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Summerizing skis

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Looks like the ski season is just about wrapped up here in South Central PA, What should I do to my skis before I put them away for the year?
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb12string View Post
Looks like the ski season is just about wrapped up here in South Central PA, What should I do to my skis before I put them away for the year?
If you do your own tuning, wax skis as you normally do and leave the wax on till next ski season. Most importanly store your skis in a dry environment, not too hot . I leave mine in the house in a closet cause the garage gets really hot in the summer. You can do an inspection of the bindings and tune the edges now or wait till next season. I believe some folk put a bit of spray wax on the edges or a light oil to keep moisture off. I don't have too much humidity here so my edges stay pretty clean. OR you could alway not put the skis away and just travel the world following the snow. Seems like a good idea
post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb12string View Post
What should I do to my skis before I put them away for the year?
Ski on them?

Other than that, what mkevenson already said. Slop on some extra wax. Ideally, you want it to pretty well cover the edges.
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb12string View Post
Looks like the ski season is just about wrapped up here in South Central PA, What should I do to my skis before I put them away for the year?
1. Come to the PNW where there is still plenty of snow.

2. Wax but don't scrape and store them in a conspicuous place where you can see them and think of the season to come.

3) During idle time during the dog days of summer you can hot scrape, file and polish the edges for the coming season if you like to tune your skis yourself.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
Slop on some extra wax. Ideally, you want it to pretty well cover the edges.
I like to begin my storage wax coat by covering the sides of the bindings with some masking tape to keep them clean and use the "crayon" method on the side edge. I find I get much better coverage that way then trying to "slop" it over from the top. Then I follow up with a good sloppy coat on the base.
One thing I am wondering about is doing anything to preserve the camber during storage (I've heard a variety of theories on this) like not leaning them upright with the bases against the wall. I can't believe this de-cambers the ski's anywhere near as much as locking them together with the brakes and who isn't doing that?:
post #6 of 23

If you want to go the extra mile:

Quote:
I'm going to build a hermetically sealed box, located in a cool, dark place, and line the base with JC Penny white sale pillows of different thicknesses to match the ski camber. Connected to a PV cell and battery will be an iPod and small speakers to continually play soothing music. Once a month, I'll open the lid, rotate the skis, massage them with a soft nylon brush, then tickle them with a soft horsehair one, while talking about how special our next excursion together will be. Before sealing it up again, I'll replace the flower pedals with fresh ones of the season.
I just hang my boards in a rack by their tips with straps around the bottom third with a coat of wax as described. Tuning skis outside on a summer day keeps you from getting too rusty and keeps them ready for when the snow flies again. It also helps to avoid some of the frenzy in the fall if you tend to put it off tuning until the last minute.

(The season never really ends...........it just slows down a little.)
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4cznskier View Post
IOne thing I am wondering about is doing anything to preserve the camber during storage (I've heard a variety of theories on this) like not leaning them upright with the bases against the wall. I can't believe this de-cambers the ski's anywhere near as much as locking them together with the brakes and who isn't doing that?
Well ... I can't believe it decambers skis at all (assuming the wall isn't inside a very large oven, or the functional equivalent). If someone is actually worried, you could insert a block between the skis ... you could also store your boots in a press, along with your tennis racket (not the same kind of press, though).

A previous thread:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=18770
post #8 of 23
Don't forget to line the box with tin foil to keep out harmful radiation. Also, aliens can't see your quiver through the tin foil.
post #9 of 23
.....neither can Homeland Security.
post #10 of 23
Binding covers against the woodworking dust.
post #11 of 23
Whatever you do, do not store them in the basement or in the garage. 2nd floor in a well vented area works out best for me. A wax coating probably works better but it's not necessary. I have skis that are both waxed and not waxed.
post #12 of 23

One other must-do item...

...uncock the heel pieces and take the release setting down to the lowest on the scale...
post #13 of 23
Sell them, start the next season fresh.
post #14 of 23
You may also take a fine look (with loop or some magnification) your edges examining for any cracks or damage before waxing (additionally check topside and lamination). Also consider your ski use and perhaps need for stone grind and recalibration of your bevels (How did they feel this season?) Is your base structure correct for the start of next season? Some of these things are better addressed now rather than the busy beginning of next season with a competent shop.

As SkiRacer55 mentions, does not hurt to back off spring tension and (if your bindings are not sealed) apply lubrication as well as rail slides and check your attachment screws. Take the time for inspection of your boot interface points with bindings and examine your boot sole wear at those points.

Heck, with the closer inspection you may sooner determine if new equipment is needed and begin (at least for me) the budget and justification process heading into next season.

Other than that, I wish you would not have started such a depressing thread and I hope your skis rust…:
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Sell them, start the next season fresh.

LOL
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
These are my new skis for next season, I just got a little jump and started breaking them in early
post #17 of 23
How to summerize your skis depends on where you live, in my experience.

I've lived in CO the past few years and all I need to do is leave them standing up in the garage with a coat of unscraped wax. Rust, humidity & warping are not issues here.

Back when I lived in VT this would have been a recipe for disaster and any edges left bare would be covered in rust come October. So I would GENEROUSLY leave wax on the edges & bases and bring them indoors to a temperature & humidity controlled environment.

As for bindings, releasing the heel is a good idea. The prevailing wisdom these days is that binding springs do not need to be turned down but I've never heard a good compelling argument one way or the other. Personally, I leave my DIN settings alone but turn them down all the way then back to my preset DIN in the fall under the logic that there could be some spring "binding". Dover the bindings if the environment is excessively dirty or dusty.

Of course, YMMV.
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
When you say release the heel, should the back of the binding be up (like there was a boot in) or down (ready too accept a boot)
post #19 of 23

Up like there was a boot in it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jb12string View Post
When you say release the heel, should the back of the binding be up (like there was a boot in) or down (ready too accept a boot)
...DIN down to the minimum...
post #20 of 23
Wax and pack all your skis. Change out the snow tires. It is the best way to bring on a good spring dump!
post #21 of 23
Hide some of the older pairs in your quiver!!!! Last spring, my wife grabbed a few of my older pairs (circa late 80's/early 90's) and had them turned into a ski chair: Nice addition to the patio, and a conversation piece when folks come ovre to the house, but it just hurt me to think of the table saw being taken to some of my old faithfull pairs, and the memories of the 200cm+ days they brought me:
post #22 of 23
Actually, I've kind of got it in my mind that I want to make a chair (or something) out of some of my "vintage" skis.

Look at it this way: every time you sit in it, it'll bring back the relevant memories. And that's easier to do than to ski on them.
post #23 of 23
A ski chair like this or like these? Here's some DIY instructions.
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