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I tire out too easlily

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I don't know why, but I can't seem to get more than 4 hours of skiing in before my quads and calfs hurt. I've been away from skiing for three years and in the past have been able to do about 5-6 hours before packing it in.
post #2 of 17
How long have you been back at skiing? Have you been doing much work that involves balancing lately? My legs are always screaming for the first two or three days back, despite doing some weight training and a whole lot of cycling during the skiing off-season.

Also, if you aren't well-balanced in your boots, you could be using muscle (as oppossed to your bones) to support your weight, which will destroy your legs really quick.

Finally, the best fatique reducer I've ever found is to learn to ski better -- the more slicing and less skidding my skis do, the longer my legs last.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Might be worth it to take a clinic. I have a really bad habit of sitting in the back seat. My Head boots don't help much because they don't have much rearward support.
post #4 of 17
You don't want to feel the backs of your boots while skiing. I was wondering how your quads and calves both got sore, but now I know.
post #5 of 17
Shoulda gone on that date.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
There's also the fear factor. I don't know when I developed fear. I've only been a fearful skier during my beginner/lower intermediate days. I'm hung up over being in control all the time. Thus I'm tense and can't relax. Which also may explain the fatigue.

Waaaahhhh. I wanted to do Last Tango today but my legs gave out on the groomers.
post #7 of 17
A backseat bias will definitely tire out your quads/calves, because they are trying to compensate to hold you forward. Also, you might want to think about doing something to strengthen your legs. More time on the elliptical machine at the gym eliminated quad pain I used to get when skiing long steep trails.

Do your boots have an adjustable cuff spoiler in the rear? You could try adjusting that. I never had any issues with my old boots, but I got new boots this year and occasionally felt my balance drift backwards. I raised the spoilers and it solved the problem in a very noticeable way. I think I needed that rigid reinforcement to help keep my lower leg angled properly.

Finally, how is your general fitness? I lost 40lb last summer, and am skiing better than ever. In fact, I had four 8-hour ski days in a row last weekend and felt great. In the past I used to get tired just carrying my gear to and from the car!! So if there is any part of your general fitness that could be improved, work on it -- it really helped my skiing. Check your body mass index (http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/) and use that as guidance to see if you should lose weight.

Good luck!
post #8 of 17
Try snowboarding. It's less demanding of strength and more fun than alpine skiing. Or telemark and get strong like bull.
post #9 of 17
Ski easy long trails non-stop. This will get your legs into shape! Also, learn to relax when you ski!
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
...
Do your boots have an adjustable cuff spoiler in the rear? You could try adjusting that. I never had any issues with my old boots, but I got new boots this year and occasionally felt my balance drift backwards. I raised the spoilers and it solved the problem in a very noticeable way. I think I needed that rigid reinforcement to help keep my lower leg angled properly.

Finally, how is your general fitness? I lost 40lb last summer, and am skiing better than ever. In fact, I had four 8-hour ski days in a row last weekend and felt great. In the past I used to get tired just carrying my gear to and from the car!! So if there is any part of your general fitness that could be improved, work on it -- it really helped my skiing. Check your body mass index (http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/) and use that as guidance to see if you should lose weight.

Good luck!
I agree. I have not been taking care of myself and my skiing has been suffering because of it. I could get away with abusing myself in my 20's but in my 30's I realize it takes more effort to maintain myself.
post #11 of 17
Why do so many (most) skiiers spend so many bucks on new/better equipment when the problem is their lack of skill? Why are they so resistant to taking lessons? Truly.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
ant,

I'm playing catch up after a three year hiatus on skis. I've got better equipment but I still can't pinpoint what the root cause is. It's not fun having to stop a third down a long tail and have to catch your breath. Nothing breaks your motivation to ski like not skiing at your potential. It's like I turned the clock back 13 years in ability and endurance. I do plan on taking lessons in addition to addressing potential issues with my equipment.
post #13 of 17
The root cause has already been mentioned to you based on your description and quite a few suggestions to fix that have been offered.

There is another thread going right now that suggests the proper order of things sking. Technique, equipment, morphology, and at least one more that escapes me right now.

forget your equipment for the moment, proper technique will trump equipment issues and morphology (I just love big words!!!) will help less than stellar technique keep you going and going and going.

In a nutshell, the best, first thing to do is take a lesson---in whatever gear you have availabl and in whatever shape you are in right now.

Then work on the rest.
post #14 of 17
If you're skiing pretty good, it might be a fitness/ endurance issue or how you are picking turns. I consider myself reasonable fit and able to do 7 hour days without too much problem. I notched up my skill plateau this season with intense training with a couple of high level examiners/ trainers (csia and psia for cert. 1/2). I've been told by them that I am technically sound (no major problems just nitpicky issues) etc but I still get killed after a run following them, why? If you're doing quick short radius turns on an unforgiving ski, your legs wILL hurt after a few dozen or so because it more anaerobic activity than a long carved GS turn....

think about how you're turning...it might be the root cause...
post #15 of 17
I find carving more demanding of fitness than skidding. Leaning back, crouching and other technical flaws in your skiing can contribute to fatigue but I don't think skiing at a higher skill level will necessarily solve this problem. I take lessons and have pretty good technique but I get fatigued easily.

Buddha, maybe you are skiing more dynamically and faster than you used to. This takes more strength. Since you are now tiring in a shorter time than before, I don't think it's your technique, unless you ski worse now : .

I think morphology refers to bady type (ectomorph, endomorph, or mesomorph) somewhat predetermined by genetics. Maybe a bit dated theory, but I'll claim that excuse. Fitness on the other hand is something I can improve, so I'll take the blame there.

Buddha, accept your limitations and enjoy the skiing. Don't stress about it. Do what you can to get stronger (gym, weights?), improve your skills to make skiing more fun if not less demanding. (Be safe and) Have fun!

I wasn't kidding about snowboard being less fatiguing and telemark making your legs really strong. If you are already invested in alpine skiing, stick with that I guess, but nothing beats a half day of telemark skiing followed by half day of snowboarding. Just loads more fun and better for you.
post #16 of 17
2 hrs/ 4hrs/ full-day = meaningless. How many runs is this? How much vertical?

My local hill is basically 2 high-speed 6-person lifts, about 1500' vertical. If there are no lift lines, you can do 8-10 runs per hour, non-stop laps. 3-4 hrs solid of this and I'm toast.

OTOH, I had a pass at Kirkwood last year, which has great terrain but slow lifts, which don't actually run to where you want to ski. So every run is a slow ride up, involves lots of traversing to where you want to go, and then once you've skied down, traversing back to the lift. A full 7 hrs at Kirkwood yields maybe 10-15 runs, if that.
post #17 of 17
It sounds like general fitness issue but also bear in mind additional body weight has an impact. Any additional pounds you have to support on a slope at speed adds to the wear and tear on your muscles, tendons, joints and such.

But - you don't want to sacrifice muscle mass too much - so the thing is to get leaner and stronger and lose fat.
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