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Help! What exactly are the differences in "old school" vs. "new school"?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I see this referenced here from time to time in terms of skiing a ski eithe old or new school.

Hate to sound stupid, but just what ARE the differences and why does it matter?

Thanks,

PJS
post #2 of 15
In terms of equipment, new school means twin tips and mounting your bindings forward for riding switch.

New schoolers typically spend a lot of time in the terrain park. Even off-piste, you'll see a lot more tricks.

They tend to dress like snowboarders and have a similar attitude. Young, male, obnoxious. This isn't universally true, but true a lot more often than I'd like.

Compare Warren Miller to TGR movies.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestEast View Post
Compare Warren Miller to TGR movies.
Which would be old school and which new?
post #4 of 15
Not sure why this is in gear. I thought the terms referred skiing tricks.

Old School aka "Hot Dog" = Daffies, Backscratchers, Spread-eagles, etc. Ski tricks done done back in the 70s.

New School aka "Freestyle" = various grabs and spins and such, I'm an old fart and don't the names of the tricks the kids do in the park now-a-days.
post #5 of 15
Hmmm... I don't know the context but PJS may be referring to another distinction in ski style: i.e., new, wider-stance, shaped ski carving versus the feet-together old school style that was popular with long, straight skis. Just a thought...
post #6 of 15
It could be said that if you have to ask...you are old school.
post #7 of 15
I know, I know…:

Old style:
The GLEN PLAKE Mohawk

New style:
The DAN TREADWAY Snowmobile
post #8 of 15
I think of "new school" as being the terrain park rats who spend more time with their skis off the ground then they do with their skis actually on snow. You should also be on a first name basis with the local emergency room staff.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I think of "new school" as being the terrain park rats who spend more time with their skis off the ground then they do with their skis actually on snow. You should also be on a first name basis with the local emergency room staff.
Yep and all "bears" wear tight pants, only ski moguls, can't ski pow, race, and own metrons.

Who cares what someone is ? Their like everyone else that skis. You got your ass holes everywere, gapers and pros alike. New school skiing involves aerial and rail tricks but mostly is about style and enjoying the mountain. Sometimes I get the feeling that no one skis for fun anymore.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by X-EastCoaster View Post
Which would be old school and which new?
Warren Miller movies have some park and pipe sections, but are more old school than new. TGR is more new school.
post #11 of 15
Maybe it depends on which schools you're talking about. I thought Old School was the folks with their feet together and New School was with your feet more shoulder width apart. Stein Ericksen VS the typical young college racer or cliff jumper.
post #12 of 15
When I mention old school vs new school, I am not thinking about pipes, parks or movies. Rather it is taking advantage of the advances in ski equipment technology. New school technique is very subtle with the emphasis on edge changes and higher edge angles. The design of modern skis allows you to change edges without a significant unweight movement. Old school skiing depended on unweighting to release one edge to get to the other. With old school skis, it was very difficult to carve a turn from start to finish. Old school = feet closer together, new school = feet in more athletic stance. I see a lot of skiers on very modern equipment using very old technique...nothing wrong with that, but it certainly doesn't use the technology available and is definitely more tiring.

But what do I know, I've never taken a lesson in my life....
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
When I mention old school vs new school, I am not thinking about pipes, parks or movies. Rather it is taking advantage of the advances in ski equipment technology. New school technique is very subtle with the emphasis on edge changes and higher edge angles. The design of modern skis allows you to change edges without a significant unweight movement. Old school skiing depended on unweighting to release one edge to get to the other. With old school skis, it was very difficult to carve a turn from start to finish. Old school = feet closer together, new school = feet in more athletic stance. I see a lot of skiers on very modern equipment using very old technique...nothing wrong with that, but it certainly doesn't use the technology available and is definitely more tiring.

But what do I know, I've never taken a lesson in my life....
Good answer. But then...I suck @ Skiing.
post #14 of 15
Actually I think the opposites are "old school" vs "modern"
and "new school" vs ??? (who knows, I'm not part of that culture.)

The first opposition is straight skis, pivoting, skidding vs shaped skis, carving (and still some pivoting, but less, and done differently).

The second opposition is the kids in the park and pipe (snowboard inspired) vs those of us out on the rest of the mountain. They probably just call us "boring."
post #15 of 15
My answer is in post 43 of this old thread.
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ghlight=school
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