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Skis for USCSA racer

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hello all
While im not new to skiing, im relatively new to ski racing. This year i joined my college ski team, and bumbled my way through the season on non-racing skis. I skied K2 Axis Mod X 181cm for GS and Volkl Energy 420 177cm(!) with a 19m(!!!) sidecut for slalom. I never raced slalom because i could never finish a run because of the sidecut.

For next season id like to get some real racing skis. In the USCSA South-east conference, nobody cares about regulations, and many people ski their SL skis in GS without even a look from the judges.

Im 6'6" and ~250 lbs. Because im PSIA certified, i get pro-forms at fischer, atomic, salomon, and dynastar, but im primarily interested in the atomic and fischer lines. Most people on the team prefer fischer, but I still have no idea which SL ski i need and in what length.
post #2 of 16
Even though your conference is not competitive I would get legal skis. At your size you will not have trouble with anything in a legal length (165 and 185). I am not sure what your skill level is so you may want to elaborate on that before people go and recommend race stock skis to you. My experience is with the Eastern and Mid-East conferences - which are highly competitive. If you aren't on race sotck skis and have a very strong skill set you are aren't going to do well at all in those conferences. However, when at regionals and nationals I realized that this is not the case in all conferences. Non-stock Atomics or Fischers might be the way to go, but we would have to hear more about your ability (where you were finishing, what your points are, etc.).
Later
GREG
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
As far as my ability goes, I carve medium to long radius turns, although i have never been able to carve short turns due to the long radii of my skis. According to PSIA standards, i ski at a level 8, although i dont generally go in the bumps.

As this past season was my first season racing, I am still learning all the tricks of the trade, but i am able to finish GS races in the middle of the pack. On the practice SL course I am able to crossblock a few gates until i become too late and have to skid in order to make the next gate. I blame this on my skis, as I have no problem carving through a GS course.
post #4 of 16
Alright, now that was helpful. Based on what you just said I would look toward "cheater" skis for GS and SL. Honestly I think they best skis for you might be the Fischer WC SC and the Fischer WC RC. The SC has a turn radius of about 12m and the RC is around 18 or 19 I think. They are vertical sidewall and laminate layup - just like the real race skis. These are not to be confused with the WC SL and WC GS - which are the race stock variants of these skis which sport FIS legal sizes, radii, and the demanding nature that comes along with them. The nice part about these skis, is that while they are still "comsumer" race skis, they are VERY fast, and will not hold you back in terms of being competitive. They will however be a great learning tool for both SL and GS - without making you work to ski on them.
Later
GREG
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you, that was very helpful. Does a vertical sidewall mean it will be more or less difficult to put on an edge bevel than say a trapezoidal ski? cuz that was a pain in the ass...
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Also, do you think that race stock skis would be too much ski for me? On pro forms they generally list race stock skis as opposed to consumer race skis, so it would be easier/cheaper for me to get race stock.
post #7 of 16
Vertical sidewall means full length sidewalls as opposed to cap constructions. They need not be completely vertical as in the literal sense. My experience with pro forms is actually the opposite, they usually only list retail skis with race stock being listed on separate race forms.

Also, I agree with Heluva on Fischer RC/SC type skis.
post #8 of 16
Dynastar is selling off all of their race stuff right now on their pro site, I would look into them. They've been one of my favorites over the years along with Elan.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Even though your conference is not competitive I would get legal skis. At your size you will not have trouble with anything in a legal length (165 and 185). I am not sure what your skill level is so you may want to elaborate on that before people go and recommend race stock skis to you. My experience is with the Eastern and Mid-East conferences - which are highly competitive. If you aren't on race sotck skis and have a very strong skill set you are aren't going to do well at all in those conferences. However, when at regionals and nationals I realized that this is not the case in all conferences.
On a side note about the Southeastern conference, wasn't Lees-McRae College in NC making a run at the national title a few years ago? I remember Nathan Schwing came out of that program who later did quite well at U.S. Nationals and Noram's. Although currently, for whatever reason, Lees-McRae appears to no longer have a team, so the conference may very well be in the pits...
post #10 of 16
Polk,
I think that race stock is probably more than you want to commit to at this point in your racing career. I think that by going to race stock skis you would end up hindering your learning and probably not be as fast. Maybe in the long run (say 2 or 3 seasons down the road), you may need race stock skis, but by then your retail race skis would need to be replaced anyway. When I had racers with your experience, it was very rare that I immediately put them on race stock equipment. Usually I would get them on a ski that they could learn very easily on and then once they had aquired high level skill and showed the need for higher level skis I would encourage them to move to race stock equipment exclusively.
Later
GREG
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
On a side note about the Southeastern conference, wasn't Lees-McRae College in NC making a run at the national title a few years ago? I remember Nathan Schwing came out of that program who later did quite well at U.S. Nationals and Noram's. Although currently, for whatever reason, Lees-McRae appears to no longer have a team, so the conference may very well be in the pits...
Lees is quite good, as well as a few others down there, but there is an extreme discrepancy between the varsity schools and the club schools in that conference - whereas in the northeast the teams are much more closely matched. Overall, the teams are not as close as the Mid-Atlantic group - or the Eastern group. My girls just qualified for nationals again so I guess I will know in a few weeks who the teams to beat are.
Later
GREG
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Lees is quite good, as well as a few others down there, but there is an extreme discrepancy between the varsity schools and the club schools in that conference - whereas in the northeast the teams are much more closely matched. Overall, the teams are not as close as the Mid-Atlantic group - or the Eastern group. My girls just qualified for nationals again so I guess I will know in a few weeks who the teams to beat are.
Later
GREG
I see a 2nd and 3rd place. Congrats .
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks heluva, thats very helpful. now i just get to wait till next season when i actually have money...skis + bindings+ pole guards + shin guards + more wax + more tuning **** = 4 shitloads of cash for a college student
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by polkaudioguy View Post
Thanks heluva, thats very helpful. now i just get to wait till next season when i actually have money...skis + bindings+ pole guards + shin guards + more wax + more tuning **** = 4 shitloads of cash for a college student
I can sympathize with that, quite an expensive sport on a college budget...

Keep at it and kick ass!
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Even as tall as i am, do you think that regulation size (165) is good, or should i go longer?
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by polkaudioguy View Post
Even as tall as i am, do you think that regulation size (165) is good, or should i go longer?
Definitely stick with the FIS lengths. There is no reason to make yourself work harder than you have to by using a longer SL ski. Once you get good at GS, you may want a 193-ish ski. It depends largely on the course sets you'll be encountering. At this point, though, stick with FIS lengths.
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