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Skiers - Why would you want to learn to ride? - Page 2

post #31 of 49

Because you promised.....

Well, I'm not switching entirely over to snowboarding, but.....

I did promise Princess Tag that I would snowboard with her this season (long story short - I teased her about not doing the things Dad likes, ie. skiing and golf, and her reply was "well, you could snowboard with me".) So, I went out and rented a board, booked a lesson and spent two days riding with my daughter. All I can say is It was really much easier than I expected.

I enjoyed it enough that I'm willing to spend a few days each ski trip on a board, riding with her (but I'll still be spending most of my time on skis).
post #32 of 49
why board? couldn't resist all the fun boarders were having

i skiied for about 20 years. am no tanner hall, but i can pretty much negotiate myself down on any kinda mountain, any kinda terrain on my salomon x-scream 10 pilot.

tried boarding last year. fell all day going down on green/blue. on my second day i started to get a better handle on things. never looked back ever since. every now and then, when i see a really nicely forming mogul run, i am tempted to ski again and i do sometimes. it is a different kind of fun.

i think boarding makes more out of a hill than skiing does. much easier to pickup.

there are many pros and cons for both. both are very fun. i just go either way depending on the mood. just spend much more on board lately.
post #33 of 49
Thread Starter 
A belated welcome to Epic glade! (3 posts in 4 months, eh?)

Funny, when I see a nicely formed mogul run I look at it with a twinkle in my eye thinking "Oh man, if I could just ride it as well as I can ski it". I used to think it was impossible, but I'm getting closer.
post #34 of 49
rusty, thanks. i normally hang out at the alpinezone. i drop by here every now and then. i read a lot of interesting threads here over the years, but never posted. well, here i am.
post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgtrips View Post
My post was meant to be in good humour but the reality is, I have precious few days a winter when I get out to ski . To give up the enjoyment I get from skiing to slog through learning a new and clearly difficult skill just doesn't appeal to me. I still have lots of room for improvement with my skiing technique and I've been at it 32 years.

I am totally impressed when I see people riding with skill - it looks like a lot of fun. If I was one of the 20 plus ski days a year people I would probably give it a go.

K
Those are my sentiments too. Its also the reason why I will go to a ski town like Lake Placid or Killington that has a million things to do other than ski, and I have never experienced any of it...too busy skiing.
post #36 of 49
32 years skiing and still trying to improve? Your best skiing is behind you. Go snowboarding!
post #37 of 49
After learning to ski at an early age then skateboarding all summer every summer for many years, I took a few runs on a board when they first started taking off around 1982. I had years of skateboarding and skiing experience at that point so it wasn't all that difficult for me to do it. But, it just didn't feel right for some reason. I haven't felt the urge to snowboard since. I'm in my mid '40s and still ride a skateboard from time to time. I also surf every summer. For me winter time is skiing time and summer is boarding time. I can also understand why someone that started on a board (surf or skate) might prefer the board year round.
post #38 of 49
I just learned to board last weekend. I was with friends who used to ski but hadn't been on snow in 15 years so we all decided to take a boarding lesson together. For me, I think its a good excuse to learn something that I had wanted to try for years but never wanted to do be a total jong again. But when you are with friends who are new and willing to learn it helps to push you and makes it alot more fun. I think I will try again maybe once or twice later this season. The fact that I was linking turns my first day was pretty cool (well 3 turns on a double green).

Weirdly I sprained my right ankle on my first turn on a snowboard which the instructor said was impossible. I guess I am pushing the boundaries of what injuries are possible. I sprained my left ankle skiing a green run in December. That is supposed to be impossible too according to Beaver Mtn's ski patrol.
post #39 of 49

quid pro quo

learning to snowboard helps your skiing immensely, both in terms of technique, and also in terms of forcing your noggin to learn how to learn, again.
For instructors, crossover snow training is an absolutely excellent way to implement empathy in one's self:
When you're once again a snow sports beginner, you're more empathetic to other snow sports beginners.

Now, take the above paragraph and substitute skiing for snowboard, as the inverse holds just as true.
For snowboarders searching for vast improvement, I steer them toward taking a few days off the board and putting the skis on, first-time-skier or old-timer; they invariably get back on the board with more efficient and aggressive movement.
For alpine competitors who need to work on fall-line commitment, I take them out on skis for a day or two, and huck the figure 11s...when they get back on their race board, they experience a breakthrough in fall-line riding, which is essential for weltcup GS/SG boarding
post #40 of 49
This 61 yr. old took up skiing 3 years ago :. My 10 yr. old son had a lot to do with that! Had/have difficulty with the fear factor and for some bio-mechanical reasons (bowed tibia's) could just not get those skis to work well. So I took to snowboarding the next season, and for similar reasons (fear) could only progress to linking on greens. Two weeks ago, took a pretty hard backside fall (yes, wore a helmet) that left me toast for the remainder of the day. I'm back to skiing.
What is interesting though, my son, who can now do everything on the mountain on a snowboard, wants to ski. Seems there is a resurgence in the sticks, and when we were at Copper a few weeks ago they had the X-games Super-pipe going on and I think there were more contestants on skis than snowboards. Was that my imagination:


Go Rusty, you da Mon! (I'm really envious)

.
post #41 of 49
I tried it for about 3 hours. Now I can rightfully say skiing is more fun. :
Let me tell you.....I spent more time on my butt than boarding. Towards the end I started the get it though. Falling on a board is painful.

I do have a lot more respect for boarders though. I used to rag on my friends who board all the time.
post #42 of 49
I've been toying with the idea of boarding for backcountry. I prefer snowshoeing to touring skis for access, so carrying/descending with a board would be a natural. Don't feel much like learning, though.
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simplemind View Post
This 61 yr. old took up skiing 3 years ago :. My 10 yr. old son had a lot to do with that! Had/have difficulty with the fear factor and for some bio-mechanical reasons (bowed tibia's) could just not get those skis to work well. So I took to snowboarding the next season, and for similar reasons (fear) could only progress to linking on greens. Two weeks ago, took a pretty hard backside fall (yes, wore a helmet) that left me toast for the remainder of the day. I'm back to skiing.
What is interesting though, my son, who can now do everything on the mountain on a snowboard, wants to ski. Seems there is a resurgence in the sticks, and when we were at Copper a few weeks ago they had the X-games Super-pipe going on and I think there were more contestants on skis than snowboards. Was that my imagination:


Go Rusty, you da Mon! (I'm really envious)

.
Way more skiers here at Les Arcs than boarders, even among the younger guys and at the park...locals say boarding peaked a few years ago and has been declining.

Myself, I started boarding when I lived in Vegas ('94) because the local mountain 45 minutes away did not seem to be enough of a challenge to ski...perfect place to learn to board which I did for 3 years before moving to Florida and not touching snow for 3 years.

Enjoyed boarding for many of the reasons listed above including making a boring hill fun, being able to hang with less skilled riders and the chance to make rapid progression. Main downside for me is that boarding falls seem harder and more sudden when I catch an edge...can go many days without falling skiing, but not there yet on a board.

In '00 at Copper, CO went back to skiing after a 6 year absense and have only been on a board a handful of times since. Planned to mix boarding and skiing this year, but have enjoyed the skiing enough so far not to bother renting (or buying) a board. New shaped skis have definitely allowed for progression in a sport I thought I had plateaued out in.
post #44 of 49
My girlfriend snowboards. Every time we get off of a chairlift and I have to wait for her to strap in her boot I am reminded why I have no interest in snowboarding.
post #45 of 49
devil advocate....intermiate snowboarder who actually does like the change of pace from expert level skiing = me

why wouldnt you learn to ride.

1.traversing when someone stop infront of you sucks
2.you have a blindside and skiers and even other boarders dont pay attention to that
3.sidestepping what sidestepping
4.bumps are alot harder on a board or maybe I just suck
5.straping in sucks
6.sitting down sucks
7.flats suck balls
8.falling in flats sucks even worse

9.there is nothing you can do on a board better than you can do on skis now that we have stolen all your technogoly
post #46 of 49
Easy on the ball sucking there, pal. Someone who hasn't lost all respect for you yet might read this. One of your children students? Your director? Act as if you are speaking in public and being recorded, because you are.
post #47 of 49
I'm wondering if boarding is easier on the knees than skiing is. It might be worth doing for that reason.
I haven't fallen in years, and have never suffered any kind of injury without falling (never ran into anything; never tore anything; etc), but I do see people fall on skis all the time and suffer twising injuries that badly damage their legs.
It doesn't seem as if that would happen with both feet strapped to the board in a fixed relationship. I may try it.
post #48 of 49
Skiers - Why would you want to learn to ride?

Um, a desire to resemble the noble manatee?

post #49 of 49
Thread Starter 
After such an eclectic series of posts, I can't resist.

VA - um .. nice pic. Not sure how it relates to the topic unless it's some vague reference to swimming with the fishes.

Phlog - I've found that riding is easier on the knees than skiing with a couple of exceptions. Although riders in general have less ACL injuries than skiers, ACL riding injuries tend to be more associated with landing jumps. Also, when riding on hardpack and stopping by dropping to your knees, the kneecaps can get a little sore. With knowledge, these problems can be avoided.

Rod - That's perfectly acceptable language for kids these days. Nice try though.

Bush, Bush, Bush - The topic was why, not why not. But now that you mention it, there are a few myths to bust in your list.

1.traversing when someone stop infront of you sucks
When you can turn using your ankles, this issue is no different whether one is on skis or a board except when you're on one of those Snowbird single track traverses and following a bonehead too closely. In that case, when you must leave the track, it's easier to get back onto it when riding a board and easier to cut a new track when you have to.

2.you have a blindside and skiers and even other boarders dont pay attention to that
A rider has a blind side only if they don't look there. Other people are not responsible for respecting your blind side.

3.sidestepping what sidestepping
Try the frog hop.

4.bumps are alot harder on a board or maybe I just suck
It is a lot harder to cheat in bumps on a board. Bumps on skis are all about simultaneous leg movements. Bumps on boards are all about sequential leg movements. Otherwise extension and absorption work the same.

5.straping in sucks
You don't have to if you don't want to.

6.sitting down sucks
You don't have to if you don't want to.

7.flats suck balls
This is true. It's not much better on skis, but they are worse on a board. If you have skier friends, a lent pole or a tow can work wonders.

8.falling in flats sucks even worse
Don't do that then. When you're skilled, this is not an issue. When you're not, falling is generally not fun no matter where you do it.

9.there is nothing you can do on a board better than you can do on skis now that we have stolen all your technogoly
Oh really? Surf's up grasshopper! I think we've just found the reason you need to progress from intermediate to expert level riding.
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