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Twintips replacing Snowboards?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Among the young, Twintips are surging in popularity.

According to a report by Snowsports Industries America (SIA), sales through January 2007 showed twintips soaring with 198% growth this season. Twintips now comprise 16% of all alpine ski equipment sales ($45 million out of $281 million), up from 12% last year.

Over the same period, snowboard equipment sales declined 15%, from $176 million in '06 to $150 million in '07.

These partial-year results seem to indicate a shift among the young, park-n-pipe crowd toward two-plank use.

In a less scientific study, we skied Whistler this weekend, and noticed as many twintippers as boarders in the "Highest Level" and "Nintendo" terrain parks. They also seemed to launch higher on the jumps. Some scary shyte.

Are twintippers the new boarders?
post #2 of 18
Twin tips are hip.

But correlation doesnt mean causation.
post #3 of 18
Twin tippers became the 'new boarders' 5 years ago.

By the time Mom & Dad recognize a 'fad' they want their kid involved with it just isn't cool anymore. The kids on the cutting edge of trends will have already moved on. The progressive kids switched to twin tips a long time ago, the herd of followers have been catching up.

The real story behind those SIA numbers is the acceptance of twin tip skis as good all around skis by the huge mass of ADULT skiers who would never 'hit the park', they just want versatile all around skis that can do a little bit of everything...twin tips fit the bill. Twin tip offerings from major manufacturers are also increasing, not to mention MANY wider skis are twin tips...more choices, more sales. (sorta bad statistics).
post #4 of 18
Gotta agree that this has been the case for at least 3 years now. Based on anecdotal evidence I'd say that in terms of kids/young adults, its those who switched to boarding several years ago that are switching back, not so much lifelong boarders switching to skis (although I'm sure there's some of that too). And there's certainly an increase in the number of adults buying twin tips as all mountain skis as Whiteroom mentions.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Twin tippers became the 'new boarders' 5 years ago.

By the time Mom & Dad recognize a 'fad' they want their kid involved with it just isn't cool anymore. The kids on the cutting edge of trends will have already moved on. The progressive kids switched to twin tips a long time ago, the herd of followers have been catching up.
I really dont' think thats what this is about at all. I think its about this:

When snowboard first started becoming popular, they offered a huge technological advantage over the old school straight skis; they were more strable, and had far more float. With the advent of shaped skis, and then of tortionally stiff fat skis, skis offer a huge advantage over boards; they are faster, easier to spin on, more float if you're on the right sticks, but the biggest is, they're just far more stable.

Of course, theres the followers who are doing it becuase its trendy, but think why it becomes trendy, because more people start to see that at the present time, it offers an advantage.
post #6 of 18
I'm fairly drunk sunday nighe.

These rad guys, are rad.

I just go do stuff because it's fun/

I'm lucky

I live in Reno
(slight jab to the other bros who dis reno0

I can hit anything in tahoe when it's fun to ski,
and
other things when they are fun to climb.

and my dogs kill it
post #7 of 18
obviously, this guy drinks, skis, and climbs way too much.

and has no outside anything
where are you people
post #8 of 18
so, twin tips replacing snowboards,
only iff you love riding lifts

but, let the skiiers whine about something,
they love stuff to whine about
post #9 of 18
It's funny, I started switching back to skiing the end of last year. I figured GS skis for speed on the groomers would be good. Then I ended up in the mountains on a powder day without my board, so I rented some fat skis. The rest...is history.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Twin tippers became the 'new boarders' 5 years ago.

By the time Mom & Dad recognize a 'fad' they want their kid involved with it just isn't cool anymore. The kids on the cutting edge of trends will have already moved on. The progressive kids switched to twin tips a long time ago, the herd of followers have been catching up.

The real story behind those SIA numbers is the acceptance of twin tip skis as good all around skis by the huge mass of ADULT skiers who would never 'hit the park', they just want versatile all around skis that can do a little bit of everything...twin tips fit the bill. Twin tip offerings from major manufacturers are also increasing, not to mention MANY wider skis are twin tips...more choices, more sales. (sorta bad statistics).
Yup, that and there is a trend (not huge) of snowboarders who used to ski going back to skiing due to the versitility and width of TT's. THey can ski more like they could ride but have some of the benefits of two planks. Just read above post! I am one of those adults who bought TT's this season. I had skied with some boarders over Christmas in the pow and really appreciated how boards performed in the pow, i wanted something more floaty like those boards and the mojo90's have really proven to be so much more fun than my conventional skis (in that terrain)
post #11 of 18
Chronologically I'm not kid. Unless you're 60 maybe. But I hardly boarded at all this year -- and probably last year as well. Before t hat, boarding was probably 80% of my days on the snow for 5 years.

At my skill levels of skiing and riding, skiing is much more versatile in terms of the terrain I can tackle and the snow conditions I'm happy in. I figured I'd ride when there is some decent fresh pow -- except now that I just got a pair of Pub Enemy's, I'm not sure I'll be riding much at all. FWIW, I needed new skis, as I was on some relatively intermediate skis that I'd outgrown -- and after boarding it just seemed natural get go with twin tips. Easier to ski switch, i ove the width -- great skis for me. I'll still board...once in a while...at least til my kids can really rip, then I'll ahve to ski to keep up.

BTW, I just finished painting my PE's -- nice retro look -- blue with a 1" white stripe down the center. Pretty cool. Was going to stencil a K2 logo on the tips...but I'm tired of smelling spray paint wafting up from the garage, so i'm just going to clear coat them and call it done.
post #12 of 18
I think the increase (at least in the midwest) is due to the lemming-like trend for teens and preteens to follow the latest fad and to look "cool".

Did see an interesting sight at Brighton this year. Mom and Pop on boards, 2 kids on skis. (can't remember if they were twin tips or not)
post #13 of 18
Many boarders that move to SW Montana switch to either AT or tele. The long traverses and occasional hikes you need to find soft snow don't bode well for boarding.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
Of course, theres the followers who are doing it becuase its trendy, but think why it becomes trendy, because more people start to see that at the present time, it offers an advantage.
Re Snowboarding; The coolness factor. When your Uncle Fred and Dad start boarding the coolness factor is gone.

Then it boils down to what works better. My son rides and skis. He prefers skis for many reasons-control versatility, speed.

What I am noticing on a casual bases that the younger kids seem to be favoring skis. And more teenagers too.
post #15 of 18
Just more ways to play in the snow. I don't see many young skiers that don't have twin tip skis. It sucks to ski behind them because of the roost but they seems to be a really good alternative.
post #16 of 18
I dont think it is just the twin tip market it is all skis in general, except for the more carve/race specific skis most manufacturers all mountain (and/or fat/powder skis) have a raised tail, whether or not this qualifies as twin tip or not is up for debate, IMHO I think it helps the ski become more well rounded.
post #17 of 18
We're not the "next" boarders were the first twin tippers.
post #18 of 18
I just happened to see this thread again, and wanted to add a bit more.

Some people are under the impression that twin tips are just for tricks and skiing in the park. Not true.

Twin tips, or at least a bit of a raised tail can make it much easier to back up a few feet, if you're trying to get into a chute, or stuck in the trees, etc. A raised tail can also make the ski easier to schmear in powder or corn, and more forgiving if you get in the back seat.
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