EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Can wax be blended to get intermediate temp?
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Can wax be blended to get intermediate temp?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have some < 25F green and some > 25F red. Would it be possible to make a mid-range wax, say 20F-30F, by blending the two?
post #2 of 18
Yes.
post #3 of 18
Agreed. Blending waxes works great. Some even will use one wax on the whole ski and a harder wax along the edge area of the base (as it gets worn off quicker there.)
post #4 of 18
I have been doing that all season. I've got some super-cold wax (from Stowe, of course), that milky green stuff, plus some "normal" red wax. So I mixed those two, with more or less of one depending on what the temperatures were doing. Or doing layers, depending on how the weather was headed.

Now i'm "cutting" my red with parrafin!

So far it's all working very well indeed, and it gives you a lot of flexibility with 2 lumps o wax. (and a large box of parrafin).
post #5 of 18
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...156#post360156

People have been doing this since ... well, I think since the 19th century.
post #6 of 18
I don't know how you plan to blend -- most folks just melt/drip both waxes on the ski and iron in to blend -- but you can also blend waxes by melting them in a tin can over a stove burner on low, stirring them to mix, then pouring the blend back into the wax container and let it cool into a brick.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
I don't know how you plan to blend -- most folks just melt/drip both waxes on the ski and iron in to blend -- but you can also blend waxes by melting them in a tin can over a stove burner on low, stirring them to mix, then pouring the blend back into the wax container and let it cool into a brick.
You warm the end of the wax on the iron and crayon it on in a checkerboard pattern of about 3" oblongs that are each 1/2 the skis width
Take your first wax and make squares that are "kitty corner" to each other leaving every other space blank.Then you come back with your 2nd wax and fill in the empty spaces and iron it all in. this blends the wax when ironed in!

Also, crayoning uses much less wax then dripping and less to scrape!
post #8 of 18
Atomicman's right. crayoning means you're not wasting oodles of wax and making a horrible mess with all the shavings.
post #9 of 18
Since I'm running low on wax at this point and my shipment is no where in sight I've started blending what I have left. Is there any utility in mixing CH7 or 8 with F4 universal to extend the temp range and help with spring conditions? Should I just go with the universal and be done with it? And I definitely have to start crayoning.
post #10 of 18
I don't crayon the wax. IMO it would take to long.

I've doing this long enough I've learned how to apply the correct amount so very very little drips over the edge. Just start out with what looks like not enough and add another drip or two if you need. It's not rocket science.

This past weekend I mixed Dominator Hyper Zoom with some Race Day yellow. WOW what fast glide.

I have tried mixing some Hertel Super Hot Sauce with Dominator HX07 cold powder and I'm not sure it worked as well as I expected on one of the colder day's when it was expected to warm up to the single digit's.

Has anybody else had the same thoughts when mixing brands?
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
I generally crayon on and then drip a little more. I find it only takes 1/2 a minute to crayon on first. The extra drips then make it easier to make sure I get coverage everywhere when I smear it around with the iron.

I always thought you didn't want to put an iron against a dry ski so it was important to crayon on first.
post #12 of 18
In my 7 or so years of waxing, I haven't had any troubles with the iron touching the base. May be I'm just to dumb to no better
post #13 of 18
I have tried crayoning on, but find it less convenient than drip and iron. But then again, I am pretty sparing/accurate with the wax even with the latter method, and don't get much excess. Generally, my iron has a film wax on it from the previous time to get the ball rolling.
post #14 of 18

All true, but...

...I wouldn't mix green, which is super hard, with red, which is super soft. Standard mixes are things like toko blue hydro and toko red lf, which I used yesterday. For starters, red is a mid range wax. If you want something that's a little less red than red, mix red with blue, not green. Any time you're using green, that's all you're gonna want on the ski...
post #15 of 18
My main point of crayoning with a checkerboard was an easy way to mix the waxes. using less wax was a side benefit.

it is not the dripping off the edge or the mess I am concerned with, but why waste expensive wax that you are going to scrape off and throw away? Less is better and it is better to have the wax on the base before your iron.

Also when hotscraping it is easier to get all the wax liquified at once when there is less on the ski.
post #16 of 18
An option for blending waxes are to place both flavors together and melt at the same time. Melting and making your own 'gradient' wax allows you the ability to use one or the other or both with a lean one way or the other depending on low end or high end of middle range.

It surprising how well the broad range of some universals work.

To minimize wax and protect bases, you can crayon on or use as little as possible and use a teflon sheet between iron and base......or just use liquids or sprays.
post #17 of 18
The green has been just fine, on coldish days, when mixed with the red. it is quite a large jump, but alone it would have been a bit ugly. It's hard to work with, too, as it's hard and brittle. It blends quite well, and the addition of it means the wax job lasts a bit longer.

and red isn't super soft! Yellow and parrafin are super soft. red is just softish.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
I have tried mixing some Hertel Super Hot Sauce with Dominator HX07 cold powder and I'm not sure it worked as well as I expected on one of the colder day's when it was expected to warm up to the single digit's.

Has anybody else had the same thoughts when mixing brands?
I've been mixing the Hot Sauce with the Maplus Universal Green for our colder man made snow with excellent results. Very good glide and durability in most conditions.
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