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Review: 2007 Stockli Stormrider DP

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Ski
Make: Stockli
Model: Stormrider DP
Length: 184cm
Radius: 29.4m

Me
Height: 5' 7"
Weight: 160lbs
Ability: Racer/9
Conditions: Powder, Crud, Slush, Bumps, Groomers
Other Skis Liked: 186cm Nordica GSR, 165cm Nordica SLR, 170cm Head i.Supershape Magnum

I have had these skis out in a variety of conditions so far. I first skied them on groomers that were slightly tracked up, and later got on them in slushy conditions and skied them all day right after a rare powder dump here in the northeast. These skis are great. I can't say enough good things about them. If you like GS/SG race skis, and you are looking to take that same stability all over the mountain, then you should consider these skis. They flatten out even the roughest terrain, and will carve a turn through just about anything. GS turns in crud - no problem. Surprisingly these skis are really not that difficult in short radius turns. Due to their race ski deisgn they have excellent rebound and offer solid edgehold where ever you are.

If you do end up on these skis and you want to carve, be prepared to go pretty fast. They do not carve as tight as a GS ski, but I wouldn't put them in the SG category either... The turns they make when carving are big though - and they are not crowd friendly. The 94mm waist is pretty narrow, so they don't even really feel like a fat ski when you are on them on hard snow. In crud however, you can notice the advantages of the stiffness and long sidcut as they blast through anything in their path. There are definitely skis out there that are more demanding, but these skis seem to be the right combination for what I was looking for in a fat ski, which was something that I could ski agressively on anywhere on the mountain, and something that would hold up to high speeds on rough snow without giving up too much short turn performance.

I will say that bumps were work, but not unmanagable. The shovels are actually much softer than I had expected on these skis, so they turned out to be more versatile because of it. I can see why Stockli keeps making this ski unchanged from year to year - they definitely have hit a home run with it. I can see these skis remaining a classic for years to come.

After skiing these skis, I can safely assume that the Stockli SS Pro would be one of the most versatile all mountain weapons out there because of the slightly narrower waist and tighter turn radius (more GS'y than SG-like). I wanted an off-piste machine so I went with the DP Pro, but I imagine that what the SS Pro gives up off-piste it more than makes up on groomers and is much more managable in in crowds.

Later

GREG
post #2 of 19
I agree I have them in 193cm (I am 6'2", 195lbs, Instructor) and like skiing them fast. I was off piste with a guy on Head 103s the other week and we were defintiely laughing more than anyone else we came across.

The 19mm plate means I have the leverage to carve easily with very little effort. Short radius , pivot them flatter until one needs the edge - we should not be slaves to one technique after all.

They float so well that they are easy to ski in the trees and they will just stomp anything when one gets the space (and lack of crowds obviously - we do not want to scare people do we boys and girls?) allows. I particularly love skiing off things as they are just so stable.

The most fun ski I have and I just wish that we had had more significant powder days this season to enjoy them more. I will never sell these skis and if Stockli talk about discontinuing them I am buying at least 1-2 pairs and vacuum packing them in UV fitlering plastic so that I can get at leat 5-10 more years of DP Pro joy.

On the Scott Schmidts - a serious back country/ off piste hound (5'8"/ 140 lbs - serious expert) has recently sold his SS to buy another pair of DP Pros are they are a more capable ski.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
I am surprised to hear you mounted yours up with a plate. I mounted mine with a Salomon PowerAxe Race SL Plate and S914FIS bindings, and people thought I was nuts because I was plating them. After skiing them, I am not a bit sorry that I used the race plate.
Later
GREG
post #4 of 19
A couple of questions guys -

I see the advantages of a plate on these but are there any disadvantages of mounting plates on these skis?

Also considering the Scott Schmidt, I'm a bit confused as I like the versatile looking dimensions of the SS (122-89-112) and would get it in a 178 whereas the DP (125-94-111) I would get in a 184. A retailer I spoke to on the phone said that it was a stiffer ski that needed driving 110% of the time whereas the DP was softer and more forgiving. The stockli site also has the SS as a piste orientated freeride ski, the DP as pure powder freeride and the XL (which I currently ride) as a 50%piste 50%powder freeride ski.

Thinking of keeping the XLs as a day to day ski and getting the DPs as a powder ski, whereas the SS might be the one quiver ski - what do you reckon?

Cheers

BB
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
The SS Pro, with the extra sidecut will probably ski softer than the DP with it's nearly 30m+ radius. I think the SS is probably more user friendly and more versatile, but if you are looking for an off-piste ski, the DP is probably the way to go. If I lived out west I would consider the SS Pro as a good all-round ski. Id on't think you will find the DP more forgiving because of it's radius, but the tip seems soft compared to a ski that is at home on groomers 100% of time time. This feature however, really enhances it's soft snow performance.

BTW, some consider plates on powder skis to be a disadvantage because you lose feel for the ski... Most who know how a ski works will point you in the direction of more lift for a fat ski as the lift puts you over the edge much more easily, and allows you to feel balanced on the edge - even if that edge is 1cm or more away from your boot sole.

Later

GREG
post #6 of 19
I asked about the SS when I picked up my DP's. I was told that the SS is very stiff, very demanding, and not powder friendly while the DP is a sweet pow ski that rips everywhere. I never skied the SS, but I can certainly agree that the DP rips everywhere.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
The SS Pro, with the extra sidecut will probably ski softer than the DP with it's nearly 30m+ radius. I think the SS is probably more user friendly and more versatile, but if you are looking for an off-piste ski, the DP is probably the way to go. If I lived out west I would consider the SS Pro as a good all-round ski. Id on't think you will find the DP more forgiving because of it's radius, but the tip seems soft compared to a ski that is at home on groomers 100% of time time. This feature however, really enhances it's soft snow performance.

BTW, some consider plates on powder skis to be a disadvantage because you lose feel for the ski... Most who know how a ski works will point you in the direction of more lift for a fat ski as the lift puts you over the edge much more easily, and allows you to feel balanced on the edge - even if that edge is 1cm or more away from your boot sole.

Later

GREG
Sidecut isnt everything in freeride skis. stiffness is more important. take volkls(since I know them best) the Mantra is stiffer with more sidecut(like the SS), the gotamas softer with less sidecut(like the DP).

Mantra do medium Radius turns better than the gotamas, but the gotamas ski sort turns way better and yet due a longer sidecut a more stable at speed too.
being a lighter guy I dont get skis like the squads and LP, they are too stiff and one dimensional. Long story short if was getting Stockli I would get the DPs over the other freeride offering.

I raised up my gotamas, it make them way easier to turn everywhere IMO.

Rielly has the 178 SS I would PM him but he was saying that the ski locks in to much in crud ie it can make one turn really good.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Rielly has the 178 SS I would PM him but he was saying that the ski locks in to much in crud ie it can make one turn really good.
That is exactly the reason I went with a longer radius ski. I also have a pair of Machete FB's and they have a little over a 21m radius. I had heard that they were a great crud ski, but I found them very hooky. The DP's don't have those hooking qualities at all. They arent a true 'fat' ski, but they seem to get the job done.

Later

GREG
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well, I had my DP's out in the conditions that they were built for today, on a mountain that is the size they were made to ski on... I have to say that these skis absolutely rip. I skied them today in fresh powder, and tracked out powder all over Breck here in Colorado, and they do everything and anything you ask them to do in these conditions. The places that these skis really shine above anything I have ever skied is in crud/tracked out powder. They are just simply comfortable in rough terrain. The soft tips seems to absorb terrain quite well, so that the skis do not bog down in the snow. They also like to go fast... I had mentioned this before, but today I realized how fast these actually like to go... and can go. The stability and comfort at speed is very impressive - just as good as my GS skis - and the DP's even have the same powerful feel underfoot. Great skis.

Later

GREG
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Well, I had my DP's out in the conditions that they were built for today, on a mountain that is the size they were made to ski on... I have to say that these skis absolutely rip. I skied them today in fresh powder, and tracked out powder all over Breck here in Colorado, and they do everything and anything you ask them to do in these conditions. The places that these skis really shine above anything I have ever skied is in crud/tracked out powder. They are just simply comfortable in rough terrain. The soft tips seems to absorb terrain quite well, so that the skis do not bog down in the snow. They also like to go fast... I had mentioned this before, but today I realized how fast these actually like to go... and can go. The stability and comfort at speed is very impressive - just as good as my GS skis - and the DP's even have the same powerful feel underfoot. Great skis.

Later

GREG
you kick DD243 ass today?
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
you kick DD243 ass today?
Not sure... you can ask him.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
you kick DD243 ass today?
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Not sure... you can ask him.
Yeah, he did, but then again I didn't massively core shot my bros today either.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post
Yeah, he did, but then again I didn't massively core shot my bros today either.

I didn't massively core shot my Bro's either...
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
The SS Pro, with the extra sidecut will probably ski softer than the DP with it's nearly 30m+ radius. I think the SS is probably more user friendly and more versatile, but if you are looking for an off-piste ski, the DP is probably the way to go. If I lived out west I would consider the SS Pro as a good all-round ski. Id on't think you will find the DP more forgiving because of it's radius, but the tip seems soft compared to a ski that is at home on groomers 100% of time time. This feature however, really enhances it's soft snow performance.

Having skied both, I have to respectfully disagree. The DP is much easier to ski, especially in the trees and bumps, than the SS Pro. The SS Pro was much more demanding in the 178 length than the DP in the 184 length. I thought the DP was a much better suited all around ski than the SS Pro because it is nice in the pow, easy in the bumps and trees, and is nicely stable and carvable on the hardpack. SS Pro rips it up on the hard pack though - it is the most stable ski and fastest fat ski I have ever been on.
post #15 of 19
DP Pro vs SS Pro - SS stiffer longitudinally than DP, so less forgiving and less versatile. Both laterally very stiff so capable of everything and with legendary Stockli Edge hold. SS an excellent ski but I think the DP is a better all rounder and better in deep powder, trees, crud and at stupidly high speeds.

Plates - if you are not a park rat and needing underfoot flex over rails etc then any flat ski will perform better with the appropriate plate ie appropriate to the type of skier and type of ski.

Personally you couldn't sponsor me to ski on Salomon kit but lots of people get on okay/ well with their stuff. I have VIST Speedlock TT (freeride plate) which provides some flexibility, lift and some dampening and I have it in 19mm because I can handle that sort of leverage.

Until you have skied your favourite fat ski with a plate instead of flat mounted it is hard to really believe the difference it makes.

If your post was refering to last Tue at Breck then it was truely a DP Pro day - lovely lovely lovely is all I can say - uncrowded pow and no cold wind like the 'Fridge normally has.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
The shovels are actually much softer than I had expected on these skis, so they turned out to be more versatile because of it. I can see why Stockli keeps making this ski unchanged from year to year - they definitely have hit a home run with it. I can see these skis remaining a classic for years to come.

After skiing these skis, I can safely assume that the Stockli SS Pro would be one of the most versatile all mountain weapons out there because of the slightly narrower waist and tighter turn radius (more GS'y than SG-like). I wanted an off-piste machine so I went with the DP Pro, but I imagine that what the SS Pro gives up off-piste it more than makes up on groomers and is much more managable in in crowds.
It's not unchanged from year to year. Iirc they softened the tip quite a bit this year (or was it last?). I was going for DPs before this season, but then picked up some Sanouks for powder days and instead chose the SS (188s). I haven't really tried them in deep pow and doubt I will now, I'm a 100+mm convert over the winter. In bad conditions, and on hard, icy slopes they are everything I hoped for.

Like Bushwhacker said, sidecut says nothing without knowing the stiffness. The Sanouks radius is 44.8 meters...but I won't say they are hard to turn . 188 SS are 26.8, and the stiffness means big turns is their game. I can agree they're made for more specific type of skiing perhaps, but then that's the kind of skiing I like Slopes are wide, steep, and not too crowded where I ski :
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by torfinn View Post
It's not unchanged from year to year. Iirc they softened the tip quite a bit this year (or was it last?). I was going for DPs before this season, but then picked up some Sanouks for powder days and instead chose the SS (188s). I haven't really tried them in deep pow and doubt I will now, I'm a 100+mm convert over the winter. In bad conditions, and on hard, icy slopes they are everything I hoped for.
Yeah, it was only unchanged for a season. 05/06 and 06/07 are the same so the soft tips came about last season. Prior versions (186) were beasts from what I hear. New graphics for 07/08 and it's supposedly tweaked a bit.
post #18 of 19
I understand from my eminent friend in Chamonix that they are a little softer for next season. Having tried the 193 (of 2005? 2004?) this year for a day and loved them (I'm 5'6", 135lbs) I am dead keen to acquire some 184s next year. Awesome, fast and better in bumps than my SLRs...
post #19 of 19
Funny, that's Heluva's main ski too, the SLR.
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