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What/how do you ski

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Just wondering
post #2 of 27
Interesting that the last question is running 50-50.
post #3 of 27
Please note - you asked what I liked not HOW I ski it...

Some things I like - because they are a challenge & teach me a lot - CAN'T ski them though!
post #4 of 27
Earth to people that said they like "ice". Obviously you don't know the meaning of ice. Unless you like to skid around with minimal control, or love to be punished, you cannot be serious. :
post #5 of 27
Yea, maybe you guys from the West think what you have is Ice. Ice is blue, and shiny. It is almost impossible to turn on it, unless you have ice skates. Think ice skating rink.
post #6 of 27
It's good to see that most of you like groomers. I can sleep peacefully at night now knowing that I shouldn't be treated as a witch for driving them.

The golden rule of powder....

Don't put a cat over it till after you have skied it!!!

In Japan I have to re groom half my runs if they get over two inches of snow on then once I have groomed them that night. But I'm allowed to leave a few for my pleasure.
post #7 of 27
I'm one of the idiots ...

Like I said - can't ski it

But it teaches me a LOT about balance etc...
We have some nice green/blue stuff
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by TomB:
Earth to people that said they like "ice". Obviously you don't know the meaning of ice. Unless you like to skid around with minimal control, or love to be punished, you cannot be serious. :
Racing in MN I would say I understand what the term "ice" is and yes, I do enjoy the challenge.
post #9 of 27
I also said yes to Ice!!!! Whenever it turns to rock hard boiler plate and / or ice here in snowy New Hampshire I take my coaches out for short turn training runs!!!! Some of them definately think I'm crazy-sometimes I am. I love it!!!!!!!!!

Last March it rained at about 3:00 am and then froze solid by 6:00. The mountain had a delayed opening due to the dangerous rock hard ice conditions. When they finally opened the blacks at around 9:00 am I took a group of my level IIIs & IIs up on it for practice. None of us were sure we could ski it or not, but they all were amazed that it turned out to be a great but harrowing clinic for some.

My view of upper level training is simple. If you don't push yourself to ski past your YIKES ZONE then you won't learn and grow. Just my personal feelings. Thanks Again,

: Whtmt :
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by whtmt:
I also said yes to Ice!!!! Whenever it turns to rock hard boiler plate and / or ice here in snowy New Hampshire I take my coaches out for short turn training runs!!!! Some of them definately think I'm crazy-sometimes I am. I love it!!!!!!!!!
...
My view of upper level training is simple. If you don't push yourself to ski past your YIKES ZONE then you won't learn and grow. Just my personal feelings. Thanks Again,

: Whtmt :
So one time we were at Wildcat in the rain. Someone remarked, "Oh that must have softened it up," but of course the top third of the hill was blue ice. Ice I define as the stuff you put in your scotch. We clattered down this to the softened snow many times. I take is as part of the varying conditions one can ski, but I do not love it enough to pay $50.00 to ski it. With that kind of ice, you're not going down Ovation or Devil's Fiddle, or maybe you are, and loving every minute of the slide. Ain't gonna do much growing on that stuff. Tell me there's a 50 degree chute of solid ice that you do short turns down. That'd go past your YIKES ZONE.
post #11 of 27
Why can't I like both long and short turns (as inded I do)?

About ICE, the trick is, in fact, to learn NOT to slide, and it
is only attainable with considerable technique and "finesse", and
work, work, work.
Anyway, we've all to make do with what Mothr Nature (or man's snow guns) give us.
post #12 of 27
yeah - I wanted both too
post #13 of 27
must be vanilla ice.
post #14 of 27
I couldn't answer the last question, even though it disqualified me from reading the results. I'd have to say my "usual" is shmedium but I like to mix it up.

I hardly ever ski man-made snow or ice except in the early season, and I'm so grateful to be back on skis I always find it enjoyable. The only snow I dislike is old snow. The cystals have been through so many changes they are whupped and the color is dirt-speckled red tide.
post #15 of 27
Are there really four people who said that they hate powder?
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by TomB:
Earth to people that said they like "ice". Obviously you don't know the meaning of ice. Unless you like to skid around with minimal control, or love to be punished, you cannot be serious. :
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by TomB:
Earth to people that said they like "ice". Obviously you don't know the meaning of ice. Unless you like to skid around with minimal control, or love to be punished, you cannot be serious. :
Don't think the meaning of ice has to be that it's so hard that it's unskiable. They water race courses. Remember seeing a Women's World Cup race (SL or GS at Nagano Olympics?) where a storm came in the day before and all the loose snow had been pushed off the course. The women were skiing on a blue ribbon of ice all the way down. Not something I could ski.

What I would call ice is very hard snow where the only part of your ski which is making you turn are your edges. It's when the snow is hard enough that when your skis are tipped only the steel of the edges is in contact with the surface. Of course as you switch from turn to turn your bases come in contact with the ice.

You can make tighter carved turns on ice then in softer snow. The sidecut of the ski has the most effect when the snow is hard. This is why I enjoy skiing ice.

Of course, most of us would prefer powder.
post #18 of 27
Why are slush and corn listed as the same? There is a huge range of conditions covered by corn and slush. Anyone who has skied the CA backcountry knows how good corn can be (better than pow?). How come windbuff did not get a mention? An epic Sierra windbuff day is something you never forget. I cherish buff and corn more than deep pow (don't ge me wrong, I love that too). Of course the geographically deprived may not ever get to ski either.
post #19 of 27
I live and ski in Vermont. I do not cherish the lecture on how ice can be. Try skiing ICE [not icey - ICE!], not on a race course, but on a narrow, winding Vermont trail - and if you like that, you're either almighty god or just f#%ckin' crazy. Try it on a crowded blue cruiser. Ice SUCKS. They close trails here for that.

Notwithstanding, I have heard from some youngbloods that they like ice because they can "go fast". These are the folks who like to drag up Main Street at 100 miles per hour. You read their names from time to time in the obituaries. Yee-Haw.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by Charlie Crabb:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by whtmt:
I also said yes to Ice!!!! Whenever it turns to rock hard boiler plate and / or ice here in snowy New Hampshire I take my coaches out for short turn training runs!!!! Some of them definately think I'm crazy-sometimes I am. I love it!!!!!!!!!
...
My view of upper level training is simple. If you don't push yourself to ski past your YIKES ZONE then you won't learn and grow. Just my personal feelings. Thanks Again,

: Whtmt :
So one time we were at Wildcat in the rain. Someone remarked, "Oh that must have softened it up," but of course the top third of the hill was blue ice. Ice I define as the stuff you put in your scotch. We clattered down this to the softened snow many times. I take is as part of the varying conditions one can ski, but I do not love it enough to pay $50.00 to ski it. With that kind of ice, you're not going down Ovation or Devil's Fiddle, or maybe you are, and loving every minute of the slide. Ain't gonna do much growing on that stuff. Tell me there's a 50 degree chute of solid ice that you do short turns down. That'd go past your YIKES ZONE.</font>[/quote]Charlie: I only shared a real ski event with you. First, none of the coaches in the ski group pay for tickets. Second I said that we push our Yikes Zone every chance we get, and on that day we all did learn something about skiing short to medium radius turns in extremely difficult conditions.

True, as you stated this was not a 50%+ slope. That would be suicide and I would never place any of my coaches in a predictably unsafe environment, where the likelyhood of personal injury would be imminent!!! And did most of us skid some of our turns, you bet we did. The goal, however was to attempt to adjust our ski mechanics so that we were able to adapt to the conditions at hand and make as close to a purely carved turn as posibble. On ice that takes a great deal of finesse in blending accurate movements. This ice was so hard, that our carbide tipped poles could only chip it!!!

However, the fun was the inevitable challenge to ski it. Attempt to make relatively round turns and skid as little as possible. All of the members of the group were very successful and were personally surprised on how well they skied it. Remember, these folks were all level II+ and level III+ certified coaches.

Would we want to ski those conditions every day??? Not on your life. Is it a challenge??? Absolutely 150%%% of the time! Will we all do it again??? Absolutely, this is New Hampshire. Did we enjoy it-you bet it was a rush, just by meeting the challenge. Were we all on the edge of or beyond our Yikes Zone --You bet. But guess what, not one fall occurred in the group and we skied multiple runs on this Black Diamond trail.

Thanks for your imput and take on our story. If you ever get to New Hampshire you're welcome to ski with the coaches at the White Mountain Adaptive Snowsports School at Loon Mountain NH. Informally, we're called the "LOONIES".

: Whtmt :
post #21 of 27
You can tell the people that live in New England. Ice here is truly ICE and we hate it. Out west ice is what we refer to as hard pack. New England Ice is Boiler Plate, almost tansluscent and kind of Blueish.

I love hard pack! I hate ICE!!! You do not know ice until you have hit a narrow New England trail with Ice on it like Oboe said.
post #22 of 27
OK, the last time I skied New England ice for a full day - I didn't fall once. I also hated it. It didn't FEEL good. Can I eat food that tastes like sawgrass and feels like cardboard? Well, yes I can. But why would I WANT to?! Testing ourselves and gaining proficiency is fine, but to me it's like taking cod liver oil - it might be good for me, but it's not very pleasant.

[ October 09, 2002, 05:43 AM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #23 of 27
I live in the East and ice is better than the breakable crust or frozen crud you can find out West. All skiing is good, but sometimes it's better than other times. The worst day of skiing is better than the best day at the office.
post #24 of 27
During my season in Vermont, I never found ice worse than at Thredbo in Australia! Ever. And at Keystone in Colorado, they had some icey stuff that'd compare with what we get at home (when unlucky). So I guess it happens everywhere. I remember The Canyons in Utah having some decent ice, and Lake Louise, ick! Ice city.
Frozen crud is the worst, definitley. Your kneecaps go plink plink plink down the hill, and your fillings all rattle loose.

I hate ice. And I rank good corn with powder, so there.
post #25 of 27
The "worst day of skiing" is better than the best day of breakable crust and frozen crud.
post #26 of 27
Not much ICE around these parts,just lots and lots of POWDER. Some occasional chicken heads. I've skied loud powder(ice)years ago where you could see the stumps and frozen fish under the blue-green loud powder(ice). It was good for ski tech. experience but I can honestly say it wasn't enjoyable. A high-end carving ski does help the fun factor. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #27 of 27
So some of you seem to think that WHTMT sounds a little insane and he is but that is why we love him! I am one of the group that always follows him out the door on the icy days and I cherish every turn that I take on those days! Sure it is a blast to ski in fresh snow or corn but how often do we get either of those conditions here in the east? So when the snow turns blue and you can see your reflection in it we head out the door and work on skills. If you can get your edges to grip and hold on that stuff then you are using them the way they were made to be used! Sure you may loose a filling or two but it's all in the name of skiing! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
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