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DIY Sidewall

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Let's say I just want to clean up my edges with a diamond stones and a file guide. The sidewall is flush with the edge such the the stone will be running on the sidewall. I'd like to take off just enough sidewall to get a clean run on the edge with the stone.

Is there an easy do-it-yourself way to do this without a special tool?

Would it work to take sand-paper wrapped around something stiff (like a file) and then add a slight shim in the file guide (several strips of paper) to increase the angle a tad? If so, do I care what kind of sandpaper?
post #2 of 16
How about simply a coarse file instead of the sandpaper with the shimmed guide approach?
post #3 of 16
You don't even need the shims if the file is short and you can work in into the sidewall just above the edge. I do this for the spots that the sidewall planer doe not do so well - tips and tails. I also do it to do a quick touch up in places on the sidewall itself, rather than "hard starting" the planer in the middle of the ski.

A panzer file is best.
post #4 of 16
Another vote for a panzer file, it's what I use and a couple light passes does the trick. Not real expensive either.
post #5 of 16
The panzer is clearly a superior 'coarse file' with multiple capabilities. I just got done putting our 100mm/4" panzer through the paces for plexi scraper sharpening and side wall cutting. It worked great in both the Razor & Xact for scraper sharpening as it supports the scraper better while cutting a flat, straight edge, than the 44mm/1 3/4" panzer. It was fine for side wall cutting, but the 44mm followed the side shape a little better.

It was nice using the guide set at 6°, but it was easy and effective to rotate the panzer and guide over 6° while the guide ran along the edge for a uniform cut. Anything less in coarseness than a panzer can work, it'll just take longer and probably require more cleaning as the shaves won't stream off as nicely.
post #6 of 16
A couple of years ago I bought a TOKO adjustable angle edge tool. Seemed like a great idea until I tried to use it. The "magnets" that ares upposed to prevent filings from being dragged down the base actually do just that - drag the filings and the ange is never right nor does it stay the same .... I hate it for an edge tool and I am sure many of us have some tool like this ...

HOWEVER - put a course file in it and increase the angle to something like 86 degrees and it is a great sidewall removal tool. I use a piece I broke off of my Panzer file (my favourite file when frustrated).

I really like the shim on the file guide idea as well. Will pass that along to some racers that are always complaining about not having a sidewall removal tool (approx $80)

Mike
post #7 of 16
A sidewall remover is a worthwhile investment. If not, you can remove material with the flat end of your edge file.
post #8 of 16
Backfiling is the term used to cut the sidewall back when setting your side edge bevel.

I use a short panser file in a guide set 2-3 degrees over the final bevel I am trying to achieve.

So for a 3 degree side edge I make 2 maybe 3 passes with a 6 degree beveler with a panser file.

I then go to 1 degree over my final bevel and sharpen the edge at 4 degrees with the panser.

I then use an 18 tooth per cm fine file at 3 degrees until sharp. Then I use a progression of diamond stones, knock off the hanging burr with an arknasas stone and then final sharpen and polish with an arkansas stone. One more pass with the arkansas flat against the base edge to remove any remaining hanging burr and then a very!! very!! light!! pass with a TOKO finishing block at 45 degree angle to the edge to smooth any burr of any kind left on the edge.

Try this and you are in for some serious edge grip and a silky smooth ride!
post #9 of 16
Since were on the subject, why to manufacturers make the sidewalls at 90 degrees knowing that they will need to be backfiled sooner or later for tuning purposes or on racing skis? I've always wondered.

I understand the purpose of the sidewall lip sitting over the steel edges is to impart structural strength, but since its routine to backfile, creating a manufactured 5-7 degree sidewall angle shouldn't be a problem. On the otherhand, repeated tuning without backfiling will eventually produce about a 90 degree side edge angle regardless of the degree of side bevel sought because the file in bevel tool will eventually end up contacting the sidewall lip instead of just the steel edge.
post #10 of 16
I've been wonder this as well. I assumed it was a function the ski manufacturing process to assist with attaching the edge.

A couple visual aids FWIW:



post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post
Since were on the subject, why to manufacturers make the sidewalls at 90 degrees knowing that they will need to be backfiled sooner or later for tuning purposes or on racing skis? I've always wondered.
I imagine it's because skis come from the factory machine tuned. Though not negligible, the sidewall is less of an issue when dealing with tuning belt or ceramic disc machines. I don't think an automated sidewall shaping machine even exists.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I've been wonder this as well. I assumed it was a function the ski manufacturing process to assist with attaching the edge.

A couple visual aids FWIW:

Technically, it would stiffen the ski right over the edge, but this would have to be a small part of the ski's overall stiffness (which comes from the layers laminated to the core).
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Technically, it would stiffen the ski right over the edge, but this would have to be a small part of the ski's overall stiffness (which comes from the layers laminated to the core).
An angled sidewall lip over the edge would stiffen the ski as opposed to a straight lip? :

I don't think so?
post #14 of 16
Stiffening the ski? We're talking about a mm of soft plastic here. The difference is negligible.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
An angled sidewall lip over the edge would stiffen the ski as opposed to a straight lip? :

I don't think so?
No, I was saying the straight lip would technically have more stiffness (which I think is what you are getting at). It's a very small difference though, especially compared to the overall stiffness of the ski.

My honest opinion is that the vertical part of the sidewall lip over the edge could be there for two reasons: 1) Durability: if the sidewall angled all the way to the metal edge (take out the red part in the picture) the resulting "corner" would probably be a lot more susceptible to damage. 2) manufacturing, to have more substance to work with where the edges get laminated together, so that milling/grinding the finished product has some slop to work with.

The sidewall itself probably does not contribute a lot of stiffness to the overall ski structure, but seeing that it's a critical part in between the ski structure and the edge, it's got to carry/support some load when the ski is on edge, even if only to transmit forces from the core and sheets (via glue) to the metal edge. We don't normally think of a glue layer as structural, but it has to hold for the other parts to carry/transmit a load in a composite structure. I think the sidewall is sort of in the same category.
post #16 of 16
It is only the small ridge directly over the edge that protrudes from the vertical sidewall we are talking about. Angling this portion only at a 5-7 degree bevel towrds the vertical sidewall certainly would have no effect on durability nor have any effect whatsoever on stiffness.

Look at page 3!!!! We are talking about the area he refers to as 2nd edge!

http://www.holmenkol.us/myadmin/data...ge%20macro.pdf

I see no reason they could not incorporate this at the factory.
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