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And I thought ski reviews were bad....

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Been out looking at new boards and reading reviews on various web pages... Would it be too much to ask for a little hard data? Most of the time you get the tip/waist/tail measurements, and the base composition. The rest is a crap shoot. Some sites seem to feel that the weight of the rider is an important factor, others don't. Some will tell you if the board is directional or not (an important item to me!). And the descriptions of the board's performance make SKI magazine's reviews look like Scientific America. I mean "butterable"?!? WTF does "butterable" mean?
post #2 of 16
i think it means you can spread butter with them.
post #3 of 16
I thought "buttering" on a snowboard was when you were riding on the extreme tips or tails of your board?
post #4 of 16
I think of buttering as when you are skidding the tip or the tail the way you would use the tip of a knife to apply butter to toast.

Good snowboard reviews are hard to find. The best I've found is on outdoor review. Per killcimbz suggestion, elsnowboardo has a lot to say.
post #5 of 16
The site Killclimbz suggested is great. If you search under beginner boards there you'll find good stuff.

Buttering is when you rotate off of a nosepress or tail manual. It's sort of like a longboard surfing maneuver. Tag, a board that butters easily will be pretty flexible. A board that butters easily and is also meant primarily for rails might be too torsionally flexible to ride well elsewhere once you start riding faster and trying to carve.

Personally I don't think someone who only rides a few days a year will really care that much whether your board is directional, or not. If you look at tip and tail width and whether the inserts have any setback you can generally tell whether it is, though. (I'm leaving flex pattern out, again for your purposes I wouldn't worry about directional flex so much as whether the board will work at slow to medium speeds and be forgiving enough for you to have fun.)
post #6 of 16
Just to add...

Weight is now the measuring stick by which board manufacturers recomend board size.

Elsnoboardo's review is a great in depth look. Keep in mind that this is his opinion and admittedly so. You will find lots of good recomendations for beginner boards on SB.com.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
I stand corrected. So, "butterable" does actually refer to a snowboard technique and isn't some reviewer being cute.

Quote:
Buttering is when you rotate off of a nosepress or tail manual
OK, I can guess a bit at what a nosepress is, but a tail manual? Assuming that this is the opposite of a nosepress?

Quote:
Personally I don't think someone who only rides a few days a year will really care that much whether your board is directional, or not
Interesting. The instructor for my lesson last time out indicated that one of the reasons I found riding so much easier today than my one day 15 years ago, was that the board was directional, whereas, most likely, the board I used 15 years ago was a twin tip and twin tips require more skill to ride and therefore are not a good choice for a newbie like me. I was under the impression from the little I've read so far and the couple of sales people I've spoken with that I should stay away from a twin tip design since I have absolutely no plans to ever get into the pipe/park area. Which again gets into my frustrations with the reviews because so many will talk about what a great all-mountain board it is and how you can ride it everywhere from the park to the pow, but never mention if it's a twin or a directional board.

Quote:
If you look at tip and tail width and whether the inserts have any setback you can generally tell whether it is, though
Yes, if the picture on the web page is a good one that shows it. Too many of them are not clear enough to tell, mostly due to the weird graphics on so many snowboards (sorry, just my .02 and my age showing )
post #8 of 16
Yeah, "butter" may sound different at first, but is actually more descriptive than, say, Royal Christie for skiing.

Regarding the minutiae of board specs and characteristics, honestly for you right now I'd just go with a shop's advice, either your local shop or one of the ones referenced in the other thread, after giving them your "vitals." Most will at this point have a few boards with forgiving flex, that will still hold an edge well enough for you, at end of season discounts. Those boards will also be versatile enough to keep you happy in different conditions you may want to ride. The rest -- there are directional twins as well as "true" twins, twin podwer shovels, etc. -- can just get confusing.
post #9 of 16
The last time I checked the Gideon Snowboard Bible in my Holiday Inn Express room, it said that a freeride board was directional and freestyle board was a twin tip.

What do the gear heads say?
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
The last time I checked the Gideon Snowboard Bible in my Holiday Inn Express room, it said that a freeride board was directional and freestyle board was a twin tip.

What do the gear heads say?
Not nearly that simple, but I don't think people need to get that wrapped up in it either. The blend of all the characteristics is more important. What our friend here wants, for instance, is imo that "mellow" board that still rides well.
post #11 of 16
A freestyle board is crazy twin tip, something you could ride normally or switch (backwards) off a landing, (i.e. pipe or kicker)
A freeride board is set back just enough to enable somebody to do easy tricks and rid not tha deepa powder. But pow none the less. If your a noob, you probably want directional. Since your really concentrating on turning facing one way, as opposed to listening to bad mall rat punk and throwing crappy 3's.

Iffn' your a noob and realize that you are aware of what other sno bro's think of you, don't get a directional and make sure you get some plaid/and/or camo pants. But if you really want to ride a snowboard on big fat mountains, realize the tricksters don't really know anything about big mountains, on average. And is your goal throwing tricks that you should be able to throw on a skateboard if you are worth a dam, or
do you want to realize snowboarding for all it's worth, and ride
big mountain lines that you couldn't ride on said skateboard?

I mean, it's cool to be bro, and wear ski/snowboard sweatshirts,

or..
it's
pretty freakin' rad to go throw down lines nobody else even gets too, let alone thinks about.

I'd say go directional, learn to carve, learn to ride pow, then get a splitty.

who else is drunk tonight?
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post
What our friend here wants, for instance, is imo that "mellow" board that still rides well.
Get a K2 Podium or Arbor Element,
The Element is prettier,
they're both spendy,
they'll both last ya awhile

the element is pretty

get good binders too.

You'll thank me in like 3 years,
I promise
post #13 of 16
I want to drink what Splitter's drinking, that's for sure! ...but as it's Mon am,maybe not til the workin day is thru.:

Element might be a bit stiff, ymmv.:
post #14 of 16
For me, it's all about the waist dimension, as well as the effective edge.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogachik View Post
For me, it's all about the waist dimension, as well as the effective edge.


With the "yoga" handle, I kinda see a drop-knee soul carve approach to riding, effective edge definitely has its place there.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anybody with some experience on the Ride Control model? Would you recommend it for a newbie like me?
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