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Constructive Criticism Requested...

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
This is a video of me skiing.. I would have posted it in the sticky, but I was hoping for some criticism and advice to improve my skiing... I watched the video right after It was taken, and realized I was not keeping my torso vertical enough, and worked on that for a few hours... It seemed to help a lot and I felt a lot more stable and felt like I had much better edge hold...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNZMH7eqVDI

Tear it apart...
post #2 of 15
You forgot your poles! I'll just touch on a few issues. Try to stay flexed/retacted into your transition. That way at transition you will have a 50/50 ski pressure. This will also help you be more progressive with your movements. Work on lighting the inside foot as you start your turn. This help you get more Vertical Seperation. I know the hill was flat but rounding and riding your turns will help. Good skiing overall IMO.
post #3 of 15
You're turning exactly how I used to turn until someone told me the following

you can incline a lot (whole body leans in) and turn

or

you can incline a bit but angulate the lower body more and turn....

the latter is promoting upper/lower body separation and will work to rid you of that 'up' motion during your transition when you release your edges at the end of a turn. Get a hold of your poles as well, you need them for timing, stance and to aid CM movement
Your stance looks to be a a wee off center (fore/aft), center your body, get a feeling for where it should naturally be centered by doing a static jump on flat terrain and seeing where you land ...note your feet and hip position, they'll probably land in your personal balanced stance (although I tell you this at the risk of you jumping the wrong way and landing with your CM back). A couple of drills might also help you through this

-Proper wedge turns blended into medium/short radius turns
-Proper wedge christys
-hockey stops in both directions (they're lovely for your short radius turns IF done correctly and many many times). Try to find some examiner demos online for the right way (most people don't get their CM where it should be in a hockey stop)
-1000 steps
Start here, keep a centered stance at ALL times, and build from there. You have the basic idea but some bad habits (mainly banking/inclination only turns) that can be unlearned with some practice...

work on your short/ medium radius turns, they're slower and more deliberate than higher speed GS turns. Your technique flaws will come through better at slower speeds and help you to Identify what else you need to work on. This radius is also more vesatile on steeper terrain for speed control.


cheers
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I realized I was inclining my whole body and worked on angulating more the rest of the day.. felt a lot better, but like you said.. it's a bad habit I will have to break which may take some time... When I was working on it, the main difference is it felt like I was using my obliques to get the angulation... like I was doing a 'Side crunch'... is that how it should feel?

As for my stance... a little bit in the back seat?
post #5 of 15
Not bad at all. Good rhythm and some nice turn archs. Bad stuff, banking turning left. Maybe the slope is at a pich or that you are skiing across the slope. Arms dangling and looking a bit off but that has probably much to do with banking while turning left. Also, you look a bit too passive. Work harder in order to make it look easier and more fluent. Now you have a tendency to park and ride.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Good stuff.... Anything else guys?

I'll be working on some of this stuff and hopefully over the rest of the season I will try to get out of any bad habits... Once I get some practice with more angulation, I will try to get some more video.. Maybe this weekend or next weekend...

Oh, and about poles... You know, I know they are helpful, I know that I would benefit from them... What I don't know is.. well, how to use them. If I have a chance I will try to clinic with someone one day later in the season to help me with poles....

I'll work on the upper/lower body seperation stuff and once I am more comfortable with it, I will learn to use poles... I don't want too much to have to think about at once...
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrogen_wv View Post
Good stuff.... Anything else guys?

I'll be working on some of this stuff and hopefully over the rest of the season I will try to get out of any bad habits... Once I get some practice with more angulation, I will try to get some more video.. Maybe this weekend or next weekend...

Oh, and about poles... You know, I know they are helpful, I know that I would benefit from them... What I don't know is.. well, how to use them. If I have a chance I will try to clinic with someone one day later in the season to help me with poles....

I'll work on the upper/lower body seperation stuff and once I am more comfortable with it, I will learn to use poles... I don't want too much to have to think about at once...
For the kind of skiing you do you dont need to use your poles at all. Simply hold them out to your side much like your hands are in the video, slightly forward though. Get Harald Harbs new book and DVD.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yeah.. I have an issue with letting my arms flail a little... Maybe I could clasp them together in front of me??

That would keep me forward, and (may) improve my balance as I won't be compensating with my hands...?

What makes poles unneccessary for the kind of skiing I'm doing as compared to 'other' kinds of skiing... not exactly following you..
post #9 of 15
It does take some humility to post a vid of your skiing for pointers.

You have nice flow and rhythm.

I won't go past where I think that you need to work. What I see is that your primary turning mechanism is upper body rotation followed by banking, or a weight transfer to the outside ski.

What you need to do is think about replacing rotation with independent leg movements. A movement forward in the hips by opening the knees to more vertical femurs followed by a lightening/tipping of the inside ski and guiding of both feet into the new turn.

The other extraneous movements that are happening should disappear on their own with good turning skills.
post #10 of 15
Hydrogen,

My vote is with Pierre. You have good rhythm and turn shape. You are making simultaneous edge changes and there's not a lot of excessive upper body movements to maintain balance.

One way to get a feel for the "forward hip movement" is to stand on tip toe with one foot but move your hip foreward as you raise your heel. You'll notice that the hip movement is both forward and diagonally to the side of the still flat foot. If you do this while you let your other leg collapse, the feeling will be even more pronounced. This is another aspect of the "independent" leg movement Pierre refers to. If you finish your turns more across the hill it will make it easier to incorporate this move into your skiing. If you add this to your skiing you will be able to get on higher edge angles in your turns and get on edge earlier in your turns to help make rounder and more powerful turns.

Poles can also help develop this move if you use the pole swing as a mental cue for when to move your hips into the turn and the direction to move them. Another area where poles can help is to help keep the elbows in front of the hip. Your elbows are generally at your sides and occasionally fall back behind. Getting your weight a tiny bit more forward this way will add pressure to the ski tips to make them more responsive.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'll have to try a few of these things next time I'm out... Later in the evening when I was focusing on a more vertical upper body and more angulation, I felt like I kept better forward balance...

I'm at work now, so I'll look like an idiot if I start standing on tip toes and whatever in the middle of the office. I'll try out some of those things you guys mentioned as soon as I have a chance.

Pierre - I actually got positive feedback, which was more than I expected after watching those videos of me.. I was expecting "Well, at least you didn't fall"

I love putting myself up for criticism... Without any criticism and advice, I would not progress as much as possible, and while I know I'm not the best, I know I'm not the worst either... And for only being skiing for 2 seasons I personally feel very good about my level of skiing. I do ski pretty frequently, but most of it is teaching people how to snowplow. I don't get a whole lot of time to really focus on progressing, although I feel that the better my basic skills get, the better my overall skiing gets.
post #12 of 15
H_wv,

Given that you're not using poles, you could play with an outside boot touch drill: as you transition, reach down and touch the top of the new outside boot. Hold that through the belly of the turn, then change. As you do this, don't bend forward to do it, but rather outward towards the side of the boot.

I think you're probably getting the feel of this already anyway, but that could be a useful drill for you.

I would also suggest that you spend some time playing with RR tracks on very gentle terrain. Tip the bottom of your feet just a little, and tip them back and forth like a pendulum, being progressive and not sudden with all of your movements. Get a feel for how the skis work when you do this. Make no movements other than tipping, and examine your tracks to make sure that they are clean lines without any smearing. You can then take those movements onto steeper terrain which will have you moving your body more inside the turn, but only doing so for balance, not as a contrived movement.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yeah.. I was feeling sort of what you were mentioning when I was getting more angulated.. I'll definitely do the boot touch drill, though... I love drills.. I remember when I first did 1000 steps, they were almost as fun as actually skiing

I get what you are talking about with the pendulum thing... If I do it properly and let it flow, I should be able to get up on the edges without skidding at all, is that the idea?

Oh, and another thing I noticed once I started angulating more was that I could ride the edges at lower speeds and gentler slopes, which I loved.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
One way to get a feel for the "forward hip movement" is to stand on tip toe with one foot but move your hip foreward as you raise your heel. You'll notice that the hip movement is both forward and diagonally to the side of the still flat foot. If you do this while you let your other leg collapse, the feeling will be even more pronounced.
While I generally agree with what therusty has said, I would caution you to recognize that this is a drill or exercise to get you to emphasize moving the hips forward and diagonally. Pressing on your toes or attempting to stand on tip-toe while in ski boots, however, can actually cause you to move back and lose the gentle shin contact you want with the front of your boots.

The idea of extending into the new turn is valid (standing on tip-toe is an extension move), but you don't want it to push you into the back seat.

Something that might also help with moving the knees and hips forward into the new turn, as well as lightening/tipping the new inside (old outside) ski is actually attempting to pick up the big toe of the new inside foot as you transition into the new turn. This increases ankle flex, pulls the shin forward against the front of the boot, and tips the foot toward the little toe edge, in the direction of the new turn. It's important to allow this movement to pull your knees and hips forward, rather than sitting back and picking up the front of the ski! Remember what Pierre said about getting your femurs a bit more vertical. This will help keep your hips over your feet, rather than behind them.

Lightening/tipping the new inside ski is often a flexion move which can complement the extension of the new outside leg. It's good to have both available, and you may find yourself using a blend of both, depending on the circumstances and the intent.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrogen_wv View Post
I get what you are talking about with the pendulum thing... If I do it properly and let it flow, I should be able to get up on the edges without skidding at all, is that the idea?
Yep, you betcha! But start with very low edge angles and very gentle terrain. It's amazing how impatient most of us get wanting the skis to turn. So we make them. It's a focus to only tip that will help with that.
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