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Boot Dilemnas

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Now that I am finished obsessing about what gear to try this year, it is time for me to start obsessing about next year's gear. Specifically: boots.

I currently ski in the Head RS100, which fit me very well and which I basically like alot. The only things that I don't like about them may be issues that can't be solved. But here goes: since I got frostbite on my feet 30 years ago, my feet are always cold. If the temperature is below 30 degrees F, my feet freeze. Electronic boot heaters changed my life and enable me to ski for more than 45 minutes at a time (I currently have Hotronics, and they work well) -- but I am getting progressively lazier as I get older, and I am looking for alternatives to carrying around a recharger and battery packs.

Issue number 2: the basic immutable fact that plastic gets more stiff when it is colder. I like the stiffness of my boots when the temperature is above 20 degrees, but they feel like immovable blocks when it is colder.

SO. Here's my question for the masses -- wattaya think? The Krypton seems intriguing (assuming that it fits my foot), because of the supposedly warmer IT liner and the 2 tongues that can be swapped out for different stiffness. Will the Krypton have a similar performance profile to my Heads? OR should I do one of the following:

1) Stop whining and ski.
2) Suck it up and keep my current set-up.
3) Suck it up, dump the boot heaters, lose the toes.
4) Only go skiing when the temperature is above 25 degrees.
5) Other (explain).

Have at it...
post #2 of 20
On the kryptons:
You need to try on the boots to be sure, but if the heads fit real well, the dallebellos probably wont. In my experience the heads fit much higer volume feet than the kryptons.

My ideas:

You should do
1. Stop Whining and ski
2. Buy Intuition liners for your current boots (much warmer)
3. Buy a boot glove (much warmer)
4. IF you still need them use the hotronics. (probably wont need them)

considering the sheer hell I have gone through multiple times inorder to get a good boot (~20-25 trips to the bootfitter) I would always recommend that you keep a boot if it works for you and if you "basically like [it] alot".
post #3 of 20
Do you (anyone) know where to purchase intuition liners online?
post #4 of 20
I know someone that was the same way- frostbitten feet a number of years back skiing, and always complaining about cold feet- even in warm temps and already had boot heaters and skied with them on all the time. First thing I asked him was about his socks. With the heaters on I also suspected he was sweating too much and his feet were getting his socks and then the ski boot liners wet. He moved to thinner socks and it was marginal improvement (I suspected he was cutting off circulation at the arch area and the socks were some lower volume and more room to help). Next step he took was the previous suggestion of Boot Gloves. He was skiing much longer and actually had times when he could turn off his heaters except for colder days or nights or just have the heaters on for short periods of time instead of constantly. Also a good shop boot fitter may have to be involved if there are pressure points that cut down or off your feet's circulation.
post #5 of 20
If the boots fit, you are a lucky man. Just keep going with the Hotronics. Maybe buy a couple of extra batteries. Get the boot gloves and set the hotronics on a lower setting.

Ski faster when it's colder so you'll have the momentum to bend the boots.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
I just love advice that helps make me less lustful over other people's gear! (and will probably save me money as well)

I figured out the sock issue years ago -- I ski in Smartwool light cushion, and I powder my feet with gold-bond powder in the morning. Yes, my feet do indeed sweat alot, and this protocol seems to help.

I tried the Boot Gloves, and they did not seem to work that well for me (yes, I put them on the boots while I was still in the lodge and the boots were warm).

My boot fitter is well aware of my frigid feet, and has worked hard and long to elimenate all the pressure points. My boots are totally snug, yet once I buckle them they never feel so tight that I need to loosen them on the lift (sometimes I don't bother unbuckling them during lunch...).

I thought about replacement liners, but am unsure if the return on investment will be worth it. Opinions?
post #7 of 20
Hmmm...Boots are snug, no pressure points, no need to unbuckle. Time to start over. Get yourself a plug boot (nice and cold) three sizes too small (plenty for a bootfitter to do) and spend next season in frozen agony, hemmoraging cash. That will give you more to post about, join the club.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Now you're talking!
post #9 of 20
stay away from salomon falcons. They're fricking cold.

I also think your padded sock is still too much. you said you use a powder to keep your feet dry because they sweat alot, which convinces me that you haven't actually figured out the sock thing yet. Try 100% silk or a 100% merino light weight. (as thin as possible) natural fibers retain heat much nicer than synthetics that advertise dryness. (I know you said smartwool)

Now... seal your shell. I know you often don't unbuckle because they fit ok, but seal it anyway. Try duct taping the seams for starters. My race coach used to preach shell fit for warm feet... and I acknowledge he was right, it's all about the shell (and the sock).

dryness is always an issue, no matter how cold the day is, everybody's feet are wet at the end of the day. natural fibers (silk/wool) retain warmth better when wet. Synthetic, wicking fabrics are marketing hypes- where do they wick moisture to in a ski boot? It's not leaving your boot... so find a fabric that retains warmth when wet. (poly fibers suck in ski boots!)

sierratradingpost.com has been my ski sock outlet. Cheap wool ultralights and cheap silk.

and lay off the alcohol at night... your feet/whole body will sweat like mad the next day.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

and lay off the alcohol at night... your feet/whole body will sweat like mad the next day.


hahahahah!
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Seriously, thanks for the advice. My impression is that the Smartwool was 100% merino wool, although I could try a slightly thinner sock. I agree about synthetics -- I used to ski in thin Thorlos, and my feet are warmer in the Smartwools. The problem is that my feet sweat just sitting around -- I am sitting at my keyboard wearing light wool socks and no shoes, and I can feel my feet sweating. Oh yeah -- I tried antiperspirant on my feet previously -- it worked as well/no better than the powder, unless someone has a a particular brand/type to try.
post #12 of 20

Socks

You may want to try EuroSocks.

Either the 1034 Ski Super Lite or the Ski Elite Compression sock.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Hmmm...Boots are snug, no pressure points, no need to unbuckle. Time to start over. Get yourself a plug boot (nice and cold) three sizes too small (plenty for a bootfitter to do) and spend next season in frozen agony, hemmoraging cash. That will give you more to post about, join the club.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
I also think your padded sock is still too much. you said you use a powder to keep your feet dry because they sweat alot, which convinces me that you haven't actually figured out the sock thing yet. Try 100% silk or a 100% merino light weight. (as thin as possible) natural fibers retain heat much nicer than synthetics that advertise dryness.
This is Jer speaking I agree with samurai. Padded socks lead to nothing but trouble. Since I have boughten smartwools, my ski boots are as comfortable as my size 10 1/2 wingwalkers.
post #15 of 20
OK

Listen up!

Your feet sweat when they are warm, Less when they are cold,
The socks get wet when your'e feet are warm, the wet socks let your feet get cold

So it's easy.

Two pair of socks!

change to the dry pair AFTER your feet get cold (and dry up)

IF you take a break for lunch, take your boots off. Get some slippers to put on if you need to walk around the caf. Keep your feet dry, just like in the army!

Your feet are dumb. Help them. Use your head.

And my tone????? I'm just teasing.

Been there, done that, ask me how I know
My feet seat when I eat ;-)

CalG
post #16 of 20

Isolate with cork

One trick is to remove the inner sole in the shell and replace that with a cork insole, little tricky to get the fit right there but any how. This will increase the isolation of the boot and get a pair of extra batteries to the Hotronics, and long cables so thet you could carry them by the waist.
Then of course new liners could help as well, the Stroltz is pretty warm.
GL - anders
post #17 of 20
You might be a perfect candidate for the hot pepper idea.
I've read articles about people rubbing small amounts of hot pepper (ground up jalapeƱo or habanero) on their feet before skiing.
It supposedly stimulates something to help them stay warm.
It might help combat some of the nerve damage done by the frostbite.
Could be worth a try.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
tried the chili pepper; tried a "reflective layer" underneath my footboard; (Jer, I already ski in light cushion smartwools...); tried changing socks -- helped for about 30 minutes; (believe it or not) tried wearing slippers during lunch -- somehow I became a magnet for people in boots who would inadvertently stomp on my toes;

Still -- these suggestions are great. I guess I was hoping for a miracle...
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbinder View Post
I guess I was hoping for a miracle...
Prayer?
post #20 of 20
ID liner and boot glove. No miracle but it will feel like one.
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