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1 yr MA(version 2.0) with video

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
BillA graciously offered to shoot some video of me doing some turns yesterday so again thanks BillA.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...74639690044289
Shot on blueish terrain, early morning groomed. The last clip is shot amongst some serious out of control traffic that came out of nowhere so those bodies shooting by block out a frame or two every now and then. Mainly Medium to short radius. The best resolution I could get it at for web streaming (since I don't run a server).


And here I am last season
http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...37881964500793



Good/bad/ugly comments all appreciated....thought a before/after would be a bit more challenging than the usual in-situ video clips posted:


edit: I forgot to add, Since last season, I've worked with a CSIA L4examiner, a few PSIA L3's and of course BillA has been giving me pointers every time we ski together....
post #2 of 21
Makwendo99, that video from last year looks familiar. You posted it here before, didn't you? Made some nice progress since then. Your stance and fore/aft balance looks pretty good.

BillA, are you working with him at all? The turn shape has smoothed out some, and the pivot entry and body english has been tempered a bit. You have anything to do with it?
post #3 of 21
OK, mak, I'm up to speed now. I believe you're a level 1 PSIA working toward level 2? With that in mind I will point out that I'm not a PSIA guy, but will tell you how I would go about working with you to guide you along the road to becoming an even better skier. I think what I tell you may help toward the PSIA quest you're on, too.

Your video is broken into three segments, the first one being the best for MA value. Your skiing has come leaps and bounds from last season, but you still have a couple major things that need work, and they're related:

1)You're still doing an up move at the end of your turns (observe your old outside knee extend at the end of your turn and through the transtion)

2) You're still pivoting (though not as much as last year) as you enter your turns

You're doing #1 to facilitate #2. You need to SLOW DOWN the direction change you create at the beginning of your turns so that the time and distance it takes to produce the first half of your turns total direction change (initiation to apex) is the same as the time and distance it takes to produce the second half of your total direction change (apex to completion).

Right now the first half is happening in the blink of an eye, barely before you're even fully edge engaged, via a pivot, then the second half of the turn is more controlled and gradual. The turn shape from start to finish IS NOT consistent. Make sense?

Clean up the turn shape, make it consistent, and the need for the up move will go away. I would suggest finding a top level trainer who has this down pat, tell him what you're trying to accomplish, have him lay down tracks of the transition and turn shape I'm speaking about, then follow them to get a feel for it.

If you're training on your own, reverse what you're doing now. Make the direction change that takes place from initiation to apex much slow and gradual than that taking place from apex to completion. From there, once that's comfortable, you can dial it back to first half/second half consistent.

Once you get the turn shape under control, and have eliminated the pivot, you need to make sure the no longer needed up move is gone too. Focus on the old outside leg/knee at the end of your turns. DO NOT allow it/them to extend. Make your first move either a relaxation and shortening of the old outside leg, or a slight push down on the old inside foot.

Either one of those options will transfer your weight to your old inside (uphill) foot, and cause your body to begin moving across your skis and into the new turn. As you body begins this automatic cross over action, flex and tip your old outside/new inside (downhill) leg into the new turn, and begin a VERY subtle steering of the feet (if a steered turn is your goal). Presto, up move is gone.

From there I would have you work on varying your turn shapes, and refining your entry level balance, rotary, and flexion/extension skills, in preparation for working toward well executed basic carved turns. Next it would be back to fundamental skill devellopment amped up to a higher level,,, and then dynamic carving and transition option expansion.

Got a ways to go, as you can see, but the fun is in the process. Enjoy.
post #4 of 21
Mandatory Disclaimer: I am not a PSIA Level blah blah or anything, just an amature (instructor, but high level skier) giving my opinion so take my few comments with a grain of salt.

When I watch both of your movies I see a lot of the same thing s from last year in this years video. It seems to me like you are not really using your skis. You start the turn then seem to "push out your heels" to control your seed, if that makes any sense. This movement is causing your tails to slide out. Giving the impression that you are making little speed dumps all the way down the mountain instead of carving. In my opinion you should work on getting the ski on edge and using the side cut to carry your skis through the turn. Try making larger radius turns that end with a traverse across the fall line before starting the next turn that way you can use the hill to slow yourself down while working on technique instead of having to make mini hockey stops down the hill.

One positive though is that your pole plant's seem to be timed well.

Just my .02, I'm sure my comments will either be validated or contradicted by one of the more "qualified" MA'ers
post #5 of 21
Wow, big improvement!


Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
One positive though is that your pole plant's seem to be timed well.

Just my .02, I'm sure my comments will either be validated or contradicted by one of the more "qualified" MA'ers
I too am unqualified.

Play with less weight distibution. You are placing 60/40 ??? between your skis. Why don't you try getting on the outside (down hill ski) more. Have your coach watch and guide you. There is a lot of emphasis on skiing both skis which is good, but you might find this helpful, even as a drill.

On the poles, you're late. Also, on the short turns try blocking pole plants. Try slower speed truns, blocking pole plants.
post #6 of 21

MA-my .02 cents

Hi Mak,

I have been working for a couple of seasons now on slowing down my turn transitions. Im finally getting there and feel like I can make these turns on more and more terrain and in different conditions. I am a level 2 working towards level 3 right now, and the following exercises work well for me.

by the way, You have definitely improved over last years video.



-one footed skiing (w/both skis on!):
I use this as a warm up to each run. a few turns on one foot, then a few on the other. NOTE: You dont have to lift the other foot off the snow much at all as this sets up goofy angles and forces you to alter your balance un naturally. This should be fairly challenging for you at first, but see if (on very moderate terrain) you can smooth out and slow down the turn transition. You should feel your ski arc cleanly in both directions---I am not saying you have to feel a pure carve, just a nice controlled arc.

go from this exercise to short radius turns:
Blend the one footed skiing into medium to short radius turns. You'll notice a difference in your skiing. This should give you an awareness for both edges of both skis as you move from turn to turn. See how long you can keep this up until your bad habits start creeping back in, then stop along the trail and start the process again. I would choose moderate terrain...an easy blue to start with, then move up as your comfort level dictates.


On another day, or later in the day, try the following:

Pivot Slips:

this exercise is great for upper/lower body flexibility. Ask a clinician or upper level skier familiar with this one to go out and take a few runs with you as this one can be tricky to master. (Its great for bumps, short radius turns, steeps...) I find this one frustrating at times, but it always makes my skiing better......

railroad tracks:

The old stand by....but add this progression for a lot of fun.

1) traverse: traverse across the trail till you stop...then let gravity take you backwards and try to arc back across the snow. You can try this falling leaf style, too, working your way down the trail. (watch for traffic!)

2) start with your skis pointing down the fall line and railroad track through the fall line and then across the trail. be sure to do this in both directions. (watch for traffic)

3) linked rr track turns. Watch out for that quick transition. you should really feel your edges hooking up and no skidding. pick a wide trail thats not too steep. a nice green trail works great!



these are great fun for me, AND I get alot out of them....


Enjoy the snow!

JPSKI
post #7 of 21

2 cents from yet another MA hack

Makwendo,

Here's what I see (much the same as Rick and PhilT): Good fun energetic skiing, great rhythm, engaging the inside edge above the fall line, smooth pole swing, good pole timing and location of touch relative to your turn shape, centered neutral stance and some very good angulation occurring just after the fall line. That's the good news. I'm also seeing pushing of the outside ski at turn finish (note my references to your turns is off sequence with Rick's description but we're talking about the same thing), upper body movement and sequential edge change during turn initiation.

Let's go to the video tape and look at the good news first.
(note time references use the time code embedded in the video which has a jump from 24 seconds to 1 minute 3, this still was from 1 minute 5 seconds, which may show as 26 seconds in your viewer)


This is very good angulation for this slope pitch and speed. But your maximum angulation is happening slightly after the fall line. We want it to happen a tiny bit earlier in the turn. We'll see the reason why this is late in a bit.

(this is from 1 minute 3 seconds)

The most extreme example of finishing your turns with a down push is that your weight gets so far back that the ski tips come up (see the left ski). This only happened once in the clip, but the up and down movement is consistent in your skiing. What I see is that your weight gets down and back at the end of the turn. You get a brief speed check and the tails start to break away briefly, then you let off with your up and upper body forward move to start the next turn.
(this is the next frame)


The problem is your inside leg can not collapse when the upper body starts the movement into the new turn. Since the outside leg is turning, the result is a wedge.

(the next left turn at 1 minute 5 seconds)

For the finish of the next right turn/start of the next left turn, note that the outside ski is on a slightly higher edge angle providing the brace for the finishing push. This is before the upper body launch.

(this is the next frame)

Can you see the torso leaning forward?

(this is 2 frames later)

Yikes! There's that wedge again.

(this is from the turn from 14-16 seconds)

In this animated sequence, you can clearly see the lateral lean to the inside as the cause of the skis getting ahead and the weight getting back. I left out a couple of frames between steps 3 and 4, but step 4 shows the wedge as the inevitable result again. The wedge provides the speed control to enable the weight re-centering of the upper body coming forward. From there you can finish the turn as Rick has described.

Here's what I want to see:
Parallel skis throughout the turn, simultaneous edge changes instead of sequential edge changes and inside leg collapse during turn initiation instead of upper body movement.

Here's how to do it:
Focus on learning new turn initiation movements in longer radius turns first before gradually tightening into shorter radius turns. With a longer radius turn, you will be able to perform a turn finish with the skis more across the hill or even with an uphill component to the finish. From this position you will be better able to perform a turn initiation move beginning with an extension of the uphill ankle. This will cause the hips to move diagonally forward into the new turn and simultaneously facilitate an inside leg collapse. (Note: The PMTS approach teaches to lift and tip the inside ski. Either focus can get to the same end result).

Exercises that can help:
Tracer turns, White Pass turns, Pivot slips, Skate move to start turns
Traverses where you raise the downhill ski slightly off the snow by only extending the uphill ankle (vs lifting the downhill leg)
Railroad track turns are a good test to see if you own the movements, but my opinion is that they don't give you as much direct negative feedback when you are not doing the movements (although the tracks can show you have not "got it", the turns can still feel pretty good).

Final note:
Although I've picked on three right turn finishes/left turn initiations, I can see the same problems to a lesser extent in your other turns. I'm not an alignment specialist, but your wedge stills just look odd to me. If I had spare money to bet, I'd say that your left boot could use some canting. Although a change in technique alone can greatly improve your performance, the root cause of your issues could be alignment. Have you had your alignment checked since your last boot purchase? If not, you may find it worthwhile to get checked before you try to change your skiing.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
rusty, that 'wedge' seems more and more to be an alignment issue to me as well.
I've had underbinding cants installed under my skis as my boots are on their last season and didn't want the expensive option for very little. (long story short, store #1 sold me the wrong boots for my foot-type before I knew any better. I had a decent bootfitter from store#2 remedy as much as he could but not completely fix issues). I had this done last season and in hindsight, I really wouldn't have been able to notice a big difference anyhow (lack of basic skills) so when I was told to play with different duct tape layers to experiment, my feedback to the bootfiter was probably off.
As I've been gradually 'improving' this season, I've noticed I can ski on 1 ski (left) with much more ease than my right. Since the season is just about shot here the new boots will have to wait but I know for sure alignment is in part a problem...user error obviously exists as well!
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Makwendo,

Here's what I see (much the same as Rick and PhilT): Good fun energetic skiing, great rhythm, engaging the inside edge above the fall line, smooth pole swing, good pole timing and location of touch relative to your turn shape, centered neutral stance and some very good angulation occurring just after the fall line. That's the good news. I'm also seeing pushing of the outside ski at turn finish (note my references to your turns is off sequence with Rick's description but we're talking about the same thing), upper body movement and sequential edge change during turn initiation.

Let's go to the video tape and look at the good news first.
(note time references use the time code embedded in the video which has a jump from 24 seconds to 1 minute 3, this still was from 1 minute 5 seconds, which may show as 26 seconds in your viewer)


This is very good angulation for this slope pitch and speed. But your maximum angulation is happening slightly after the fall line. We want it to happen a tiny bit earlier in the turn. We'll see the reason why this is late in a bit.

(this is from 1 minute 3 seconds)

The most extreme example of finishing your turns with a down push is that your weight gets so far back that the ski tips come up (see the left ski). This only happened once in the clip, but the up and down movement is consistent in your skiing. What I see is that your weight gets down and back at the end of the turn. You get a brief speed check and the tails start to break away briefly, then you let off with your up and upper body forward move to start the next turn.
(this is the next frame)


The problem is your inside leg can not collapse when the upper body starts the movement into the new turn. Since the outside leg is turning, the result is a wedge.

(the next left turn at 1 minute 5 seconds)

For the finish of the next right turn/start of the next left turn, note that the outside ski is on a slightly higher edge angle providing the brace for the finishing push. This is before the upper body launch.

(this is the next frame)

Can you see the torso leaning forward?

(this is 2 frames later)

Yikes! There's that wedge again.

(this is from the turn from 14-16 seconds)

In this animated sequence, you can clearly see the lateral lean to the inside as the cause of the skis getting ahead and the weight getting back. I left out a couple of frames between steps 3 and 4, but step 4 shows the wedge as the inevitable result again. The wedge provides the speed control to enable the weight re-centering of the upper body coming forward. From there you can finish the turn as Rick has described.

Here's what I want to see:
Parallel skis throughout the turn, simultaneous edge changes instead of sequential edge changes and inside leg collapse during turn initiation instead of upper body movement.

Here's how to do it:
Focus on learning new turn initiation movements in longer radius turns first before gradually tightening into shorter radius turns. With a longer radius turn, you will be able to perform a turn finish with the skis more across the hill or even with an uphill component to the finish. From this position you will be better able to perform a turn initiation move beginning with an extension of the uphill ankle. This will cause the hips to move diagonally forward into the new turn and simultaneously facilitate an inside leg collapse. (Note: The PMTS approach teaches to lift and tip the inside ski. Either focus can get to the same end result).

Exercises that can help:
Tracer turns, White Pass turns, Pivot slips, Skate move to start turns
Traverses where you raise the downhill ski slightly off the snow by only extending the uphill ankle (vs lifting the downhill leg)
Railroad track turns are a good test to see if you own the movements, but my opinion is that they don't give you as much direct negative feedback when you are not doing the movements (although the tracks can show you have not "got it", the turns can still feel pretty good).

Final note:
Although I've picked on three right turn finishes/left turn initiations, I can see the same problems to a lesser extent in your other turns. I'm not an alignment specialist, but your wedge stills just look odd to me. If I had spare money to bet, I'd say that your left boot could use some canting. Although a change in technique alone can greatly improve your performance, the root cause of your issues could be alignment. Have you had your alignment checked since your last boot purchase? If not, you may find it worthwhile to get checked before you try to change your skiing.
rusty thanks for the comments, you put into words what I feel when turning, great MA!. in regards to technique, I was playing around with that inner leg collapse today (long leg/short leg), patience turns (letting the skis 'hook up' higher in the turn so as to prevent the sudden pivot MSR was referring to) and doing everything with a medium-long radius. Additionally, a L3 watched me and suggested letting small movements grow into larger ones, i.e. not doing everyting so abruptly during transition.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by makwendo99 View Post
rusty, that 'wedge' seems more and more to be an alignment issue to me as well.
Mak,

The problem is that if bad alignment is giving you uneven ski performance, you have to learn uneven movements to make the skis work in synch. This is really hard to do. You're much more likely to adapt to the performance than be able to correct it.
post #11 of 21
The final sequence that you have shown, 14-16, in my limited opinion shows no turn taking place until the christy. He is balanced on his two feet and no turn is occuring so he does a christy to bring the turn around. It seems to me that he needs to get on the ski and pressure it. He needs to do this early in the turn so that it doesn't all come down to the end of the turn.

I bring this up more to further the discussion, since my MA qualifications are lacking.
post #12 of 21
Paul,

Part of this is the beauty of the animated gif and part is the danger. In the GIF you can see a slight direction change happen via pivoting and the end result. In the video this is hard to see with an untrained eye. The danger part is that between the video frames lost due to compression for the web and the selection process for the animated GIF, it's easy to forget that the wedge happens only very briefly at the end of the turn, well after the skis have been turned into and through the fall line. It would be clearer if I showed all the stills in the animation, but the process is tedious and time consuming.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Paul,

it's easy to forget that the wedge happens only very briefly at the end of the turn, well after the skis have been turned into and through the fall line. It would be clearer if I showed all the stills in the animation, but the process is tedious and time consuming.
I am not sure I understand your point. Since the wedge only happens briefly, does that mean that the earlier part of the turn is strong enough. The wedge to me would indicate crisis management. A reaction to not being on the turn earlier. I think(?), that he is riding the turn when he needs to be more active and firmly pressure the ski.
post #14 of 21
As he turns through the fall line, he is smearing his turn.

How can he improve his turn? He needs to be more vigilant through the fall line.

Watching the moving video I see the outside ski wavering, yet he's in good balance because of his weight distribution.

Big improvement, Mak has experienced a break through. Sounds like some good coaching.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
I am not sure I understand your point. Since the wedge only happens briefly, does that mean that the earlier part of the turn is strong enough. The wedge to me would indicate crisis management. A reaction to not being on the turn earlier. I think(?), that he is riding the turn when he needs to be more active and firmly pressure the ski.
My point was Mak is not making a christy since he is turning the skis through the fall line before the wedge appears. The wedge is not an intentional move to gain balance. It is a result of pressuring the tail of the outside ski too much at the end of the old turn followed by the new outside ski beginning the next turn before the inside ski is ready.
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
The wedge is not an intentional move to gain balance.

It is a result of pressuring the tail of the outside ski too much at the end of the old turn .
theRusty and Mak, this is more for discussion:

Whether you call it a wedge or just plain "bottoming out". The end of that turn is weak due to earlier part of the turn. There needs to be a smooth transition from the fall line to the end of the turn. Mak, has gotten to the end of the turn and is struggling to initiate the next turn.

Coming out of this turn and into the next, he is setting himself up to do the same thing over agiain. Mak, IMHO, would see a big improvement in his turn if he would engage the tips and pressure the ski.

On Epic, we have talked about "hanging in the fall line" longer. Facing the fear of the skis going straight down the fall line. This will improve his transition and prevent the little crisis at the end of the turn.

Yes, no, maybe???
post #17 of 21
Paul,

There is an exercise that I like for this called "10 toes" where you make sure that all 10 toes are pointing straight down the fall line before you turn out of it. Your recommendation for spending more time in the fall line is consistent with my recommendation for making larger radius turns. Your basic approach starts from the middle of the turn. Mine was to focus on turn completion to set up better initiation. There are many ways to skin a cat. Sometimes you need to try several before you find one that works for you. This is what pros do in person that we can't do online. However online posters can get nearly the same result by collecting different recommendations from other posters.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

BillA, are you working with him at all? The turn shape has smoothed out some, and the pivot entry and body english has been tempered a bit. You have anything to do with it?
No, I was just the videographer. I think most of what is posted was the from the second run after we had viewed the first run on the ride back up the hill. We discussed what we both saw a bit and I made some suggestions but I don't remember what they were, maybe Mak remembers.
We had a CSIA L4 from Whistler on staff for part of the season and he spent some time working with Mak. Mak is a good skier on his way to being a great skier.
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Just an update on the 'wedge' rusty discovered.

Conditions were more hardpack than spring, perfect for some analysis. I went out with a psia L3 and he had me ski a flat traverse on first my left and then my right foot, first on the inside and than the outside edge. We chose some groomed courduroy so we could see tracks.

Left was fine, 1 single edge line for each edge.

My right is the problem.
He had me ski only the right ski inside edge and the track came out as if the ski was flat. Further trying to make the ski flat on the same run and a single edge line was drawn. It turns out the ski is undercanted (with the cant strips I mentioned earlier). The season is just about over here so unfortunately no video to show any changes but I'll see next season....
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Also, an update on technique. A few higher ups skiing with me suggested skating movements transitioning into parallel and using a long leg/ short leg alongside. The hop, I can feel is tamped down a LOT when I combine this with 10 toes rusty suggested and letting things build up as opposed to real quick movements which exaggerate any unwanted movements as well. I have lots of work on this but I think I just found the next seasons challenge. (this season was angulation and not inclination and I've got that almost sorted).
post #21 of 21
Mak,

Good for you! I'm going to go get checked for dyslexia and complain to the mail order outfit that gave me my boot fitter diploma. Can't wait to see next season's video.
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