EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Suggestions for wall mounting ski rack
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Suggestions for wall mounting ski rack

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Friends, I am looking for a rack that I can mount on the interior wall of my garage to get our families skis off the floor. The ideal rig would be some sort of horizontal platform that I could mount up high and out of the way. If not, something that holds the skis vertically would be ok. The interior wall is sheathed in plywood. Many thanks.
post #2 of 17
I have a wire rack (coated with white epoxy) made by Racor. They have a two and four ski model. They also hold the poles and two pairs of boots. It holds them vertically. I bought it online for $35.00. It mounts with four screws.
post #3 of 17
hooks from your rafters. assuming the rafters don't work themselves.

i always wanted a rack that would store my skis horrizontal, so I could palce them binding down in a weak attempt to preserve camber.
post #4 of 17
I build my own out of 1" dowels and a piece of plywood. Drill two holes 2" apart and glue/screw the dowels in place. Usually do about 10 spots, they all seem to get filled up sooner or later. Skis hang in pairs by the curved tip. It sort of helps to preserve camber. You have to tie up the tails of cross country skis as there are no brakes to help keep them together. Poles slide into the same slot formed by the dowels.

Steve
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
So is it better to store skis hung by the tips or have them lay flat - even upside-down as samuri suggests?
post #6 of 17
I use two of these. 2 screws each. works well.

http://www.reliableracing.com/detail...&category=4600
post #7 of 17
Check out this thread, it includes pictures of mine.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...light=ski+rack
post #8 of 17
Bordz-UpTM has a Pipeline Ski rack that is made of aircraft grade aluminum.  You can order the two ski rack or the four ski rack.  It would look nice anywhere in the home or garage!  Check out www.bordzup.com for more information and ordering of the ski rack.
post #9 of 17

Bump.

 

I am grappling with this problem right now. I need to build a ski rack along my basement wall. The basement is finished so it would be mounting into the drywall / studs.

 

On the basis of style, ease, and space efficiency, I'd like to build one of the peg racks that holds them by the tips. However, the idea of hanging the skis by the tips makes me uncomfortable. I can't find any reliable information about whether or not this damages / alters the camber / rocker profile or tips. Hanging the skis by the tips seems like one of things that plausibly *could* be harmful.

 

The less elegant alternative that abounds is two vertical boards with begs coming out to lay the skis horizontally. I am not clear on how exactly to drill the 3/4" spade bit holes for the dowels at a consistent, slight upward angle.

 

How do you store your skis? I'm very interested to see what others have done.

post #10 of 17

This rack design in my garage I have used for years, I have found none better.

 

 

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bliz1978 View Post
 

Bump.

 

I am grappling with this problem right now. I need to build a ski rack along my basement wall. The basement is finished so it would be mounting into the drywall / studs.

 

On the basis of style, ease, and space efficiency, I'd like to build one of the peg racks that holds them by the tips. However, the idea of hanging the skis by the tips makes me uncomfortable. I can't find any reliable information about whether or not this damages / alters the camber / rocker profile or tips. Hanging the skis by the tips seems like one of things that plausibly *could* be harmful.

 

The less elegant alternative that abounds is two vertical boards with begs coming out to lay the skis horizontally. I am not clear on how exactly to drill the 3/4" spade bit holes for the dowels at a consistent, slight upward angle.

 

How do you store your skis? I'm very interested to see what others have done.

 

my easier but probably more expensive solution, was just to buy track shelving and brackets. Then your only skill needed is to be able to drill a pilot hole somewhat horizontally,and screw a tracks somewhat vertically to a beam, and the other track at the same height (buy a level, or measure from something you know is horizontal!).  You will not need to worry about any potentially shoddy carpentry skills, wood breaking, or going cockeyed at all different angles, or worksmanship.  It'll all be metal, and a bracket is the device to properly remain at 90degrees and still transfer weight from horizontal to the vertical without any deflection.  The tracks and brackets do add up though, compared to if i were handy and could craft  this out of driftwood that I gathered for free..

 

I also cut some sections of foam pipe insulation and slipped that on the brackets which also grips/cushions the skis.

Besides the shopping, the whole project was done in about 20min, and that was me going slow, since i was figuring it out for the first time.

 

I went with single track brackets, which is a little floppy sideways, but stable once the skis are on there (still rated at 200lbs per shelf!).  Dual track would be much stable if that bothers you, and rated to hold even more weight.  But it's also more expensive, and the brackets are taller(can't fit them as close).  You can also choose your track lengths and bracket lengths however you want, they have all kinds of options at the hardware store. If you are paranoid, you can also "lock" in the brackets by wedging something into the track position once you have their positions set, but I skipped that step. (dual tracks have a screw lock). 

 

You can also adjust the heights and change them down the road to fit in more rows (although the screws interfere with some positions), and will make it trickier to extract skis.  If you got to store lot of skis, you can double them overlapping on some rows, as long as you interleave the bindings with the skis above or below.  For the doubled up skis, I don't lock the brakes so that they're actually stressing  the ski, but that's just me.

 

As far as the camber and rocker, i don't think it really matters, as long as you're not locking up the brakes together.  When the skis are new and flat and stored at the store, they're horizontal, vertical every which way, and seem fine.  

 

Plus if you bought into Blizzard's flipcore marketting like me, then skis are pressed in their natural shape, so aren't being stressed, amirite?  

 

Here's a longer shot, and then a close up of the top row where the bonafides live.

 


Edited by raytseng - 9/9/14 at 12:03am
post #12 of 17

Skis take priority over books :eek , pretty cool Freudian prioritization at work, expedient..this is our notion of wall mount - a friend set it up..works

AppleMark

post #13 of 17

I built a vertical storage rack that holds 12 pairs.

 

You need a 12' 2x4, 2X36" 3/8" dowels, glue and a drill.

 

Lay out the pattern on the  2x4 - I used a rack I had for a model - make sure to leave room for tall bindings (unless you alternate adult and kid skis).  This takes a little simple math.  

 

Pattern like this  OO    OO    OO    OO    OO   OO ......

 

Drill the holes. Try to keep straight.  Drill press would be handy but I free handed it.  (pilot holes first).  Measure (more Math) and cut the dowels.About 4" should protrude. Glue and Insert.  Don't worry about too snug a fit.  Glue does most of the work.   I ran out of dowels so on 4 of the holes (2 pair skis) I had to use pieces of old ski pole and a piece of uniform diameter, smoothly chewed beaver stick.  :)  Tap in a few nails in between dowels or on the ends for hanging poles.  

 

Add a few small thin scraps of wood to the bottom inside edge of the rack so the dowels project UP at a SLIGHT angle. (prob a couple or three bolts would work too) Screw the rack to the wall studs.  Hang the skis and pray for snow.  

post #14 of 17

i use those flip down bike racks that they sell at Depot.  i have two mounted in the basement and 2 in the garage.  I alternate skis and bikes  based on the season.  the skis hang at the bindings, so no stress on the ski's camber (if that matters).  they're neat and real easy to install (2 screws into the studs). you can put at least 2 pair on each bracket.

post #15 of 17
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

 

my easier but probably more expensive solution, was just to buy track shelving and brackets. Then your only skill needed is to be able to drill a pilot hole somewhat horizontally,and screw a tracks somewhat vertically to a beam, and the other track at the same height (buy a level, or measure from something you know is horizontal!).  You will not need to worry about any potentially shoddy carpentry skills, wood breaking, or going cockeyed at all different angles, or worksmanship.  It'll all be metal, and a bracket is the device to properly remain at 90degrees and still transfer weight from horizontal to the vertical without any deflection.  The tracks and brackets do add up though, compared to if i were handy and could craft  this out of driftwood that I gathered for free..

 

I also cut some sections of foam pipe insulation and slipped that on the brackets which also grips/cushions the skis.

Besides the shopping, the whole project was done in about 20min, and that was me going slow, since i was figuring it out for the first time.

 

I went with single track brackets, which is a little floppy sideways, but stable once the skis are on there (still rated at 200lbs per shelf!).  Dual track would be much stable if that bothers you, and rated to hold even more weight.  But it's also more expensive, and the brackets are taller(can't fit them as close).  You can also choose your track lengths and bracket lengths however you want, they have all kinds of options at the hardware store. If you are paranoid, you can also "lock" in the brackets by wedging something into the track position once you have their positions set, but I skipped that step. (dual tracks have a screw lock). 

 

You can also adjust the heights and change them down the road to fit in more rows (although the screws interfere with some positions), and will make it trickier to extract skis.  If you got to store lot of skis, you can double them overlapping on some rows, as long as you interleave the bindings with the skis above or below.  For the doubled up skis, I don't lock the brakes so that they're actually stressing  the ski, but that's just me.

 

As far as the camber and rocker, i don't think it really matters, as long as you're not locking up the brakes together.  When the skis are new and flat and stored at the store, they're horizontal, vertical every which way, and seem fine.  

 

Plus if you bought into Blizzard's flipcore marketting like me, then skis are pressed in their natural shape, so aren't being stressed, amirite?  

 

Here's a longer shot, and then a close up of the top row where the bonafides live.

 

 

 

Great dual purpose book shelf. I guess the books act as a sort of counter weight.

post #17 of 17

I was looking through this thread and noticed the first few posts were about store skis in the garage.  I would offer up the friendly tip to avoid storing in the garage if at all possible.  You may want to store your skis in a good climate that isn't too damp (possibly a garage or basement) or too hot/dry (possibly a garage or attic).  My father-in-law had a nice pair of K2s.  He took a few years away from skiing when he lived in Louisiana and then Texas.  He stored his skis in the garage and/or the attic while living in the south.  When he returned to skiing about 5 years later, the top sheets came off and the rest of the ski kind of fell apart.  Perhaps not coincidentally, in the same trip, the toe box on one of his boots busted out.  Granted, by the time he came back to skiing, his equipment was several years older, but we attributed it to storing it in his garage and attic where it was hot and humid (Louisiana) or dry (Texas).  I have 6 sets of skis at my house (3 old sets I picked up just to have, my wife's set, and my 2 sets), and I have laid them flat under the bed in the guest room for storage.  Here they are in a climate controlled environment, won't get scratched or damaged, and are out of sight.  These are just some thoughts on the subject.  To each his/her own.  Have a great day.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Suggestions for wall mounting ski rack