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my dog loved the photos

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
he is tired of the no dog policy of lcc. how about a dog thread?
post #2 of 28
As a moderator I'm kind of skeptical that dogs are related to riding, but it's the off season here on the East coast, so I'll bite. I did move this post out of a gear thread, because the dogs had already eaten the photos in the original thread. So the comment over there was kind of pointless over there.

So, without further ado, do you snowboard with your dog or maybe even with a pet of a different sort?

With respect to "no dogs in llc" (little cottonwood canyon), dogs are allowed in the canyon, but they must have a permit and permits are EXTREMELY hard to get. The reasoning is the same as why there is a big fine for peeing in the woods: SLC drinking water comes from the canyon. Excess pee goes straight into the drinking water. Many people have no understanding of how little filtering capacity there is in the mountains relative to the masses of human visitors that hit ski resorts. Individually, one person or one dog's piss will be neglible. Multiplied by 10000, it's a big problem.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
The reasoning is the same as why there is a big fine for peeing in the woods: SLC drinking water comes from the canyon. Excess pee goes straight into the drinking water.
I had no idea about this... what's the fine?
post #4 of 28
Last I heard it was $250 for a human. But I have never known anyone who got busted for it. I think the fines for a dog without a permit are much higher. According to my brother, people do get busted for that.
post #5 of 28
Is there wildlife in these canyons? How do you fine a squirrel, coyote, deer, bear, etc. for peeing?
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Matola View Post
Is there wildlife in these canyons? How do you fine a squirrel, coyote, deer, bear, etc. for peeing?
What, you've never tried moose pee? Tasty!
post #7 of 28
I snowboard with my dogs

and I pee in the woods.
sorry, no pics.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Matola View Post
Is there wildlife in these canyons? How do you fine a squirrel, coyote, deer, bear, etc. for peeing?
An excellent point and one that many canyon visitors mistakenly use as an excuse. There is wildlife in these canyons. There is also enough filtering capacity in the ground to handle their pee. There is not enough filtering capacity to handle ALL of the "tame"life in addition to the wildlife. There has to be some disincentive to stop SOME of the "unnatural" pee. It's a small price to pay for cheap, clean drinking water.
post #9 of 28
Plenty of dogs in LCC. In peoples' handbags...
post #10 of 28
If it fits in a handbag......it ain't a dog.
post #11 of 28
I think all dog politics certainly are local. In an "urban wilderness" area like LCC, leaving watershed issues to one side, for skiing and riding there are also safe travel protocol issues that are hard enough for humans to get right, particularly with multiple parties, much less throwing dogs of multiple parties into the mix...but then I don't live there so don't have a dog in the fight so to speak.
post #12 of 28
If it fits in a handbag, it's an accessory.. not a dog.
post #13 of 28
This is not nearly as cool as splitter's pic of snowbaording with his dogs, but a few years ago we were skiing at the Big Air competition at Boyne Highlands, Michigan, and there was a snowboarder who had his dog with him all day.
The dog rode the lift with him, jumped off at the top, and ran along side of his owner all the way back down.
After a while the dog got tired, so he laid near the liftie for a while, then........back at it.
It was cool to watch!
post #14 of 28
dogs riding lifts are as cool as anything
post #15 of 28
I take Cody out with me in the bc all the time. Dogs absolutely love getting out and chasing you around...




^^^Now that is a happy dog!
post #16 of 28
And another one from last weekend.
post #17 of 28
This has to go in the thread for the best pics of the season. Beautiful!

Shadow, my Wonder Dog, is almost 14 now, so her legs aren't quite up to Cody's antics. She occasionally hangs in my truck when I hit Loveland, but that's as close to being a ski dog as she'll get now. Long live all our canine friends!
post #18 of 28
Great dog shots!

I once rode a small avalanche near there, down Argentine Peak. By friends all gawked but my Great Pyrenees followed me all the way.
post #19 of 28
Killa Picts,

I'm not sure but I think the dog is an expert. Great pictures!
post #20 of 28
Here's a couple of stupid questions:
1) The one time I ran down a dry ski slope, I noticed the incredible strain on my calf muscles. Are dogs at risk from over-exertion/over-use muscle injuries when following skiers/riders down the slopes?

2) Every dog that I've seen running down a slope has been obviously having fun. But why do they have to have a human to follow to get them to do it? I know part of this is from domestication. How often do dogs "have fun" when we're not around. I've heard reports from our park and pipe manager that he has seen deer running the jumps and vultures sliding the rails in the morning. I've also seen an ermine "surfing" in powder snow. But every dog that I've seen left to its own devices on snow, although they may run around on flat ground, they will only walk or trot on pitched slopes. Do they wait until we're not looking, or is it something else?
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Here's a couple of stupid questions:
1) The one time I ran down a dry ski slope, I noticed the incredible strain on my calf muscles. Are dogs at risk from over-exertion/over-use muscle injuries when following skiers/riders down the slopes?

2) Every dog that I've seen running down a slope has been obviously having fun. But why do they have to have a human to follow to get them to do it? I know part of this is from domestication. How often do dogs "have fun" when we're not around. I've heard reports from our park and pipe manager that he has seen deer running the jumps and vultures sliding the rails in the morning. I've also seen an ermine "surfing" in powder snow. But every dog that I've seen left to its own devices on snow, although they may run around on flat ground, they will only walk or trot on pitched slopes. Do they wait until we're not looking, or is it something else?
Regarding question numero uno, you definately have to wait until they are strong and ready. You can damage a pup if it's too early. They should have fully developed hips, usually at least a year old. But after they are a year, most dogs I've seen do just fine. Some snow conditions are better than others. A foot and a half powder seems to be best on thier joints. They are tired after laps after a foot and a half day, but the pow acts like a cushion and they don't seem quite as sore. But it doesn't seem to affect them too bad anyway.

(overly posted pic #1)

This ol' girl has been riding for 9 years, and still cranks. She's gotten used to a lot of the places we go, and tends to know the easier ways down for old dogs. I did an internship monitoring snowmobile trespass in the wilderness areas for a human powered advocacy group. We were up riding in a particular location so much that she ended up finding her own way down and we could pretty much meet back up at the car. She's a little slower now, but she still goes out on big dumps and big vert days. She just hangs a little further back, she and the girlfriend cruise down together.

(overly posted pic #2)

And question #2. This guy is only a year and a half, this was his first season. He is hilarious. He is really fast and seems to keep up on everything except the steepest deepest things we ride. When he's keeping up he jibs the whole way down. One ride we do has a lot of rollers and pillows and a few good tree trunk rail rides and he jumps off all of 'em, even if I don't. But he does wait for people because he likes hangin with the crew, and he just gets a real kick out of seeing us slide down the hill.
post #22 of 28
I think dogs just find it a kick that they have to try to keep up with you. Cody is gets super excited when I start to strap in for a drop. He can't wait to go for it.

Splitter is right, you want to take them out when they are around a year old. Could be a little less time or more, but for most snow dogs a year is spot on. The pooch having a double coat and big paws help. Cody has a thick enough coat but I don't think it would qualify as a double. His paws aren't huge either but he has long legs for his body type. With the firm base underneath that we now have, he just flies. The steeper it gets, the harder it is for me to stay ahead of him! He dollar signs me big time.

Of course you also have to be careful. Board and ski edges easily cut into dogs. Sometimes seriously. So a little patience with training your dog pays off huge in the end. Even so, plan on some injuries. Stuff poking out in the snow and such can also cause damage. Rest days are key for the pooch too.
post #23 of 28
Shadow made it to Loveland on Saturday--she didn't do any laps on the hill, but we did do a few around the parking lot. Not bad for a 'senior' dog pushing 14 years!
525x525px-LL-vbattach1650.jpg
post #24 of 28
Shadow kills it
post #25 of 28
wishing my mountain would allow dogs, but no such thing...the one thing I would be concered about is a crash between my dog and a skier.
post #26 of 28
I don't think any mountain allows people to bring their dogs. Well Copper used to allow this one guy to bring his husky on the lifts. They would do laps off the Sierra chair. It was fun as hell to watch. That is the one exception and I am sure he was buds with upper management to get that pass. Otherwise, it's strictly backcountry riding with your pooch, and the associated dangers.
post #27 of 28
It's kind of funny and illustrative at our mountain. I've heard management answer the question by saying that no dog's are allowed at Whitetail, but I've never seen it posted anywhere. I also routinely see people bring their dogs to the mountain. Most of the staff I know will go no farther than advising guests with pets who are loose on snow to be careful because they can get cut by ski/board edges very easily. But other than that, I've never seen a guest asked to remove their pet from the premises. I've also never seen a guest try to take a pet up a lift, but we used to have a patroller who brought his lab up to the top (it was not an avy dog - we're in south central PA).

The illustrative part is that there are a lot of rules at a resort that really aren't rules unless you are causing a problem.
post #28 of 28
I guess I should clarify that as I don't know of a mountain that allows you to bring your dog on the moutain. I've had Cody out around the base area of Copper, Mary Jane, Loveland, several other places no big deal. If it's crowded, he'll be on a leash.
I just thought most people were talking about doing this with their dog.

Hence my response...
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