or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Racing and Big Mountain Competitions › Please, help me get better! (sequence of pictures)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Please, help me get better! (sequence of pictures)

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Here's a sequence of pictures from our club race yesterday: http://mcgill.facebook.com/album.php...fb&id=13609907

Here's what I notice:
-hips aren't driving forward through the turn
-I'm dumping the hip early on some turns

I would really appreciate any advice possible!
post #2 of 15
Looks like a very nice turn. Only thing I would say is that I think you were skidding after the first turn. It might have been that there was nothing you could do about it, just a tight course, but I'm just throwing it out there. I really like the way you look out there. Nice carve on the first turn and I see no problems with hips. But maybe some better skiiers will see something.
post #3 of 15
I'd really like to see some video of this run - or a tighter sequence of shots, showing more of the progression through the turns.

But no matter. Here's some of what I see from the pix:

1. It looks like you may have a tendency to get blocked into an edging position, where there isn't a lot of dynamic motion moving your CM from turn to turn. This looks to be the case in pictures 9 and 10. As such, your position may not offer the right amount of flexibility to let your skis carve. Perhaps this is a reaction to getting low and fighting to get your line back - again, it's tough to say without a more cohesive set of shots.

2. You correctly diagnose the hips not going forward, which is more evident as the slope becomes steeper. Again, the "blocked in" position is often indicative of not moving your hips forward through the turn. It's as if you're simply riding the skis through the turn, rather than trying to move down the hill.

3. Your shoulders are sometimes a bit too square. I see this as you come into the gates: a late line, and you end up blocking the gate squarely with your upper arm and collarbone, rather than with the round of your shoulder. Look at pix of World Cup GS skiers, and they usually have their inside shoulder leading in such situations, rather than having the entire shoulder axis in line with the hips.

I think you have a lot of really good stuff in your skiing, mind you. Your stance is good an athletic, and you keep your shins parallel quite well throughout the turn process. You also seem to look forward nicely.

All I can say is that you need to get more aggressive working down the hill in the steeps. It looks like you've got the flatter portions more-or-less dialed in.

Good luck!
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies!


Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post
1. It looks like you may have a tendency to get blocked into an edging position, where there isn't a lot of dynamic motion moving your CM from turn to turn. This looks to be the case in pictures 9 and 10. As such, your position may not offer the right amount of flexibility to let your skis carve. Perhaps this is a reaction to getting low and fighting to get your line back - again, it's tough to say without a more cohesive set of shots.
songfta, could you please elaborate on your 1st point? You talk about dynamic motion moving your CM from turn to turn. What exactly do you mean?
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MLBfreek35 View Post
Looks like a very nice turn. Only thing I would say is that I think you were skidding after the first turn. It might have been that there was nothing you could do about it, just a tight course, but I'm just throwing it out there. I really like the way you look out there. Nice carve on the first turn and I see no problems with hips. But maybe some better skiiers will see something.
I noticed the skid. That gate was sort of a hairpin, the next gate having a whole bunch of offset. I think I was presetting my skis...
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
I noticed the skid. That gate was sort of a hairpin, the next gate having a whole bunch of offset. I think I was presetting my skis...
Yup, that definitely happens from time to time but there's no arguing that carving is faster than skidding
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
songfta, could you please elaborate on your 1st point? You talk about dynamic motion moving your CM from turn to turn. What exactly do you mean?
The point is that you want your CM to take the most efficient line toward the finish. Note that I say "most efficient," rather than "most direct." While in theory, most direct is the ideal way down, it's not always the most effective or efficient for the conditions.

So you want your CM to take that efficient line. In order for this to happen, it's important to reduce the amount of outside interference with this momentum as much as possible.

If you block your body into a position - set hip and shoulder position, angles, etc. - you create a really rigid platform that's susceptible to outside influences. The muscles and skeleton are more "locked" into position, so any ruts, dips, ridges, and the like will be more likely to throw you (and your CM) off-line.

Think of it like a car: if your car didn't have any suspension, you'd soar off of every bump and get rattled by any dip. The same analogy works in skiing, too: you need to be able to absorb the bumps, so you want to avoid being locked into a certain body position.

Not that you want to be too supple, as that presents other issues.

But human nature in ski courses is to try and stay on line as much as possible. If you get off-line, the panic sets in: muscles tighten, and you get locked into a position that may or may not be ideal for the situation. The goal is to gradually get back on line but allow you CM to find the most efficient line given the situation.

Furthermore, you expend more energy by blocking your body into a position. Yes, the buzzword is to "stack your skeleton," and that's a good ideal. But a lot of people use excessive muscle action to force this stack, to force a so-called "ideal" position. In doing so, a lot of energy is put into the turn - often more than is necessary.

And that leads to the key: be flexible, be adaptable. Every course presents different challenges; our goal as racers is to adapt and perform the best we can.

I hope this clears things up.
post #8 of 15
Just a couple of quick things that will help a lot... You have a very heavy inside tip lead, this causes your hips to rotate away from the gate which you are amplifying by your counter rotation to get your upper body by the gate. This will also very often cause what they call a diverging parallel, you can feel this as your weight will frequently transfer to your uphill ski on you. First step is going to be to get your feet further from the gate and get your tips matched. An easy way to do this is to think of pulling your inside ski back, you will feel it when you get them matched. Now just make a little room between your feet and the gates to create some angles and you wont have to turn your shoulders away from the gate in order to get past. Exagerate the distance for a little while in order to get the feel of how much room you need to make proper angles then adjust from there in order to tighten up your line.
Just my two cents from what I see.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
I just got some slalom shots from the day before. Here they are:

http://mcgill.facebook.com/album.php...39&id=13609907
post #10 of 15
I don't feel qualified to race MA, but I did facebook friend you
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
hahah sounds good...
post #12 of 15
Same here, CANADIAN RACERS UNITE!
post #13 of 15
This looks like pretty good skiing. I'd love to see some turns out of the course to try and see what some of your habbits are that are inherrent in your skiing that are not created by the presence of a course. My favorite shot out of the entire GS sequence was photo #8. http://mcgill.facebook.com/photo.php...609907&l=5fefb

Compared to the other shots #8 shows a very well balanced skier who is comfortable in the turn. The reason I point this out is because that turn is completely different from all of the others. Most notably, your stance is much narrower, and your balance is almost entirely on your outside ski - which in a turn like that is a powerful position to be in. It shows that you did not hesitate as you began the turn and that you committed to the outside ski from the beginning. In nearly all of your other shots your stance is much wider than hip width and your inside foot is hindering your ability to power around the turn like you are in #8. Also notice that both skis are off from under your body - versus just the outside ski being off from under you in the other turns.

Photo #3 is probably the closest match to #8 (same direction, similar angles, similar point in the turn). If you notice, your stance is much wider in that particular shot - likely causing your inside leg (whether you can feel it or not) to be bearing enough weight in the turn to hinder your balance on the outside ski. Luckily you didn't skid out a lot at the bottom of that turn, but you were forced to throw in a large pivot leading into the next turn. When executed from an overly wide stance, this can put you on the inside ski rather quickly. Had you been on the outside ski in the previous turn you may have been able to minimize the pivot. Incidentally, a pivot entry turn is also much easier to execute with a more functional/narrow stance. The compensation for not using a wide stance, is to focus on the vertical separation of your stance as the turn develops. This will help your power through the turn immensely.

You also seem to be much stronger in your turns going to the right - I don't know if others have noticed that or not... Also, just curious, is SL or GS your better event?

Later

GREG
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Greg,

Thanks for the comments! I will try to get some freeskiing shots this weekend. I actually know someone who has some but I just need to get a hold of them...

I had never thought about the wide stance causing me to end up on my inside ski. But I think my stance ends up wide because I'm not engaging the outside ski early enough. As a result, my outside ski washes out.

With respect to my left leg, I've had some ankle issues that I'm resolving, and I'm currently trying to figure out how to roll into my turns on that side. I think I need to really make sure I move forward into my turns, especially on that side.

Strangely enough, the turn shown in pictures 8 and 9 is a result of being late off the gate before. It's coming into the flats.

Slalom is my better event. Why do you ask?
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
Slalom is my better event. Why do you ask?
I thought so. I will see if I can get to the slalom tonight - if not I will do it tomorrow night.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Racing and Big Mountain Competitions › Please, help me get better! (sequence of pictures)