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The flattest mountain? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Try the Toll road at Stowe for a real flat long run. Not that it wasn't scenic, just endless. Then you get dumped at the very bottom and have to take a 1 mile beyond slow chair to get back up. But it's a great place for beginners and totaly out of the way from anything else. Now if I could only find the Bruce trail next time.
post #32 of 51
Okemo is flatter than stratton IMO.
post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Okemo is flatter than stratton IMO.
Judging from this http://3dskimaps.com/index.php?path=okemo I believe you
post #34 of 51
At least Okemo has some good tree pockets like Forest Bump, Supernova and Outrage.
post #35 of 51
Real vs. marketing Brentton Woods: JHRefugee That's a really good one!

Okemo vs. Stratton: my recollection is they're equally flat. Though since Okemo doesn't flash that "money hill" image so it doesn't get bashed as much by the "real" skiers.

(Okemo was the "mountain" that I first "conquerred all the blacks" years back. Most of those "blacks" would have be rated blue in say, Whiteface, or even Killington)
post #36 of 51

Steepness

I know I am getting off the main subject, but the steepness is all relative. It really depends on individual, not to mention the given conditions.

I may feel totally giggly ripping down 40-degree pitched wide open bowls but I will cramp up and carefully pick my way down a 30-degree pitch littered with cliffs and rocks. A 30-degree pitch that drops 2000-ft will look steeper from the top than 45-degree slope that only drops about 500-ft. I can’t remember who said it but the following is the best description of steepness imo:

“As you look down from the top of hill that you are about to drop in, there is a big-lump in your throat, you can hear thumpity-thump of your heart, and there is that tingling sensation in your balls that runs all the way to tightening anus - baby, it’s steep!”

Let’s not knock on Bachelor too much. It’s a great mountain. I have tons of fun at Bachelor. It may not have the steeps like Squaw or W/B, but I find natural rolls, nooks, and crannies off Northwest Territories that drops over 2000 feet that I find a far more interesting than let’s say 40-degree wide open bowls. …I have to agree Timberline is damn flat. I haven’t skied there in years. However, you can get some serious speed going on palmer ice field in early morning during late spring/summer. Ski the palmer from 7 to 10 am and go down to Hoodriver and do some wind-surfing or go to the coast and waste the day away!

I love Oregon and PNW in general!
post #37 of 51
I thought the tread is about comparisons of ski areas, not one single run or sections of a slope.
post #38 of 51
I wanted to ask a related question...

Which would you prefer out of a run.
1. 1800 vertical feet with 1 major section of 40+ degree steep, but then long drawn out Green/Blue rest of the run ie: 20 degree creating degree average cost to the 20 degree value.

OR

2. 1800 vertical with much more consistant average of say 28-30 degrees

I enjoy both, but if I got stuck with one or the other, then I would choose #2.

-Guy
post #39 of 51
Agree with all suggestions thus far and would add Pico, Tremblant, Nakiska, Marmot Basin, Park City, Mt.Orford, Big White and Vail as all being more flat than steep.
post #40 of 51
Snowshoe WV has an interesting layout -- it's basically a large basin (with a lake) up on top of a mountain (4848' summit).



Sort of a horseshoe up there at elevation. They have a very flat layout within the basin; some of the trails are steep at the top, but all become green-ish runouts near the bottom. By comparison, the Western Territory trails on the backside of the basin (the actual mountain) have about double the vertical drop and are quite a bit steeper. There is a really drastic change in terrain (and weather) when you cross over at the top -- basically going from a protected snow-catching basin area to an exposed wind-blown mountain face.
post #41 of 51
Ok Timerline Mt.Hood,Or. is lame but god bless her.......It's skiing in the summer.
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talisman View Post
I think Keystone skis like Jackson Hole or Snowbird after a few days at Breckenridge.
You sure on this ? These are today at Breckenridge.
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525x525px-LL-vbattach1619.jpg
post #43 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gschlact View Post
I wanted to ask a related question...

Which would you prefer out of a run.
1. 1800 vertical feet with 1 major section of 40+ degree steep, but then long drawn out Green/Blue rest of the run ie: 20 degree creating degree average cost to the 20 degree value.

OR

2. 1800 vertical with much more consistant average of say 28-30 degrees

I enjoy both, but if I got stuck with one or the other, then I would choose #2.

-Guy

I`d go definitely with #2! And if this is wide open powdery bowl...mmm..absolutely scrumptious!
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
You sure on this ? These are today at Breckenridge.
Umm...that's not very steep. Those poles stuck in the snow in the background can't be more than 60 degrees off the slope angle (30 degrees steepness) - a very easy black.

Use this for reference:

Now that's steep. (yes those lines in the back are skied)

Powdr
post #45 of 51
Thread Starter 
Agree with Powdr, those lines look just "not-steep"...
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
I think there are three double-diamonds at Stratton. The only reason they call them double-diamonds is because the let them get bumped. I skied BearDown, a double-black this season when it was groomed. It is less steep and, groomed, skis easier than most blue squares at Stowe.
I can't figure out why Lower Slalom Glade at Stratton is listed as Double Diamond. I think the only fairly steep trail I skied there is World Cup - not very long though. If you like to cruise though it's a nice place.
post #47 of 51
Those Breckenridge pics are sickter gnar! I wet myself just looking at them!:
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
But it is very unsteep.
Agree.....

I vote for Mt. Flatchelor!
post #49 of 51
If you take away the North Face, Mount Snow is absolutely flat. If it's not crowded and you can tuck most of the trails, you can achieve 23 mph (see the thread in the General Forum on "How Fast Do You Ski?")
post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Those Breckenridge pics are sickter gnar! I wet myself just looking at them!:
The steep parts were closed.....we got as close as we could.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
If you take away the North Face, Mount Snow is absolutely flat. If it's not crowded and you can tuck most of the trails, you can achieve 23 mph (see the thread in the General Forum on "How Fast Do You Ski?")
.....and if you do this on Snowdo(w?)n you can catch some really serious air on the rollers (water bars that is!)
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