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Rooster Tail

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've seen a skier, who is a good solid well-skilled skier not a hack, on K2 Apache Strikers and every time he goes by on a day when there's some soft snow, there's a rooster tail of snow flying behind him. And just just a little bit, we're talk 5' high and 15' long. Anyone ever see this with this or any other ski?

I did notice that the ski has a bit of a turned up tail (but not near like a twin tip) and the tail also is very round instead of square (more like a twin tip). I'm wondering if it's the combination of the round tail and the slight turn up (maybe 1/2" or so) that causes the rooster tail.
post #2 of 19
Your right,it's the turned up tail that creates the effect.
post #3 of 19
yup.
Some day I'll let you follow me when I'm on my Seths...
post #4 of 19
a good buddy of mine skis some twin tips that have a serious upturn in the tail... everytime I ski behind him I seem to catch his rooster tail right in the middle of the chest.... reminds me to ski faster.
post #5 of 19
My brother in law has 1080s and is a great skier. Between his skills and the rooster tail, he often leaves me in the dust several ways! I think any ski with an upturned/rounded tail will have some sort of rooster tail, some more than others. My Karmas leave a big tail behind, and in spring snow it's like flinging cement into the air. I would not want to be behind me...
post #6 of 19
I've seen this pronounced rooster tail phenomenon get produced by twin-tips as well. What causes it though?
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
What causes it though?

Venturi effect.
post #8 of 19
my karmas do it too. twin tips are antisocial
post #9 of 19
If you go switch on race skis they rooster.;-)
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I've seen this pronounced rooster tail phenomenon get produced by twin-tips as well. What causes it though?
I would want to get a little more data and study it in detail before saying for sure, but if it is like the rooster tail behind boats, then it's a combination of: 1) a large aft-facing base area that leaves a wake, and 2) a "coanda effect" that causes flow to follow a curved surface and turn (upward in this case). These both assume that there is air flow involved behind the rear tip, which suggests speed plays a big role. Snow by itself doesn't flow like a fluid, so it stands to reason the airflow is important. I'll see if I can gin up an analysis.
post #11 of 19
Come on guys - it's pretty simple - when the turned up tail is angled toward the snow (like when you're turning) the tail picks up any loose snow from the surface and kicks it up.

Deeper snow + faster speed = a bigger rooster.

I've even commented that the very abrupt up-turn angle on the Nordica Enforcer and Blower feel really odd when those skis are turned up on a high edge - it's like the tail is grabbing into the slope.

I've never seen a twin-tip kick up a rooster when the skier is just straight-lining unless there's more than 6" of snow so that the tail is below the surface.
post #12 of 19
mY B5's do it all the time
post #13 of 19
I have Pocket Rockets and Elan M666's and they both do it, the PRs most of all. I go with the theory that they catch the loose snow when you turn and flick it over the top sheet of the ski, up into the face of those following too close.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
I would want to get a little more data and study it in detail before saying for sure, but if it is like the rooster tail behind boats, then it's a combination of: 1) a large aft-facing base area that leaves a wake, and 2) a "coanda effect" that causes flow to follow a curved surface and turn (upward in this case). These both assume that there is air flow involved behind the rear tip, which suggests speed plays a big role. Snow by itself doesn't flow like a fluid, so it stands to reason the airflow is important. I'll see if I can gin up an analysis.
This info is worthless without a few charts and graphs, some complicated trigonometry and a geometry equation involving two ski poles.
post #15 of 19
post #16 of 19
Rooster tails should be one of the selling points for twins, nothing is more fun than getting right in front of your too cool for school 14 year old brother and letting him have it for a couple of hundred yards.
post #17 of 19
I love getting in front of my ski buddies when I'm on my Gotamas. They kick up a rooster tail like a jet boat. When they complain I tell em if they don't like it then pass me
post #18 of 19
Tele-Switch on Twin Tips, that's wrong in so many ways.
post #19 of 19
As a ski travels over snow, it compresses the snow creating energy. The exaggerated turned up tail of a twin tip allows the built up energy to release abruptly creating a rooster tail.
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