EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Neox Mounting Instruction
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Neox Mounting Instruction

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi, new to the forum.

I bought new Metron 10's with Neox 614 bindings off ebay. They arrived in excellent condition but without any instruction on how to mount the bindings and the plate. Just looking at it and having scoured this forum I have a pretty good idea on how to put them together. I want to make sure I do it right and not have it fall apart on me. It would be nice if someone who have the instruction can send them to me pdf/scanned/whatever. Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 23
No instructions since you shouldn't be doing it yourself. Have a pro mount them and make sure they are safe.

Mike
post #3 of 23
Putting them together is one thing making sure they are adjusted properly with the correct pressures and turquing is another. For the 25-45 to have a pro do it is money well spent.
post #4 of 23
I also bought some Atomics with Neox bindings off of e-bay, but mine did come with mounting instructions. They are really very simple to mount but I would not suggest trying it without having a set of instuctions. Have you tried checking the Atomic web site to see if you can download a set?

If you can get the instructions and are reasonably mechanically inclined I would think that you could mount them yourself and then take them to a shop to have them dial in the settings and check the release. With the Metron/Neox rail-plate system it is pretty much just a matter of putting in about 16 screws in the proper order with the appropriate torque. Check this thread for a little insight.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...highlight=Neox
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
thanks for the thread link, I'm pretty much having the same trouble as the first poster, the back plate still has a gap to the ski and it really takes a good crank to get the plate down. After that, it is rather simple to put the rest together. The neox sliding rails system makes it super easy to set the distance and it is just minor adjustments to the forward pressure screw.
post #6 of 23
If you are adjusting them yourself make sure that you can click the toe in with a thin plastic coated card (like an insurace card) under the boot toe. You should be able to wiggle the card out pretty easily with just a little resistance from the AF plate. The Neox toes are suppose to have an automatic height adjustment, but I've never completely trusted those types of things.
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
how do you make the toe height adjustment?
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
Hi, new to the forum.

I bought new Metron 10's with Neox 614 bindings off ebay. They arrived in excellent condition but without any instruction on how to mount the bindings and the plate. Just looking at it and having scoured this forum I have a pretty good idea on how to put them together. I want to make sure I do it right and not have it fall apart on me. It would be nice if someone who have the instruction can send them to me pdf/scanned/whatever. Thanks in advance.
I believe I still have the instructions from my bindings. I can scan them tonight if you want.

It's pretty easy. Screw in the toe plate, screw in the heel plate. Slide the toe piece in, slide the heel piece in. Make the scale on each piece match to your boot sole size at the mark on the binding closer to the rear of the binding (if you're mounting the "normal" position). Insert boot and look at forward pressure screw on the back of the binding. If it's not flush, remove boot and turn it in or out. Put boot back in and check again. Repeat until screw sits flush with back of binding. Do not turn screw with boot in binding.

Adjust your DIN and you're good to go.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
If you can scan them it would be much appreciated.

The process you've described is pretty much what I've done. I kinda figured it all out just by looking at the parts, but I would just like to see the manual to see the fine details of the bindings.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
how do you make the toe height adjustment?
Not sure if there even is one. My instructions say that "the Neox has an automatic toe height adjustment in the 19 mm plus or minus 1.5mm range." I just wanted to make sure that your mounting job didn't result in the toe not working right. It says you "check the toe piece by pressing the boot ca. 10mm out of the binding and then releasing it. It should return evenly."

I have no idea what a "ca." is.

As Johnnythan said, it is important not to adjust the forward pressure with the boot in the binding. This can result in partially stripping the screw, which can make your heels prerelease under minor load. It is a minor pain to keep taking the boot in and out while trying to get the adjustment screw flush, but that's the way you need to do it.
post #11 of 23
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
thanks a lot

It seems I did everything correctly, I just need to somehow screw hard enough to get the binding flush with the ski.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
thanks a lot

I just need to somehow screw hard enough to get the binding flush with the ski.
Careful, if you screw too hard you can crack the mounting plate, and then you're screwed.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
thanks a lot

It seems I did everything correctly, I just need to somehow screw hard enough to get the binding flush with the ski.
I've got a super tiny little sliver of space between the binding and the mounting plate on one ski. I'm really not worried about it. That screw is in there awfully well.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
It says you "check the toe piece by pressing the boot ca. 10mm out of the binding and then releasing it. It should return evenly." I have no idea what a "ca." is.
just so we don't leave ya hanging, mudfoot:

"ca." is shorthand for "circa" ... meaning "about" in Latin. Often used for dates, like "I think I was born ca. 1957, but I hit my head skiing and can no longer remember the exact year."

In this case, "about 10mm, give or take a little bit of wiggle room."
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
If you are adjusting them yourself make sure that you can click the toe in with a thin plastic coated card (like an insurace card) under the boot toe. You should be able to wiggle the card out pretty easily with just a little resistance from the AF plate. The Neox toes are suppose to have an automatic height adjustment, but I've never completely trusted those types of things.
You don't have a choice other than to trust it, since you can't adjust it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
how do you make the toe height adjustment?
You two are the reason people should be taking their gear to pros. This is NO toe height adjustment. Get it done right or have someone who has done it a few times before guide you through it.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
You two are the reason people should be taking their gear to pros. This is NO toe height adjustment. Get it done right or have someone who has done it a few times before guide you through it.
Kaesar mounted the bindings without instructions and seemed intent on not taking it to a shop even though he was not able to screw all the daylight out of the bindings. Regardless of the auto toe height adjustment, the bindings will not release correctly if they are not mounted right. I gave him a simple test to see if the toe height was right. If you want to trust the toes just because the height isn't adjustable go right ahead, or you can trust whatever "pro" may end up working on your equipment at the shop. Personally, I have seen too many marginally trained teenagers with power tools screw up very expensive ski equipment to have a lot of faith in most ski shops' "expertise."

When it comes to my bindings releasing I don't trust auto-adjustments or most ski shop personel. Contrary to your statement that "you don't have a choice other than to trust it, you can't adjust it," whenever possible I check it myself. That's my choice and I'm sorry if you think it was stupid for passing it on to Kaesar.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Personally, I have seen too many marginally trained teenagers with power tools screw up very expensive ski equipment to have a lot of faith in most ski shops' "expertise."

That's my choice and I'm sorry if you think it was stupid for passing it on to Kaesar.
Sorry man, I was grumpy last night. My apologies.

I agree with you about the "experts" - I used to work with them. I don't think you're stupid - at all. But without the ability to adjust toe height, the card trick doesn't really work. It will really only tell you if your boots are really worn out.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
But without the ability to adjust toe height, the card trick doesn't really work. It will really only tell you if your boots are really worn out.
I figured if you are brave or (fill in your own adjective) enough to mount you own bindings and not get them checked by a shop, the card test is probably the best thing you can do on your own to see if the toe fit is acceptable. That combined with the 10mm push/return test will at least let someone know if their toes will release. The amount of pressure it will take can only be assessed with machines you'll find in a ski shop. Old school just requires you to be able to twist yourself out while standing still, but that's not a test I would recommend to anyone because you can hurt yourself.

I will join you in going on record as saying that mounting your own bindings is not a good idea unless you are experienced, although the Neox bindings are so simple it is hard to resist home "mounting."
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
I am an engineer. Putting things together is my specialty.

Seriously though, I posted on this forum so I can get information/idea from people who do have experience. It's just a bit of due diligence research that anyone can do. From the information I gathered I determined the neox bindings are obvious enough that I can do it myself. I'm not just some goof who wants to save a few bucks.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaesar View Post
I'm not just some goof who wants to save a few bucks.
None of us are! I'll try not to mention that I mount my own bindings and don't have them "properly" tested either... I run mainly Salomon's (never had even ONE fail a test when I used to work in a shop - can't say that for Marker...), and have been mounting my own gear since the mid-90's. Although I don't condone NOT testing your gear, I don't do it myself beyond the rubber mallet trick.

The Neox were very easy to mount, and if you understand the concept of forward pressure and proper adjustments, they're downright easy. I'm sure someone will be able to get you directions. Good luck, and be careful!

Chris
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
jonnythan already posted the instructions above

I realized why I was having such a hard time getting the heel base plate down. During shipping/storage/whenever, it was kept with the brake fixer on. This in turn slowly warped the metal base piece of the brake spring downwards. When you place the heel base plate on to the ski, the warp causes a huge void in the middle of the plate. I ended up taking the advice from the other thread. I used a clamp to clamp the whole plate down before screwing it tight. Now I don't have any space between the binding and the ski.

Thanks for everyone's help.
post #23 of 23

I have a pair of Neox 6-14 bindings installed on a pair of never-used skis. The Neox plate is mounted directly onto/into the top of the ski - no additional plate/riser/anything on the ski itself. I've taken the bindings and plates off. Of the 8 mounting screws per binding the 4 front (toe piece) mounting screws all are the same and about 14 mm long. The front 2 rear (heel piece) mounting screws are about 18mm long, and the back 2  rear mounting screws 20 mm long. All of the screws, front and back, when screwed in to the plate fully protrude about 8mm below the bottom of the plate.

 

I have a pair of Metron 11 B5 skis that I acquired without bindings, but they were previously mounted with Neox 4-12's. The Metron's have an integrated riser that's drilled for the Neox 4-12's, and the drill holes match up perfectly with the Neox 4-16 plates. I'll need some skinnier brakes, but everything else looks good to just move the bindings over. Here's a pic partway through the process...

 

 

Have a few questions...

 

All the Neox 6-14 mounting screws seem to be in good shape (threads/heads intact). Does anyone know if the 8mm effective screw length below the plate is appropriate for mounting the plates onto/into the Metron's integrated plastic riser?

 

I was thinking I'd use something like Loctite Blue on the mounting screws when I install the plate on the Metron, but it's not recommended for use on plastic. Epoxy seems like overkill. Anyone use anything else to help keep mounting screws in a plastic plate firmly in place?

 

Whoever installed the Neox 6-14's on the previous skis put a little dab of some kind of glue directly under the plate where the mounting screws went through into the ski. Good idea? If so, what kind of glue?

 

TIA.

 

Atomicman has already kindly offered me some advice on some of this through PM, but I thought I'd run this by the board to see what feedback any others might have based on personal experience.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Neox Mounting Instruction