable trip is not until December 14 weekend, so I've got a little more time to rehab. Can mountain bike and dance my ass off in the clubs without thinking about the knee at all currently.
post #189 of 245
[quote=Velodog2;784444]One question it didn't seem to answer was whether an aclr knee was more likely to be injured than a non-aclr knee. I guess that's just a given or proven in a butt-load of other studies, but I'd like to know how much more likely it was. I would also like to know the effect of having a pre-season abnormal lachman or pivot-shift on the probability of being injured.
quote]


Here's some more data I drummed up. If you search for "abnormal lachman or pivot-shift" you'll find lots of references:


The second article (Kocher et al) we read was another study involving skiers with ACL-deficient knees. Kocher et al studied 180 subjects, considerably more than Nemeth et al. We hoped that this larger number of subjects would strengthen the conclusions that Kocher et al discussed.

Kocher MS, Sterett WI, Briggs KK, Zurakowski D, Steadman JR. Effect of functional bracing on subsequent knee injury in ACL–deficient professional skiers.

J Knee Surg. 2003 Apr;16(2):87–92.
The effect of functional bracing on subsequent knee injury in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient professional skiers was evaluated. A cohort of 180 ACL-deficient skiers was identified from a knee screening of 9410 professional skiers from 1991–1997. An ACL-deficient knee was defined by an abnormal examination (Lachman or pivot-shift) and a 5-mm KT - 1000 manual maximum difference. The dependent variable was subsequent knee injury, which occurred in 12 knees. A significantly higher proportion of injuries occurred in nonbraced skiers compared with braced skiers (P=.005). The risk ratio for subsequent knee injury comparing nonbraced with braced skiers was 6.4 (13% and 2%, respectively). Univariate analysis revealed no significant effects of the other covariates. Logistic regression identified bracing status (P<.01; odds ratio=8) and KT-1000 manual maximum difference (P=.02; odds ratio=1.3) as significant multivariate risk factors for subsequent knee injury, controlling for covariates.
[© 2003 Slack Inc. Abstract reprinted with permission of Slack Inc.]
This study took place from 1991 to 1997 at a major ski resort where a total of 9,410 employees who were professional skiers underwent annual screening exams for their knees. Of the 9,410 subjects screened, 180 skiers had an ACL-deficient knee, as defined in the abstract. Their mean age was 38.6 years. Because our 47-year-old patient had an ACL-deficient knee with abnormal Lachman test results, we felt that he was similar in age and knee pathology to the subjects studied in this article. The study participants skied a minimum of 80 days per season, which was substantially more than our patient expected to ski.
After skiers were determined to have an ACL-deficient knee, the researchers conferred with a physician, who considered individual preference and willingness to wear an FKB in making a bracing decision. Based on physician recommendations, 101 skiers received a custom-fit knee brace, and 79 skiers did not receive a brace. The braced and unbraced skiers did not differ in age, occupation, or results of Lachman or pivot shift tests. The braced skiers, however, demonstrated greater laxity on instrumented testing than nonbraced skiers. Any subsequent knee injury, defined as an injury that prevented the person from working, was traced through workers' compensation claims. The results of the study showed that the skiers who were not braced had a higher proportion of subsequent knee injuries than the braced skiers did. Two of the 101 braced skiers and 10 of the 79 unbraced skiers sustained subsequent knee injuries, which corresponded to a risk of subsequent knee injury that was 6.4 times higher for nonbraced skiers. Despite the fact that instrumented testing indicated greater laxity in the group that was braced, the group that was unbraced had more knee injuries.


Mike
post #190 of 245
Yeah, but in both studies, the common thread appears to be increased joint laxity... If you've had ACL reconstruction and you have joint laxity, then your ACL reconstruction did not go so well to begin with. The increase in joint laxity would, in and of itself, be a risk factor for subsequent injury. It would be more interesting to see a study where the relative laxity between operated and non-operated knees were compared and THEN those patients were randomized into a brace or no-brace group. My operated knee is actually now more stable then my non-operated one. I'm a year and a half post-op. I'll be wearing a brace for high torque skiing such as wet powder and bumps, but will forgo it for other activities. Having had several partial meniscectomies and several braces, I can tell you from personal experience that the best derotational braces do not completely simulate the complex movement about the knee, particularly when going into almost full extension. If you watch your leg as you slowly extend it, in about the last 15 degrees there is a slight relative rotation of the tibia under the femur. Braces do not allow for this. I would always get more of an effusion on the days when I wore my brace than when I did not wear it, and I assume that's because the brace slightly "anti-torques" your knee as you fully extend, in a way that is not quite physiologic. Over the course of hundreds of these repetitive "anti-torques" in a day, the stress adds up on the joint. Clearly, however, when the knee is partially flexed and a rotational force is applied (such as a sharp avoid-a-crash turn in wet powder) it is better to have a derotational brace than not....IMHO.
post #191 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiedoc View Post
Yeah, but in both studies, the common thread appears to be increased joint laxity...
Yes, that was my impression also. I thought someone with an aclr was not automatically considered 'acl deficient' any longer. But at some point you start to split hairs. The disadvantages mentioned by Doogie not withstanding, bracing does appear to have a positive effect on injury rates. I probably still won't use one, at least until I see how things feel, just because I'm stubborn like that.

Have any of you (other than Doogie) had your operated knee tested for remaining laxity? I'd love to know with mine, but after all I went through I'm kinda scared also. The doc pushes and pulls and says 'nice and tight' and that's it.
post #192 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velodog2 View Post
Yes, that was my impression also. I thought someone with an aclr was not automatically considered 'acl deficient' any longer...

Have any of you (other than Doogie) had your operated knee tested for remaining laxity? I'd love to know with mine, but after all I went through I'm kinda scared also. The doc pushes and pulls and says 'nice and tight' and that's it.
I agree. The whole point of getting ACL repair is so that you aren't 'acl deficient' anymore. Notwithstanding, the tensile strength of repair (ability to resist shear-type injury) is dependent to some degree on the type of graft (autografts are theoretically stronger than allografts until about 2 years out). Once you are 'engrafted' (i.e. your graft has revascularized) and you are now using the graft as a lattice upon which to build your own collagen, you should be ready to rock. Another thing those studies neglected to factor in was whether the subjects had other reasons for instability, such as partial meniscectomies, etc. Bottom line, IMHO: if it feels strong and you have the courage and your doc says you're ready, bracing is really a personal decision based as much upon your willingness to accept risk that you may have to go through this process all over again.
When I'm in the bumps or pow, I tend to forget about everything else and focus on the moment. I consider the brace as a tactile reminder in those situations. Likewise, if I'm forced to ski on a crowded run where a bunch of idiots might slam into me, I'll probably also wear it just to prevent them from hurting me...same reason I wear a helmet. As for the testing, it is kinda bizarre to sit in that machine and have it pull and tug and torque your leg, but it was quite reassuring to have a strain gauge confirm the doc saying "nice and tight." I sleep better at night!:
post #193 of 245
Doggiedoc,

I tend to agree with you.

Everyone I know (and I assume I will end up the same eventually) feel that their surgically repaired knee is the stronger knee, and my doctor has a national reputation having been working with sports teams and ski team members for nearly 20 years. If my leg is ultimately going to be stronger than the old, a brace is a matter of personal choice.

At the same time, I'm starting skiing only 6 months post-op, and while the ACL might be strong, the overall strength and flexibility in my repaired knee is still a work in progress.

I plan on starting with a brace for peace of mind, and going from there. Sound reasonable?

Mike
post #194 of 245
I certainly wouldn't at this point argue against wearing a brace mike, for whatever reason you might personally have. As I mentioned, regardless of what the other variables were in those studies you cited, one conclusion I can draw is that a brace is certainly not useless.

So do any of you currently feel that your operated knee is your 'stronger' one? I'd heard that before as well and am curious as hell to know what that means. Can't say I feel I'm quite there, yet anyways.
post #195 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmckimson View Post
Doggiedoc,

I tend to agree with you.

Everyone I know (and I assume I will end up the same eventually) feel that their surgically repaired knee is the stronger knee, and my doctor has a national reputation having been working with sports teams and ski team members for nearly 20 years. If my leg is ultimately going to be stronger than the old, a brace is a matter of personal choice.

At the same time, I'm starting skiing only 6 months post-op, and while the ACL might be strong, the overall strength and flexibility in my repaired knee is still a work in progress.

I plan on starting with a brace for peace of mind, and going from there. Sound reasonable?

Mike
That's exactly what I did the first season, as I too commenced skiing at precisely the six month mark. Definitely peace of mind thing was going on for me as well. (Ironically, the brace didn't arrive from DonJoy until two days after I had already started skiing---so I actually skied-VERY carefully mind you-without it at first with no issues!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Velodog2 View Post
I certainly wouldn't at this point argue against wearing a brace mike, for whatever reason you might personally have. As I mentioned, regardless of what the other variables were in those studies you cited, one conclusion I can draw is that a brace is certainly not useless.

So do any of you currently feel that your operated knee is your 'stronger' one? I'd heard that before as well and am curious as hell to know what that means. Can't say I feel I'm quite there, yet anyways.
The machine and the doc both suggest that my operated knee has less laxity than my non-operated one, so in one regard it is "stronger". However, my non-operated knee is still stronger physically for two reasons: First, I hurt my non-dominant knee which was never as strong to begin with; Second, I have been doing identical "rehab" exercises on my non-op knee which has become a friggin' tree trunk and the operated knee is still playing "catch-up". However, it feels stronger than it did before surgery because I have been exercising so much.
post #196 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiedoc View Post
Second, I have been doing identical "rehab" exercises on my non-op knee which has become a friggin' tree trunk and the operated knee is still playing "catch-up". However, it feels stronger than it did before surgery because I have been exercising so much.
Bingo! As I have rehabbed, the non-injured leg has gotten about 25% stronger / larger as I do the exercises recommended by by trainer. I realize my injured leg will catch up, but it sure seems to take awhile!

Mike :
post #197 of 245
Had my ACL & MCL both complete tears, repaired on April 13th 2006. Skied on 11/28/06 for the first time. Did not use a brace. Doctor told me it was solid as a rock use one if you want to, but you don't need to.

I was going to, but could not find it. Nervous at first but went fine.

Looking forward to snow.
post #198 of 245
Thread Starter 
So for those who have had ACL reconstructions and have gone back to skiing, how did your operated knee feel compared to your non-operated one when you first returned to skiing? In terms of strength, mobility/flexibility, and any pain?

I'm about 7 months post-op right now, and am planning to get back on skis in about 2 or 3 weeks. Both my PT and doc said that the ligament is tight and strong enough for me to get back to skiing. The only question mark is whether my muscles have recovered enough to take any sudden movements or pressure.
  • Strength: My operated leg is probably about 80-85% of my good leg in terms of strength.
  • Flexibility/mobility: There's no difference between the two.
  • Pain: The biggest difference is in the patella pain in the operated knee on squatting.
I can do one-legged hops on the operated knee without any problems (although not as high as on my good leg). Jumping of different kinds are okay (forward-backward, side-to-side, 180-degrees -- although I can tell that I'm slightly favoring the good leg on landing). Because of the squatting pain, I can't do very deep squat jumps.

Personally, I feel reasonably confident that my knee will be okay if ski groomers tomorrow. And if I build up strength for 2-3 more weeks, then it'll be even better. But it will probably not be back to 100%.

So my question for those of you who have done it: did your knee/leg feel 100% when you returned to skiing? Or were there certain aspects that were still less than 100%?
post #199 of 245
I took it easy most of last season. I got more aggresive towards the end. We did not have much of a beginning. By the end of last year I felt as good as any year. I don't ski moguls, never did though. The leg felt fine. Mentally I was nervous to wipe out again.
post #200 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy View Post
So for those who have had ACL reconstructions and have gone back to skiing, how did your operated knee feel compared to your non-operated one when you first returned to skiing? In terms of strength, mobility/flexibility, and any pain?

I'm about 7 months post-op right now, and am planning to get back on skis in about 2 or 3 weeks. Both my PT and doc said that the ligament is tight and strong enough for me to get back to skiing. The only question mark is whether my muscles have recovered enough to take any sudden movements or pressure.
  • Strength: My operated leg is probably about 80-85% of my good leg in terms of strength.
  • Flexibility/mobility: There's no difference between the two.
  • Pain: The biggest difference is in the patella pain in the operated knee on squatting.
I can do one-legged hops on the operated knee without any problems (although not as high as on my good leg). Jumping of different kinds are okay (forward-backward, side-to-side, 180-degrees -- although I can tell that I'm slightly favoring the good leg on landing). Because of the squatting pain, I can't do very deep squat jumps.

Personally, I feel reasonably confident that my knee will be okay if ski groomers tomorrow. And if I build up strength for 2-3 more weeks, then it'll be even better. But it will probably not be back to 100%.

So my question for those of you who have done it: did your knee/leg feel 100% when you returned to skiing? Or were there certain aspects that were still less than 100%?
First run was mentally very scary in a giddy elated way...does that make sense? It was like having a guilty pleasure knowing that you really shouldn't do that, but g*dd*ammit you're going to do it anyway. Second run, it was fine and feeling like a million bucks. Skied nine days in a row one month after getting the green light to resume, and other than feeling tired it felt like a million bucks. Note: (and they warned me about this and it seems 'spot on')...EVERY time you try a new physical endeavor, no matter how minor, your leg will bug you in some weird way for 3-4 weeks. Even something simple like swinging a golf club at a driving range will do this. You must remind yourself that this is normal, it will fix itself, just keep using it and it will go away and no, you have not re-injured yourself. Thus, when you first ski easy groomers, you will feel minor ouches and they will go away after a little while. When you first ski bumps, you will feel minor ouches, and they will go away after a little while. When you ski pow for the first time, same thing. Each time you are asking slightly different muscle groups to fire, and they have to complain for a while before they "wake up" and then they stop hurting. I mentioned a while back that I have started reffing soccer games again. OK, well, it's not like I haven't been running and doing agility drills already---I have been doing lots of those. Reffing requires lots of side skips, sudden stop/starts, backwards running, etc. So I had twinges a lot for the first month after soccer season started, and now my knee feels great again. Just remind yourself it's normal and 'this too shall pass' and your mind will be in a better place for it. (The only way to get in shape for skiing is to ski!) Hope this helps!:
post #201 of 245
wow you guys haven't been messing around since I last checked this thread...anyways hey have you all been seeing that every step you take your knee takes a step back the next day(ex. running or hiking in the woods, after words it swells up a little and is sore the next day)

Good luck to everyone...BTW I saw snow today!
post #202 of 245
In my case, not really. My knee seems to be pretty much the same all the time. The only thing I seem to notice is that injured leg gets "tired" more easily than the non-injured leg....

Snow is starting to fall here (a little anyway). I should be skiing in 2 weeks or so.

Mike
post #203 of 245
Yeah, the knee is a little more stable than that. It certainly varies some from day to day but there is not quite so much obvious cause-effect between what I do and how it feels. Most of the variation is in how the patellar tendon feels. Been trying to perceive the famous rain-predicting ability! It never swells that I can see. I'm almost 5 mos out now. Tendonitis is essentially gone and stairs are fine, up or down.

I've not been very busy actually - with the knee anyway. Really slacking on the rehab. Partly due to being busy elsewhere but also because I've started to have problems with my back again from the squats, biking, etc. The reason i originally gave up those things. I get nasty sciatica in my non-op leg. So I have to balance the rehab with the back issues. Operated leg still weaker than other, no doubt. First ski trip planned for Dec 14 weekend.
post #204 of 245

Starting to get lazy?

As my knee starts to feel more normal, I seem to be getting more lazy about going to the gym and doing my rehab exercises. I only go to the gym about 4 x per week, instead of every day as I was doing for what seemed like 4 months. I guess the good news is when I do go to the gym, I'm able to work out a lot longer and harder.

Are the rest of you starting to feel the same?

One exercise I've been doing with the Bosu ball emulates the skiing motion and I like it a lot. You start with one leg on / one leg off and then move from side to side (obviously pushing from the off leg) to the other side. As you speed up the motion, you can really get a good workout of the leg, create the sensation of using pressure control and flexion / extension movements and get a great cardio workout at the same time. If you haven't tried this exercise, I highly recommend it!

Mike :
post #205 of 245
So you are jumping from side to side, switching feet on the ball when you are doing this? I've been looking for something to simulate skiing.
post #206 of 245
Lol, nevermind, I think I understand. I will try this tonight. Thanks!
post #207 of 245
Yes the foot on the floor becomes the one on the ball when switching to to the other side. As you do this exercise, you want to "push" off the floor leg. I like to do 4 sets of 50 (25 per leg) with a 1 minute rest in between sets.

Mike
post #208 of 245

Pain...

Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy View Post
So for those who have had ACL reconstructions and have gone back to skiing, how did your operated knee feel compared to your non-operated one when you first returned to skiing? In terms of strength, mobility/flexibility, and any pain?

I'm about 7 months post-op right now, and am planning to get back on skis in about 2 or 3 weeks. Both my PT and doc said that the ligament is tight and strong enough for me to get back to skiing. The only question mark is whether my muscles have recovered enough to take any sudden movements or pressure.
  • Strength: My operated leg is probably about 80-85% of my good leg in terms of strength.
  • Flexibility/mobility: There's no difference between the two.
  • Pain: The biggest difference is in the patella pain in the operated knee on squatting.
I can do one-legged hops on the operated knee without any problems (although not as high as on my good leg). Jumping of different kinds are okay (forward-backward, side-to-side, 180-degrees -- although I can tell that I'm slightly favoring the good leg on landing). Because of the squatting pain, I can't do very deep squat jumps.

Personally, I feel reasonably confident that my knee will be okay if ski groomers tomorrow. And if I build up strength for 2-3 more weeks, then it'll be even better. But it will probably not be back to 100%.

So my question for those of you who have done it: did your knee/leg feel 100% when you returned to skiing? Or were there certain aspects that were still less than 100%?
Hi faisasy,

You sound like you are doing great!

That pain you are feeling will someday go away. And then it will come back, and maybe won't bother you for a couple of months, then, bam, there it is again.

Listen, when you are in the gym, or working out, and you feel pain in your knee, remember that it is minor pain, and it is just something that comes along with switching out your ACL for a tendon, but it doesn't mean that you should stop working out, or not ski. Its just pain, and you need to develop a threshold for it. In other words, get used to it.

My knee still, after 2 1/2 years, gives me little pathetic twinges. And the first season back on skis was kinda scary, like I was afraid to do anything to injure it again, but after the first run, I was like, WTF was I so scared of??? And then it felt stiff that evening, so I went skiing again the next day. Well, why not? What have we got, like 40 years left? No time to waste, faisasy. Get on yer skis. Click in, brother. Hell, don't worry about it. The worst you could have would be a good time, even if you just ski groomers. And I'd bet you'd still have a good time, even if it hurt a little.

Have a great season! Because you can. 'S'all up here, bro. (sorry, there's no cute little smilie for tapping your head. You get the picture.)
post #209 of 245
Thread Starter 
^^^ Thanks for the reply, sheskis.

I'ev actually had somewhat of a breakthrough. I'd been having pretty bad patellar pain, which prevented me from doing deep squats or anything, and was making me pretty frustrated, since the leg felt weaker.

The other day, I was doing one-legged hops on the operated leg, and I landed a bit awkwardly, with the leg almost fully extended/maybe a little hyperextended. I stuck the landing, but felt a bit of jarring in the knee cap. I was a bit nervous, but surprisingly, my patella pain seems to have improved greatly. I can do pretty deep squats (80% of the good leg). Lots more deep jumps and everything. Maybe the jarring just put it in place.

The difference in the knee since that jarring is amazing. It feels very strong and stable. I can tell no difference between the two knees when running. Mind you, the patella pain isn't gone 100%, but it is so much better.

Finally I'm starting to feel like I could ski normally. I'm getting my brace next week, and plan on getting out there soon after (probably after the holiday crowds leave). I'm sure I'll be nervous as hell before that first run, but hopefully it'll turn out okay. I'm definitely planning on taking it easy this season.

Hope the rest of you are coming along nicely in your rehab as well.
post #210 of 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy View Post
^^^ Thanks for the reply, sheskis.

I'ev actually had somewhat of a breakthrough. I'd been having pretty bad patellar pain, which prevented me from doing deep squats or anything, and was making me pretty frustrated, since the leg felt weaker.

The other day, I was doing one-legged hops on the operated leg, and I landed a bit awkwardly, with the leg almost fully extended/maybe a little hyperextended. I stuck the landing, but felt a bit of jarring in the knee cap. I was a bit nervous, but surprisingly, my patella pain seems to have improved greatly. I can do pretty deep squats (80% of the good leg). Lots more deep jumps and everything. Maybe the jarring just put it in place.

The difference in the knee since that jarring is amazing. It feels very strong and stable. I can tell no difference between the two knees when running. Mind you, the patella pain isn't gone 100%, but it is so much better.

Finally I'm starting to feel like I could ski normally. I'm getting my brace next week, and plan on getting out there soon after (probably after the holiday crowds leave). I'm sure I'll be nervous as hell before that first run, but hopefully it'll turn out okay. I'm definitely planning on taking it easy this season.

Hope the rest of you are coming along nicely in your rehab as well.
You probably had a little scar tissue that was tethering in some way and you busted it up! Good job!
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