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is skiing dangerous? - Page 3

post #61 of 75
My Personal Experience:

Age: 55

1965 - Fractured left Tibia/Fibula due to improperly adjusted binding release. At age 14 I wasn't as indestructible as I thought I was.

1968 - riding motorcycle when lost it making sharp turn in gravel landed in farmers front yard. Banged knee, broke shifter lever. Was able to drive bike home. Many close calls on motorcycle driving about 30,000 miles. No other injuries.

1974 - riding bike when hit by car that went through stop sign. No injuries, bike was destroyed, driver of car hit and run.

1985 - skiing agout 20 MPH when hit from rear by very good skier going 50+MPH. Only me and other skier on trail. Other skier just lost it just before he passed me. I had 4 fractured ribs and 3 skull fractures. Other skier displocated shoulder with ligament damage. I was hospitalized for 4 days and was not allowed to drive for 6 weeks. No helmet.

1987 - Flipped 12 year old truck on icy conditions. No injuries. Went to hospital as a precaution.

Before 1997 skied maybe 5 times a year.

1996 joined ski patrol ski 40+ days a year, which includes 6 to 10 days a year at Jackson Hole and other western resorts.

Knock on wood no injuries since 1987.

Four days ago I came extremely close to hitting a jeep that made a left turn right in front of me when I was doing 50MPH. Other driver was blinded by Sun and could not see me. That was damn close.

Is skiing dangerous? Driving a car is still more dangerous.
post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestEast View Post
I thought this was an interesting bit from the article: "Most of those fatally injured are usually above-average skiers and snowboarders who are going at high rates of speed on the margins of intermediate trails.Most of those fatally injured are usually above-average skiers and snowboarders who are going at high rates of speed on the margins of intermediate trails."

I can believe it. I bet a lot of those fatalities are from trying to pass unpredictable slow people on the margin, and having them move unexpectedly. A friend blew out his ACL doing that a couple weeks ago. It's always frustrating getting stuck behind slow people.
I would agree with that too. The closest I came to colliding with someone in the past 5 years was when I was skiing at a moderate speed on the right edge of a sweeping blue run and a beginner in front of me turned unexpectedly onto the edge of the run and towards a snow cannon. Luckily I was just able to squeeze through the gap with one ski running over the front of his skis and both of us stayed on our skis and were uninjured but it was a close call.
post #63 of 75

Death at Aspen Yesterday

Apparently a Dutch tourist died yesterday at Aspen, according to the news report he was wearing a helmet but hit a tree. Ruptured spleen?

The news said it was the fifth fatality at Aspen this year, which seems on the high side for a single resort.

Kaj
post #64 of 75
The ski area association compiles stats.

YOU SHOULD EXPECT to be injured about 2.5 time in every 1000 ski days.

You should NOT EXPECT to die.

But that could happen too.

Sorry ;-)

CalG
post #65 of 75

It's momentum

Sad news,

My son goes to NU.



http://www.unionleader.com/article.a...2-89fc0c26fcb7
post #66 of 75
uugggghhhhhh

life can be so cruel- RIP Adrienne and may all who knew her find some peace as well-
post #67 of 75
Of course skiing is dangerous, just like any other "adventure" sport. What matters is how you choose to manage that risk.

I kayak (ww and sea), mtb, ski. Each has it's own risk associated with it. I've been injured skiing and mtb, but not kayaking. But it's kayaking (ww) that scares me the most -- at least in terms of upping the risk ante. I primarily boat Class III water, with some relatively easy Class IV under the right conditions. I know I have the skills to boat harder stuff -- but I have two kids, and the PERCEIVED risk is too great for me to justify.

Same with skiing for me -- I venture a bit farther each year in terms of pushing the envelope of what I can do (for example, finally learned teh joys of bump adn glade skiing in the past couple of seasons. But I push it gradually, and I'm not ashamed to say "i'm not ready for that, and maybe I never will be." In general, I dont' perceive skiing as beign as dangerous as ww paddling -- at least most typical resort skiing anyway. Of course, there is plenty of stuff in-bounds at lots of resorts that are out of my league -- and I know that...doesn't bother me. Again, I believe I have the skills to push farther than I do -- but I dont' have the desire. I have as much, or more fun than anyone out there, without upping the danger ante beyond my comfort level.

As far as skiing -- what scares me the most is other people. And even then my concern is for my wife and kids. I'm 5'11, 210 lbs and pretty muscular. Most people are going to lose a collision with me, unless it's at ultra high velocity. But my littlest one is only 50 lbs, and she likes to go fast. So I mitigate the risk for them by avoiding the mid-day crowded hours -- we ski early (8:30 - 12:30) or later (3:00 to 7:00). I see so many people out of control, skiing way beyond their ability, that it's nuts to be there during the mid afternoon hours.

Maybe I'm more risk averse than a lot of people, but I'm always thinking about how to manage the risk for me and whoever is with me -- and still have fun and even manage to push to improve or challenge our abilities.

billy
post #68 of 75

death rates for skiing less than 1/1,000,000 days participation

skiing appears to extend life, since the death rate for living is greater than 1/40,000 days participation
post #69 of 75
Dammit! Now I'm injured. First time in over a decade, and hopefully minor. Skiing backwards, doing a 45 slip and looking uphill in heavy snowfall I failed to see the large chunk which caught my edge, dropping me backwards and putting a hurting to my shoulder.

Hopefully only out for a couple more days. Who needs shoulders to ski anyway?
post #70 of 75
This is Jer speaking skiing may be dangerous but man is the most dangerous game of all.
post #71 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Dammit! Now I'm injured. First time in over a decade, and hopefully minor. Skiing backwards, doing a 45 slip and looking uphill in heavy snowfall I failed to see the large chunk which caught my edge, dropping me backwards and putting a hurting to my shoulder.

Hopefully only out for a couple more days. Who needs shoulders to ski anyway?
Haha yeah skiing switch is really hard...ive finally been getting much better at it but catching an edge is hard stuff. I came very close to slicing my wrist open with my skis trying to do a 180 onto a bad landing, looked like I was emo for a couple days...
post #72 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post
skiing appears to extend life, since the death rate for living is greater than 1/40,000 days participation
Yep. As I read it, while dangerous, skiing is not as dangerous as not skiing, you're safer on the slopes than off. More time spent skiing means better odds of avoiding an untimely death.
post #73 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Dammit! Now I'm injured. First time in over a decade, and hopefully minor. Skiing backwards, doing a 45 slip and looking uphill in heavy snowfall I failed to see the large chunk which caught my edge, dropping me backwards and putting a hurting to my shoulder.

Hopefully only out for a couple more days. Who needs shoulders to ski anyway?
Ouch. Get that checked, Harry. I wish you a speedy recovery.

Skiing switch in heavy snowfall? A 45 slip?
post #74 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
I kayak (ww and sea), mtb, ski. Each has it's own risk associated with it. I've been injured skiing and mtb, but not kayaking. But it's kayaking (ww) that scares me the most -- at least in terms of upping the risk ante. I primarily boat Class III water, with some relatively easy Class IV under the right conditions. I know I have the skills to boat harder stuff -- but I have two kids, and the PERCEIVED risk is too great for me to justify.
Yes, I also used to WW kayak 50 or more days per summer. I did Class IV fairly regularly, although they were all lines I was very familiar with.

I haven't been able to WW kayak as much the last few years, and I find that, without regular practice, my skill is decreasing and my perceived risk is increasing.

I've always been a bit surprised at how few skiers go WW kayaking. When asked, it becomes evident that the perceived risk is very high for them, so they don't do it.

This is easy to understand, I suppose. When you fall down skiing, you will, on most slopes, slide to a stop fairly quickly. At this point, you can, at your leisure, collect any gear you left behind, get yourself put back together, and proceed merrily on your way. And, while all this is going on, you get to breathe. (I've always been a big fan of breathing, myself.)

When you flip a WW kayak, you have a problem that you have to solve fairly quickly, because you don't get to breathe until you either roll back up or get out of the boat. If you get out of the boat, you might get to breathe, at least intermittently, but your problem is now ongoing, because you are not going to stop, impact with rocks is a distinct probability, and you need to hang on to both your boat and your paddle, which limits your ability to actually control where you're going.

And flipping a kayak in serious whitewater is a rather common event. It's not really surprising that it's a niche sport with relatively few participants compared to skiing. Can you imagine teaching someone to ski if they knew they would have to stop breathing for a while every time they fell down??

Last summer, I missed a roll for the first time in about five years, mostly due to lack of practice in turbulent water. I was in a hole and didn't wait long enough to set up. It was someting of a reality check.

Anyway, I now sea kayak on big inland lakes in British Columbia. I'm farther from shore, but the perceived risk is much lower. And, unlike many sea kayakers, I have very good high and low braces, and I can roll back up if I flip.

Quote:
Same with skiing for me -- I venture a bit farther each year in terms of pushing the envelope of what I can do (for example, finally learned teh joys of bump adn glade skiing in the past couple of seasons. But I push it gradually, and I'm not ashamed to say "i'm not ready for that, and maybe I never will be." In general, I dont' perceive skiing as beign as dangerous as ww paddling -- at least most typical resort skiing anyway. Of course, there is plenty of stuff in-bounds at lots of resorts that are out of my league -- and I know that...doesn't bother me. Again, I believe I have the skills to push farther than I do -- but I dont' have the desire. I have as much, or more fun than anyone out there, without upping the danger ante beyond my comfort level.
I ski a lot more than I kayak. I, too, enjoy bumps, trees, powder and steeps. I'm familiar with basic snow mechanics, and I'm very conservative when it comes to avalanche risk. At my age, I avoid cliffs. My perceived risk is low, barring collision with an immoveable object.

Billy is correct. You use experience and skill to manage risk. If you don't have much of either, you dial back the terrain and watch for other skiers, although it is admittedly difficult to watch for them when you lack experience. If you don't have much experience or skill, but too much testosterone, risk is higher.

Skiing is not risk free - but at least you get to breathe when you fall down.
post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
Last summer, I missed a roll for the first time in about five years, mostly due to lack of practice in turbulent water. I was in a hole and didn't wait long enough to set up. It was someting of a reality check.

Anyway, I now sea kayak on big inland lakes in British Columbia. I'm farther from shore, but the perceived risk is much lower. And, unlike many sea kayakers, I have very good high and low braces, and I can roll back up if I flip.
That about describes my experience; I blew a roll about 15 years ago in some very rough water and it killed my confidence for whitewater kayaking. Been a sea kayaker ever since (which has also produced some hairy moments at times, but not nearly as many). Skiing feels safer and less dangerous than both sports to me. But I am a resort skier who only occasionally ventures from lift served terrain. I bet if there were stats for backcountry skiing, it would probably be more inline with kayaking. Certainly the risks are higher for BC skiing.
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