EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › PSIA-E Level II Skiing Reference Maneuvers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

PSIA-E Level II Skiing Reference Maneuvers

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I recently took the Level II skiing practice exam. There were two examiners: One gave me a borderline pass; The other said that borderline skiing constitutes a fail.

My free runs were appropriately dynamic and demonstrated proper alignment and balance.

The tasks were skating down the fall line, RR tracks, Lane Change (five short, one medium, five short), Wedge Turns and Wedge Christies.

Passed on skating down the fall line, RR tracks and Lane Change.

Failed on Wedge and Wedge Christies - Damn!

The feedback on wedge was I need to transition my CoM to the inside ski during initiation. The gap between the snow and the ski needs to disappear.

The feedback on the wedge christies were similar but in addition I should allow the skis to slide in the turn to control speed.

In short, all the dynamic movements in the higher level skiing should be present in the lower level reference maneuvers.

I also recall reading in a thread here that during the lane change they were looking for a smooth transition between the last short and the medium radius turn as well as for a smooth transition from the medium radius turn back to short radius turns.

My question is what are the examiners looking for in each of the other specific the tasks? I am looking for short bullets for each of the reference maneuvers that we did not cover. I believe if I have a brief synopsis, I hope to be able to practice on my own.

I would normally ask my own trainers what the examiners are looking for but they have cancelled the training budget. The training director and I are looking to coordinate our schedules and it appears we will get some training time in.

These are the tasks I remain uncertain about.
Open Parallel turns
Stem Christies
Open Parallel
Spontaneous Christies
Stepping Maneuver
Short Radius Accellerating or decellerating - I think I got this from the yo-yo drills. I'd like some reinforcement/confirmation.

Any input would be appreciated. If you think this constitutes cheating, kill the thread... or flame away.

Thanks 'mates,
rob
post #2 of 16
the PSIA W maneuver's are here.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=24856

The write up there includes how the tasks are scored. (what's good, What's bad, etc) It might help with some of your questions. I'll read through your list again when I get a chance.

DC
post #3 of 16
Skiprob,
I’m not an examiner but I did take part 1 of the level II exam in December. I think that what the examiners are looking for in your skiing and demos are the patterns of effective modern skiing. If you have the Visual Cues to Effective Skiing (I think it is in the Alpine Exam Guide) you will have a good idea of what the examiners are looking for. Below is a brief synopsis of the exam.

Good Luck!

Level II Part 1 Day 1

Location: Hunter Mt, NY

Conditions: Spring like, except it’s supposed to be December. Slush bumps, ice, crud, whoo hoo

Format: Three parts, each part about three hours each part with a different examiner.

Tasks: Wedge, Wedge Christy, lane change-three short turns, one medium, three short, bumps-lead a group of level 4-6 students through the selected terrain, maintain consistent speed and control, short radius turns, medium radius turns, long turns-demonstrate basic open parallel technique, round turns with appropriate skill blending, skate down a slight incline-demonstrate edge to edge movements with minimal vertical or side to side movement (ski through a pipe),

Examiners: (day one) Bill Beerman, Kristi Robertson (Stowe), (day two) Ray Allard

Day 1

First part is with Bill Beerman from Stratton. He went out of his way to put all of us at ease, which was a good thing as we were all, very…….tense at the beginning of the exam. He explained the process, the tasks and how we should execute each task.
First run is a warm up run down Hellgate a nice bumped up black diamond, not what I want to warm up on but I did Ok with it, we ski it to the lift and go back up. Second run is down Belt Parkway and it’s looking more like a gobble stone road than a parkway today. First task is the lane change and Bill has a hard time finding someplace with enough snow to perform the task. Second task is medium radius turns and then we head up the lift and back to Hellgate to lead our class of level 4-7 through the bumps. The top of the run is really bumped up with nice big icy trenches. Did mention how much I suck in the big icy trenchy bumps of the east coast variety? No, anyway I managed to pull it off without looking too awful. We do the lane changes again where there’s a bit more room as well as some of the other tasks. The group is starting to relax and we’re all starting to have some fun with it. It’s a good group with some good strong skiers. A few more runs and it’s time for lunch.

Second part is with Kristi, very laid back and also goes out of her way to put us at ease. I get the distinct impression that even though there is no coaching the examiners are giving us a reasonable opportunity to pass. Kristi is not familiar with Hunter and had some difficulty deciding what terrain to use, not a bad thing; we all got in a little extra free skiing. We run through the list of tasks and she also has a hard time finding a suitable place to do lane changes and at our suggestion we end up doing lane changes in some small bumps, very cool.

My knees are killing me after day one but other than that I feel pretty good about my skiing. Day two we ski with Ray Allard from nine till twelve and the results are posts after 1:30.

Day 2

Conditions: it’s colder and they’re making snow, the slopes are groomed and my nemesis (big icy bumps) are nowhere in sight. Other than having to ski through the snow guns the conditions are pretty good. The snow makers worked their magic overnight.

Skiing with Ray

We meet up in the lodge at 9:00 sharp. Ray is no nonsense kind of guy and tells us straight up that if we didn’t bring it with us we’re not going to find it on the hill and we are not going to be spending time standing around. We run through the maneuvers pretty quickly and finish up around 11:00. I get a “nice” out of him for my wedge demo. He says it’s too early to go in but the exam is over and there is something he wants all of us to work on, releasing the edges and guiding the skis to start the turn. We do two drills, one is not quite a patience turn and the other is a sort of modified pivot slip. Exam over, a group of us head back up the hill for one last run.

I was lucky to be with this group, everyone, well most everyone, was enthusiastic and mostly optimistic about the exam. No surprise that the unenthusiastic individual did not pass and was the only candidate from our group that did not pass. Which means I PASSED and received passing scores from all three examiners.

Comment from Ray Allard:
Very consistent in everything we did! Sound movement pattern. While it’s a subtle thing, you could develop more “flow” or continuing motion in connecting turns-keep all parts moving forward. Good job!

Comment from Kristi and Bill Beerman:
To continue development focus on strengthening the inside shoulder. Inside shoulder and hip need to stay ahead of the outside half of the body.
I spoke with Kristi after the results were posted about her comment and she said it’s not a big thing and I should be able to easily correct it by not squaring up with the skis so much.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

Good Stuff

Thanks gentlemen. It will be very helpful.

I also picked up the skiing standards DVD from the Eastern Office.

Congratulations on your successes thus far and good luck in future endeavors.

rob
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiprob View Post
The feedback on wedge was I need to transition my CoM to the inside ski during initiation. The gap between the snow and the ski needs to disappear.
Gap between which ski and the snow, inside/outside? The whole ski? The edge of the ski? The back or front of the ski? The only thing one of those that would be a subtle mistake is the edge of the inside ski. The others would be glaring mistakes.

In a gliding wedge, you would have a slight gap between the outside edge of both skis and the snow (assuming hard snow).

Now when you go into a wedge turn, your CoM should move slightly to the center of the turn; your hips move laterally to the center of the turn; the inside ski should decrease edge angle until there is no gap, i.e., becomes flat. (You outside ski should slightly increase edge angle).

Oh, if your inside ski goes past flat to the other edge, you just did a wedge-christie. Some examiners may instructor you to always hold a wedge even though the slope is steep enough that it would be easier to christie. Some may want you to spontenously christie as the intensity increases. You need to do it they way they ask you to.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiprob View Post
The feedback on wedge was I need to transition my CoM to the inside ski during initiation. The gap between the snow and the ski needs to disappear.
Gap between which ski and the snow, inside/outside? The whole ski? The edge of the ski? The back or front of the ski? The only thing one of those that would be a subtle mistake is the edge of the inside ski. The others would be glaring mistakes.

In a gliding wedge, you would have a slight gap between the outside edge of both skis and the snow (assuming hard snow).

Now when you go into a wedge turn, your CoM should move slightly to the center of the turn; your hips move laterally to the center of the turn; the inside ski should decrease edge angle until there is no gap, i.e., becomes flat. (You outside ski should slightly increase edge angle).

Oh, if your inside ski goes past flat to the other edge, you just did a wedge-christie. Some examiners may instructor you to always hold a wedge even though the slope is steep enough that it would be easier to christie. Some may want you to spontenously christie as the intensity increases. You need to do it they way they ask you to.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
You need to do it they way they ask you to.
Good advice from learn2turn. Listen carefully to what the examiner is saying and do what they say, not what they do unless they specifically direct you to ski the task or demo the way they do it. In more than one instance the examiner described the task one way and skied another way. If you are confused or don't understand speak up, it is most likely that you are only going to get one shot at it.

Get to know the rest of the candidates and work as a team, be supportive not critical of each other. You're all in it together so make the most of it.

Be prepared to answer questions relating to the tasks and demos, it's not just about the skiing.

Have fun with it, skiing is recreation.

The skiing isn't just about the skiing and the teaching isn't just about the teaching. When you take part two the examiners are still looking at your skiing, especially your demos. Make sure you ski what you say.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillA View Post
Listen carefully to what the examiner is saying and do what they say, not what they do unless they specifically direct you to ski the task or demo the way they do it. In more than one instance the examiner described the task one way and skied another way. If you are confused or don't understand speak up, it is most likely that you are only going to get one shot at it.

Get to know the rest of the candidates and work as a team, be supportive not critical of each other. You're all in it together so make the most of it.

Be prepared to answer questions relating to the tasks and demos, it's not just about the skiing.
I have heard differing thoughts on this..

My take, If they don't specify and just tell you to do "beginning wedge christies" and then ski off, do what they say. If they say do "Beginning wedge christies and here's an example" and they don't do what you thought they said, follow their tracks and do exactly what they demo'ed. Be prepared to answer questions on why your demo was not what they asked..

If they start to ski off, Stop them and ask for a demo "excuse me, can you show us the turn you want to see" Then you are all seeing the same size turn, turn shape, and hopefully image.

Encourage the rest of your group and support each other. It takes a lot of stress away from the process.

If they do something other than what they said they were going to do, I have found you will get a second or third shot at it.. but only if you call them on it so yes speak up.

One thing I have found, Most examiners really want to give you every possiblity and chance at getting it right so if there was some confusion, they will do the task again but you have to speak up!

DC
post #9 of 16
Another thing about L2 is they will be helpful, the examiner wants you to pass but won't pass you unless you can demonstrate that you can do the task to the standard . I found the instruction for the tasks at the L2 exam exceptionally clear. You will probably get two shots at each task. If you do it and they don't ask you to try again, chances are you nailed it.

If you do ask questions, ask clarifying questions about the tasks if you are not sure exactly the way they want you to do it. Don't ask questions that may demonstrate your weaknesses. One guy in my group when instructed to free ski "dynamic parallel" asked "What is dynamic parallel"? If he had read even the intro material on ATS or had instruction in ATS from a competent trainer at his local mountain, he would have no reason to ask such a question. Did he pass? Take a guess.
post #10 of 16
Skiprob,

What area do you teach at?? I'm not too far away if you are interested in working on the demos with me at my area. It is often the low level demos that candidates in both LII and LIII have problems with. PM me if you are interested in some help.

RW
post #11 of 16
Probably the hardest demo to do properly, wedge christies beginning and advanced!..

Seems like the most basic demo and yet so much of your foundation in skiing is based on the movement patterns in these demos done properly.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post
Probably the hardest demo to do properly, wedge christies beginning and advanced!..

Seems like the most basic demo and yet so much of your foundation in skiing is based on the movement patterns in these demos done properly.
It depends on who you are. I passed my L2 skiing last year and teaching last week, but for me the hardest reference maneuver remains the wedge, not the wedge christie, becuase I have a long torso, and it takes only the most minute leverage for me to let the skis christie.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG
I passed my L2 skiing last year and teaching last week
Congratulations
post #14 of 16
One of the recurring themes at my L2 exam this year was no "sequential movements". If you know what that means, practice not being sequential. Going from down hill run to side slip which was part of the exam, is where the sequential movements really come out. If that is part of your exam, which it could be, practice the move.

ST
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillA View Post
Congratulations
Thank you. The achievement reflects quite a team effort of the part of my ski area training staff, and is much more than my individual achievement.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

Maybe next season

Thanks so much for your assistance, advice and offers for assistance.

Based on discussions with my training director, I will not be taking the exam this season.

All the best!
rob
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › PSIA-E Level II Skiing Reference Maneuvers