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Dalbello Krypton Pro Issue

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Background: I'm having some fit/performance issues with these boots. I'm 5'6", weigh 145 lbs, level 8 skier that likes to ski bumps and steep fall line skiing using tight short radius turns. Recently bought a pair of RX8 skis which I love and decided to get some new boots since mine were 12 years old.

My feet are between 26.0 & 26.5, but I seem to be able to get into 25.5 boots fairly comfortably. I have between a C & D width and about average arch. Ended up with Dalbello Kryption Pro's in 25.5 with Intuition liners. I got the Superfeet Orange footbed since I was spending almost $600 on the boot and didn't want to spring for the Superfeet Kork.

After getting the Intuition liners custom molded to my feet I was having some ankle and heel hold down issues as well as sore shins. The ankle and heel hold down were solved with some extra pads in the heel, a little grinding of the shell around the ankles and a re-mold with the buckles a bit looser to allow for the liner to maintain a bit more volume in some areas and provide a more snug fit when buckled down. That seemed to work fairly well. However, I love to ski bumps and my shins just weren't happy.

My bootfitter who I think is pretty accomplished and I like a lot had explained that shin bang mainly occurs when there is a gap between your shin and the boot tongue and then you flex forward and bang your shin into the tongue. That sounds reasonable to me, but I have no gap and am still getting sore shins. Also to be quite honest, in the four days that I skied this boot, I wasn't even skiing that hard in the bumps - that makes me even more worried.

My hunch is that the Intuition ID liner just is too dense to offer my shins the padding they need to withstand bump skiing. During my second molding of the liners one area in the left liner broke down a bit and I'm going to have to get them replaced by Dalbello.

Now I'm wondering if I should ask Dalbello to just provide me with the regular boot liners, not the Intuition ID custom moldable liners? My bootfitter skis the same boot and he started with the regular liner and then upgraded to the Intuition. He was good enough to let me use his regular 26.5 liners from his Krypton Pros in my 25.5 boots. My bootfitter says that in the past he commonly skied a larger liner in a smaller boot shell to help avoid the liner sliding around. In the store they feel really good and I think my shins will be happier. However, I do notice a pressure point on the top of each of my feet right about where the tongue is fastened on to the rest of the liner. He heated up the plastic layer on the outside of the tongue and it helped a bit, but the pressure points are still very noticeable. I'll know this weekend how bad they are when I actually ski.

I believe my next move after skiing the boot with the regular liner will be to decide on whether to get the 25.5 liner to match my 25.5 shell or whether to get a larger 26.5 liner.

Questions:
1. Is my shin problem being caused by the dense Intuition liner?
2. Would I be better off with the regular liner with a more padded tongue?
3. Are there any issues in changing to the regular Krypton Pro liner?
4. Assuming these will feel better on my shins than the Intuition liner which I believe it will, should I be getting the 25.5 liner to match my 25.5 shell or a 26.5 liner?
5. Could the larger 26.5 liner be what is causing the pressure points on the top of my feet where the tonge meets the rest of the liner?
6. Would getting the Superfeet Kork footbeds help to alleviate the pressure point on top of my feet and/or just make my feet much more comfortable vs. the Superfeet Orange footbed that I already have.

Thanks for any advice. I'm frustrated at this point and I can't wait to be skiing with some comfortable feet!

Bob
post #2 of 29
I will reply tonight when I have more time.
post #3 of 29
What about putting an InstaPrint tongue on the liner tongue. It would take up any room that may currently exist between your shin and the boot tongue. I acknowledge that your boot fitter said that there was really no noticeable room alresdy. The InstaPrint Tongue will also provide additional heel hold down. If you go with teh InstaPrint tongue, I'd use the liner that is sized for the shell , I think the larer liner is causing the pressure point you described.

Consider the source here, I'm not qualified to suggest anything. However, I have used the InstaPrint tongues and they did result in a very snug and comfortable cuff fit with the residual benefit excellent heel hold down and elimination of any slop in the fit in the back of the boot.

Are your calves thin?
post #4 of 29
Booster strap?
post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post

Questions:
1. Is my shin problem being caused by the dense Intuition liner?
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
Alignment might be a problem too.
2. Would I be better off with the regular liner with a more padded tongue?
I personally prefer the ID liner over the stock liner. Do you have the gold or silver liners? And I ski these in the bumps without any shin pain. BTW, which tongues are you using? the grey or black ones?
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
3. Are there any issues in changing to the regular Krypton Pro liner?
No, other than weight and warmth.
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
4. Assuming these will feel better on my shins than the Intuition liner which I believe it will, should I be getting the 25.5 liner to match my 25.5 shell or a 26.5 liner?
I would stay with the 25.5 liner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
5. Could the larger 26.5 liner be what is causing the pressure points on the top of my feet where the tongue meets the rest of the liner?
Probably.
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
6. Would getting the Superfeet Kork footbeds help to alleviate the pressure point on top of my feet and/or just make my feet much more comfortable vs. the Superfeet Orange footbed that I already have.
How thick are the beds? You could shave some off of the bottoms. But I think the 26 liner in the smaller shell could be causing the tongue issues.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

Krypton Pro Issue

Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post
What about putting an InstaPrint tongue on the liner tongue. It would take up any room that may currently exist between your shin and the boot tongue. I acknowledge that your boot fitter said that there was really no noticeable room alresdy. The InstaPrint Tongue will also provide additional heel hold down. If you go with teh InstaPrint tongue, I'd use the liner that is sized for the shell , I think the larer liner is causing the pressure point you described.

Consider the source here, I'm not qualified to suggest anything. However, I have used the InstaPrint tongues and they did result in a very snug and comfortable cuff fit with the residual benefit excellent heel hold down and elimination of any slop in the fit in the back of the boot.

Are your calves thin?
I don't know anything about an Instaprint tongue - not sure if my boot fitter does either? What are they? I have the gold Intuition liner. I will say that I was having some heel hold down issues and my bootfitter cut pads that mimic the black areas around the heel of the liner and attached them before my second molding and that held my heel down much better. Does that sound like the right remedy?

How is the Instaprint tongue added to the liner and what is it's main purpose?

I really can't see/feel any extra room in the shin area with the Intuition liners. They appear to be very snug. I would say that my calves are pretty thin. Maybe my shins are just more sensitive or maybe they just need to get used to the boot? I've only skied them 4 days - am I giving up too soon?

Thanks for any input!
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 

Krypton Pro Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I personally prefer the ID liner over the stock liner. Do you have the gold or silver liners? And I ski these in the bumps without any shin pain. BTW, which tongues are you using? the grey or black ones?
No, other than weight and warmth.
I would stay with the 25.5 liner.
Probably.
How thick are the beds? You could shave some off of the bottoms. But I think the 26 liner in the smaller shell could be causing the tongue issues.
My boot came with the gold Intuition liner. The regular Krypton Pro liner that my bootfitter lent me has a black tongue - is that what you are asking? While my calves are on the smaller side, I really don't think that I have any extra room or play in that area of the liner/boot.

Sounds like if I decide to revert to the regular Krypton Pro liner then I should get the 25.5 to match my 25.5 shell.

The orange superfeet footbed is pretty thin and I don't know how easily it could be shaved? It does have some harder plastic on the bottom, but I guess I'd be skiing the 25.5 regular liner before I'd be shaving the footbed to make the regular 26.5 liner feel better.

Do you hear of people getting shin bang because of the denser material in the Intuition gold liner or am I an unusual case? Could it just be that my shins are more sensitive or that I haven't gotten used to the feel of the new Intuition liner? Maybe I should just go out and ski bumps hard and see what happens? I just didn't want a really bad case of bruised shins that could take weeks to heal - that happened once to me while skiing in bumps using some old Salomon SX91 Equipes years ago and it was really painful.

Would a remold without tightening the powerstrap be helpful? I was thinking that it might allow the tonge area of the Intuition liner to be a little thicker?

What do you think about the Instaprint tongue idea or the booster strap? I thought the straps on the Krypton Pro were pretty beefy as is?

Thanks in advance for your input.
post #8 of 29
agingbumpfan - As I read through your post I found myself really wondering what part of the country you're in and where you bought your Kryptons. Honestly, it sounds more like the shop where you got them did a poor job of fitting you to the boots. Please describe the process they used to fit you to your Kryptons and prepare the ID liners. There's definitely something up here - if they were telling you to crank down your buckles while fitting your ID liners then they're clueless.

Density of the liner shouldn't be responsible for shin bang. What your shop said is generally true - shin bang usually occurs when your shin isn't staying in contact with the front of the boot while skiing. It's tough to really assess this in a shop since you're not duplicating skiing forces there. You may think the fit is good across the top of the boot, but in reality it's not. As mentioned, a Booster strap is a great solution for this problem.

roundturns - I don't believe that Instaprint tongues are the solution, nor would they work well with ID liners. They're really a fix for use with more traditional "tongued" liners.
post #9 of 29
I also think you should try the grey tongue too. A agree w/ Noodler on the molding process. He is right that it might have been could have been done wrong. Did they use and oven or a glorified heat gun out of a red box? Like Noodler said too, they buckles should have been done loose too.
post #10 of 29
If you buckle down an Intuition too much while molding shin bing is a common result. I have faced this already when I tried to compress them while molding to have them harder. The only place where you could go in position 2 of 4 (assuming a 3 buckle boot with 4 positions) would be the lower 2 buckles, never the upper one(s). - A quick cure is to slowly heat just the shin area with a heatgun so that it expands a bit whitout your foot inside. Only get in after the boot has cooled down.
Therefore let another shop just do a remold. Then only buckle in the first position, no more!
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver View Post
Then only buckle in the first position, no more!
Clarification here, first buckle you get a bit of tension. I have a very narrow leg, if I clasp on the first buckle, I will have an inch of gap and there will be no form in the liner. The buckle method can vary with the type of foot and leg.
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
agingbumpfan - As I read through your post I found myself really wondering what part of the country you're in and where you bought your Kryptons. Honestly, it sounds more like the shop where you got them did a poor job of fitting you to the boots. Please describe the process they used to fit you to your Kryptons and prepare the ID liners. There's definitely something up here - if they were telling you to crank down your buckles while fitting your ID liners then they're clueless.

Density of the liner shouldn't be responsible for shin bang. What your shop said is generally true - shin bang usually occurs when your shin isn't staying in contact with the front of the boot while skiing. It's tough to really assess this in a shop since you're not duplicating skiing forces there. You may think the fit is good across the top of the boot, but in reality it's not. As mentioned, a Booster strap is a great solution for this problem.

roundturns - I don't believe that Instaprint tongues are the solution, nor would they work well with ID liners. They're really a fix for use with more traditional "tongued" liners.
I'm in Portland, OR and got the boots at Hillcrest Ski. I went to all of the ski shops in the Portland area and he seemed the most knowledgeable. I really think my boot fitter is pretty good, but I have to admit that the first molding left me with way too much room.

Here was the process. He cut the orange Superfeet footbed to the size of the Krypton footbed. He then put the footbed on my foot, put two toecaps around the front of my foot (over the footbed) and then secured everything with a sock.

The entire boot was heating for about 15 minutes on a blower machine (not the red one that you just stick in the boot while the boot is sitting upright, but one with a box and timer and the boot fits horizontally on the blower - I don't remember the color).

He did buckle the boot down pretty tight and that was an initial problem (I didnt' know it at the time). I stayed in it for about 20 minutes and then got out and let my foot and boot breath for another 10 minutes and then got in. It felt a lot looser than I was expecting and the heel hold down wasn't great.

I skied it and had some inside ankle problems on both feet that left me pretty bruised on the inside ankle bones. I also had some shin discomfort, but was focusing more on the painful ankles. He did a little grinding and then put some heel hold down pads in (kind of an L shape below my ankle bone). I skied it and the ankles felt better, but the heel was hurting from the pads. I had to take them out. I still had some shin discomfort, but again it wasn't the focus for me at the time.

He then cut new heel pads that mimic the black area on the back heel of the Intuition liner. It held me down much better without feeling painful. He then suggested that we could remold the boot again with the buckles looser to let the liner take up more room. I thought that sounded like a good idea so we did using only one toecap (rather than two) and the fit was much better everywhere. He did leave the pads on the back of the heels during the second remold - not sure if that was a good idea or not?

I skied them again with much better results. Without ankle pain and heel hold down issues it gave me time to focus on the shins. I didn't ski much on bumps that day as I was with my young son on easier slopes most of the day, but did get a run or two in. Still had some discomfort in the shins.

It was more my idea to swap for the regular Krypton Pro liner and the padding in the heel area of the regular liner was holding me down very well - it just felt comfortable. I'm frustrated, but I'm thinking now that I shouldn't be giving up this quickly. I think the Booster strap sounds like a great idea. From what I read about it last night I would just be removing the screw that holds the Dalbello velcro strap, taking off the stock strap and replacing with the Booster strap - correct? Is there anything else that I should be aware of?

I also think I should bite the bullet and get a custom footbed made. I was reading that it would be more comfortable and supportive overall as well as helping to correct any alignment issues and that it might even help out with shin issues. I was thinking the Superfeet Kork where they put the bag around your foot and suck out any air, etc. Any thoughts/recommendations?

Also I did some reading on shin bang last night and am starting to wonder if I'm really dealing with shin bang or actually "shin bite". I absolutely had shin bang years ago in an old SX91 Equipe. It was very tender to the touch and I couldn't even flex my boot. What I'm experiencing now is different - more of a reddening of the lower shin area and it's more of an irritation. I read that shin bite could be from rubbing of the sock and/or your skin when flexing forward. Could this really be my shin problem? Any suggestions on how to address that? I imagine that the Booster strap would help that too?

I'm going to go to the shop today and get my Intuition liners back. They were holding them because in the second molding process I got some break down of the liner in one small area and they were going to be replaced under warranty. I'll try to locate a Booster Strap locally and get a footbed made. Then I can ski my original Intuition liners.

If that helps then I'll stick with the Intuition liner, have mine replaced and on the first mold of the replacement liner make sure that the buckles are loose. Should I just keep the Booster strap undone for the mold? Also I'd like to believe that I really don't need the extra heel hold down pads and that with the buckles loose that will allow the liner to expand more around my heel. What do you guys think?

Am I missing anything?
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I also think you should try the grey tongue too. A agree w/ Noodler on the molding process. He is right that it might have been could have been done wrong. Did they use and oven or a glorified heat gun out of a red box? Like Noodler said too, they buckles should have been done loose too.
I'm using the softer grey tongue on the Kryptons right now. The black one was on the boot originally, but it felt so stiff in the shop that I changed to the grey immediately.

See my other description regarding the molding process. The buckles were definitely too tight on the first mold. On the second mold the buckles and strap were looser, but he did keep the heel hold down pads on during the mold - was that correct?
post #14 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver View Post
If you buckle down an Intuition too much while molding shin bing is a common result. I have faced this already when I tried to compress them while molding to have them harder. The only place where you could go in position 2 of 4 (assuming a 3 buckle boot with 4 positions) would be the lower 2 buckles, never the upper one(s). - A quick cure is to slowly heat just the shin area with a heatgun so that it expands a bit whitout your foot inside. Only get in after the boot has cooled down.
Therefore let another shop just do a remold. Then only buckle in the first position, no more!
I want to make sure I understand your recommendation. Are you suggesting a remold with just the two bottom buckles done loosely and leave the upper buckle undone along with the Booster Strap/velcro undone?
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
agingbumpfan - As I read through your post I found myself really wondering what part of the country you're in and where you bought your Kryptons. Honestly, it sounds more like the shop where you got them did a poor job of fitting you to the boots. Please describe the process they used to fit you to your Kryptons and prepare the ID liners. There's definitely something up here - if they were telling you to crank down your buckles while fitting your ID liners then they're clueless.

Density of the liner shouldn't be responsible for shin bang. What your shop said is generally true - shin bang usually occurs when your shin isn't staying in contact with the front of the boot while skiing. It's tough to really assess this in a shop since you're not duplicating skiing forces there. You may think the fit is good across the top of the boot, but in reality it's not. As mentioned, a Booster strap is a great solution for this problem.

roundturns - I don't believe that Instaprint tongues are the solution, nor would they work well with ID liners. They're really a fix for use with more traditional "tongued" liners.
Should the Booster Strap go over both the softer grey plastic tongue and the Intuition liner or in between the grey plastic tongue and the liner?
post #16 of 29
From what I've had from snowboard hardboots and intuition - I'ld buckle into the loosest position. Never rebuckle when it gets looser during molding, also wear very thin socks!!!!!! Oh and don't moove. Just stand with the front of the boot elevated. Do one boot after the other but place something like a thick book under your other foot so you stand evenly.
A good description how to properly mold (its more for the old intuitions but will give you an idea on mistakes not to do) them can be found in the bootfitting section of www.alpinecarving.com
And yes - I recommend a remold. I wouldn't tighten the booster strap for molding
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by agingbumpfan View Post
Also I did some reading on shin bang last night and am starting to wonder if I'm really dealing with shin bang or actually "shin bite". I absolutely had shin bang years ago in an old SX91 Equipe. It was very tender to the touch and I couldn't even flex my boot. What I'm experiencing now is different - more of a reddening of the lower shin area and it's more of an irritation. I read that shin bite could be from rubbing of the sock and/or your skin when flexing forward. Could this really be my shin problem? Any suggestions on how to address that? I imagine that the Booster strap would help that too?
Is it the bottom on your shin where it meets the top of your foot? This probably isn’t shin-bang and is your transcural ligament running up the front of your leg. It is an easy place to inflame as it’s where the tongue connects to the foot of the boot (in most boots, don’t know if it is like that in Kryptons) and that can make a pressure point. Not a happy ankle when this happens!
post #18 of 29
agingbumpfan - thanks for your response (nice long post). It sounds like your fitter started off well (footbed, toe caps, hot blowers, etc.), but when you had problems due to him cranking down your buckles he decided to grab from his standard bag of tricks (adhesive pads) and that's where IMO he really went wrong. In my experience full thermo-forming liners like the Intuitions and ID liners (although they're not quite as full forming without the full bake) should not have fit problems addressed with pads - these should be absolutely unnecessary if you have a good shell fit and understand how to properly fit the liner to the foot.

My recommendation is to get your ID liners back and find another shop. Before committing to using them though, chat with the guy that's going to do your fitting and feel him out about the buckle pressure he recommends to form the liner. Also see if he uses these important points - It's important to raise the toes of the boot and apply some forward pressure while driving your heel backward as your liner cools, BUT DON'T MOVE AROUND - DON'T CONTINUALLY FLEX FORWARD AND REPEAT. All that movement will only reduce the heel hold down power of the ID liner. Your objective is to create a tight, deep, well-formed heel pocket as the liner is cooling - the onus is really on you to get this right since it's your feet in the boots. I also recommend doing the boots one-at-a-time so that you can concentrate on one boot only.

As for the Booster strap - yes, replace the stock strap with the Booster and place it OVER the floating tongue. It has been confirmed that the Booster works best with Flexon/Krypton designs when placed over the tongue. For traditional 2-piece overlap boots it works best under the tongue directly around the liner (which has a tongue).

Good luck.
post #19 of 29
change to the softer grey tongue. i was getting shin bang with the krypton pro as well but never had a prob with any of my previous boots (salomon xwave, lange comp100). I ended up returning the boots in the end because it they are also a little too wide fit as well.
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
agingbumpfan - thanks for your response (nice long post). It sounds like your fitter started off well (footbed, toe caps, hot blowers, etc.), but when you had problems due to him cranking down your buckles he decided to grab from his standard bag of tricks (adhesive pads) and that's where IMO he really went wrong. In my experience full thermo-forming liners like the Intuitions and ID liners (although they're not quite as full forming without the full bake) should not have fit problems addressed with pads - these should be absolutely unnecessary if you have a good shell fit and understand how to properly fit the liner to the foot.

My recommendation is to get your ID liners back and find another shop. Before committing to using them though, chat with the guy that's going to do your fitting and feel him out about the buckle pressure he recommends to form the liner. Also see if he uses these important points - It's important to raise the toes of the boot and apply some forward pressure while driving your heel backward as your liner cools, BUT DON'T MOVE AROUND - DON'T CONTINUALLY FLEX FORWARD AND REPEAT. All that movement will only reduce the heel hold down power of the ID liner. Your objective is to create a tight, deep, well-formed heel pocket as the liner is cooling - the onus is really on you to get this right since it's your feet in the boots. I also recommend doing the boots one-at-a-time so that you can concentrate on one boot only.

As for the Booster strap - yes, replace the stock strap with the Booster and place it OVER the floating tongue. It has been confirmed that the Booster works best with Flexon/Krypton designs when placed over the tongue. For traditional 2-piece overlap boots it works best under the tongue directly around the liner (which has a tongue).

Good luck.
I forgot to mention that the bootfitter did have my toes elevated using a 2"x2" piece of wood and I initially did a few flexes to get the heel back and then remained still.

I got a Superfeet Kork footbed made today and it feels really good - at least in the shop. I'm also going to order a Booster Strap online - the shop only had the racing (3 layer) model which seemed to stiff for me at 145 lbs. I believe that I need the "Standard" model with two bands - Does that sound right?

I'm hoping that this combination of the custom footbed and Booster Strap along with making sure that my upper buckle and Booster Strap are very tight will do the trick. I'll remold in the near future with ultra thin socks & loose buckles to make sure that it's not packing down too much.

Let me know if I'm missing anything. Thanks!
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard View Post
change to the softer grey tongue. i was getting shin bang with the krypton pro as well but never had a prob with any of my previous boots (salomon xwave, lange comp100). I ended up returning the boots in the end because it they are also a little too wide fit as well.
I am using the softer grey tongue and never used the black one - seemed to stiff for me even in a 70 degree shop so I imagine it will be way to stiff on the slopes. I misunderstood an earlier related question in this thread.
post #22 of 29
Did the sho work with any shell alignment? It could be that the shell is not aligned with your leg, that also would cause shin pain. At this point, how raw is your shin? I agree with the suggestions so and start with remolding the liners...correctly. Start back at square one. Set an appointment with their top guy and bring a print out of this thread (or talk to him first and direct him to the site so he can read it). I hate to say this too, maybe the Krypton is not the boot for your foot.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Did the sho work with any shell alignment? It could be that the shell is not aligned with your leg, that also would cause shin pain. At this point, how raw is your shin? I agree with the suggestions so and start with remolding the liners...correctly. Start back at square one. Set an appointment with their top guy and bring a print out of this thread (or talk to him first and direct him to the site so he can read it). I hate to say this too, maybe the Krypton is not the boot for your foot.
They checked whether I needed canting with some tools and both legs looked fine. Is there another type of alignment that they should be doing?

My shins feel pretty good at this point so I think skiing them wil be a pretty fair test. I even shaved most of the hair off of my shin area to make sure that the hair being pulled wasn't the problem.

Unfortunately there was a small area in my left Intuition liner that broke down a bit (I'd describe it as bubbling) on the second molding. My fitter says that it's under warranty for a year and we can have them replaced, but that means skiing these as is for the rest of the season and then sending them back to Dalbello for the replacement. If I feel good about everything over the rest of the season with the new custom footbed and booster strap then I order the replacement Intuition liner and remold with a single toe cap, new footbed and loose buckles. If I don't feel good about the liner over the rest of the season then I think my only other option is to replace the defective Intuition liner with the stock krypton Pro liner in a 25.5 to match my shell and give that a go next season.

If I end up with the stock liner (which I hope I won't) and I actually can't get a good fit with it then I'm not sure what my options are? What does a ski shop typically do when fit is guaranteed, but they can't seem to make your feet happy - store credit to try another boot?

My foot is a little smaller than a D in width. My heel is a bit smaller than normal as well as the area just above the heel and calf. Is there anything specifically that I've said that would lead you to believe that the Krypton's won't work so I know what areas I might need to work on?

I really do like the design/functions of the boot. The progressive and even flex is really great and I believe I can get a great fit around the foot and ankle. It's the shins that I'm mainly worried about.
post #24 of 29
How exactly did they heat up the liner?
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
How exactly did they heat up the liner?
Here was the process. He cut the orange Superfeet footbed to the size of the Krypton footbed. He then put the footbed on my foot, put two toecaps around the front of my foot (over the footbed) and then secured everything with a sock.

The entire boot was heating for about 15 minutes on a blue Dalbello blower machine (not the red one that you just stick in the boot while the boot is sitting upright, but one with a box and timer and the boot fits horizontally on the blower).

He did buckle the boot down pretty tight and that was an initial problem (I didnt' know it at the time). I stayed in it for about 20 minutes and then got out and let my foot and boot breath for another 10 minutes and then got in. It felt a lot looser than I was expecting and the heel hold down wasn't great.

I skied it and had some inside ankle problems on both feet that left me pretty bruised on the inside ankle bones. I also had some shin discomfort, but was focusing more on the painful ankles. He did a little grinding and then put some heel hold down pads in (kind of an L shape below my ankle bone). I skied it and the ankles felt better, but the heel was hurting from the pads. I had to take them out. I still had some shin discomfort, but again it wasn't the focus for me at the time.

He then cut new heel pads that mimic the black area on the back heel of the Intuition liner. It held me down much better without feeling painful. He then suggested that we could remold the boot again with the buckles looser to let the liner take up more room. I thought that sounded like a good idea so we did using only one toecap (rather than two) and the fit was much better everywhere. He did leave the pads on the back of the heels during the second remold - not sure if that was a good idea or not?

Like I said, there was a small area that had some bubbling inside the liner on the second mold so it appears that I'll get them replaced under warranty, but that most likely won't happen till end of season as I don't want to be out a boot for a few weeks.
post #26 of 29
Before you spend alot of time making the boot "that sounds like it will never fit right" fit.I skied about 100 days in last yrs boot of which maybe 10 felt good.I went through 5 liners including intuition,zipfit,and 3 stock liners and at least 25 trips to bootfitter and finally this January i went"on my boot fitters advice"down the street and tried some Nordica speed machine 14's.I have skied about 30-35 days in them and been to shop only 2 times.
PS
I loved the way they skied when they felt good.
post #27 of 29
skidbump has a good point. You really need to keep your options wide open when choosing ski boots. Find a fitter you trust, let them assess your feet and legs, and then listen to which boots he/she feels will work best for you. Too many times skiers walk into a store with a preconceived notion of what boot they want without really understanding that the fit is the highest priority - not just a "lack of pain" fit, but a good fit that equally holds your foot and leg to provide proper skiing support.

agingbumpfan - your description of your foot sounds more like a Salomon Falcon 10 to me, than a Flexon/Krypton foot. A D width foot can be made to fit into the Flexon/Krypton, but it's not ideal. I have a B/C width foot with a very narrow heel and Achilles area. That's really the foot that works the best with these shells. A narrower foot probably needs to go the semi-plug or plug race boot route and a wider foot has many other options.

BTW - the double toe caps was a major mistake too. I can't understand why anyone would do an initial setup with double toe caps. Very odd - I'm not feeling very "warm-n-fuzzy" about this guy you've been using.
post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
skidbump has a good point. You really need to keep your options wide open when choosing ski boots. Find a fitter you trust, let them assess your feet and legs, and then listen to which boots he/she feels will work best for you. Too many times skiers walk into a store with a preconceived notion of what boot they want without really understanding that the fit is the highest priority - not just a "lack of pain" fit, but a good fit that equally holds your foot and leg to provide proper skiing support.

agingbumpfan - your description of your foot sounds more like a Salomon Falcon 10 to me, than a Flexon/Krypton foot. A D width foot can be made to fit into the Flexon/Krypton, but it's not ideal. I have a B/C width foot with a very narrow heel and Achilles area. That's really the foot that works the best with these shells. A narrower foot probably needs to go the semi-plug or plug race boot route and a wider foot has many other options.

BTW - the double toe caps was a major mistake too. I can't understand why anyone would do an initial setup with double toe caps. Very odd - I'm not feeling very "warm-n-fuzzy" about this guy you've been using.
My foot width is between and C&D. I do also have a narrow heel and achilles area. I wasn't looking for the Dalbello at all. I tried the Falcon 10 and it didn't feel good - I don't remember why. I had narrowed down to a Nordica Speedmachine 12 and Head RS90 - both felt pretty good. Then my existing boot fitter recommended the Krypton Pro. He showed me his foot and it looked almost exactly like mine, but a little larger. He's in a 26.5 Krypton Pro. The story about molding perfectly to your foot like a glove sounded good to me & I liked the way it flexed. The Krypton Pro was a lot more than the other two boots and more than I originally wanted to spend, but I decided to splurge for the idea of a custom molded boot.

I guess I'll know more after I ski them again tomorrow.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Boots feeling a bit better

I skied the boots pretty hard on Saturday. The felt quite a bit better. I think the custom footbed helped and I made sure to keep the top buckle and velcro strap pretty tight. In fact I had to unbuckle in the lift lines to ease the pressure a bit.

I hope they'll only get better from this point. I'll have the Booster Strap on before next weekend. I'm also going to try some socks with a bit more padding in the shin area to see if that helps. I believe that the mold on my new Intuition liner at the end of the season will be the key to success here, but I'll need to wait a bit for that.

Thanks to everyone for your advice. I'm very hopeful that I'm going to love these boots!
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