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Binding mis-mount

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Just wondering...

I'm a former tech, and kinda boned up a free-hand mount (Soli 810's on to Rossi Scratch FS's). The bindings are slightly off (about 1.5 - 2mm in the toe, and about 3mm in the heel). Slightly skewed basically. Both ski are off to the same side slightly (slightly to the right on both skis. Basically, my jig didn't fit a wider ski, so I built one, measured everything LOTS of times, but was still off. I could ski them, but I'm kinda anal about stuff being right.

I'm thinking it's not going to be a big deal performance or safety wise, but I'm wondering if anyone else has any experience with this type of situation. How critical is a couple mm in the grand scheme of things? All other adjustments are looking great.

I'm planning to take them to a shop (finally got a hook-up, but it's going to be a long drive) where they'll hook me up with a jig. I don't feel like shelling out nearly $100 to get some bindings screwed on to my boards (I have 2 sets of skis needing mounting).

PLEASE don't bother with the "you should just take them to a shop and have them done professionally" comments. I know that, but I'll take my chances. I'm not concerned about the torque test - I never had a new Soli binding fail - EVER. I know my stuff - I worked in an on-hill shop for 3 years, and saw too many dolts that were hired and fired along the way. I'm pretty confident in my abilities, and don't trust many people with my gear. Except for stone grinding, as I don't have a Fontaine at home...

Thanks,
Chris
post #2 of 13
I know it would bug the heck out of me, but I would probably ski on them first to see if it was noticeable, before developing an ulcer. It would definitely be an issue on a narrow waisted carving ski. On a Scratch FS I can see how it might be less of an issue. I don't know about anyone else, but when I ski my twin tips (generally in soft snow) my whole style/technique gets a little more relaxed and the adjustments I make on the slopes would make 1.5-3mm seem like a small increment.

Are you measuring the error relative to the metal edges? Don't trust the topsheet graphics. I mounted a pair of RailFlex plates/bindings in December and on first glance they seemed off (inconceivable considering how I marked the screw holes). Sure enough, the top sheet graphics were out of whack just a little. Relative to the edges, where I marked the centerline from, they were fine.

BTW, I agree with you that a qualified DIY'er can probably mount bindings as well or better than a shop tech in most cases, despite your (and my) mistakes to the contrary!
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Skier219,

Developing an ulcer - good one! LOL!

Thanks for not scolding me! I did my measurements using the topsheet edge (not the graphics other than the center line), since the sloped sidewalls make for a tough edge to effectively use. I'm going to get another caliper though...something a little wider and DIGITAL! Hopefully I can get access to a jig this weekend if all goes well, but in the meantime, this was just BUGGING me.

I posted a similar thread over at TGR where I thought I'd get a little more DIY love, but got a little ribbing there - imagine that! Anyway, I guess the reason for doing my own work is that I trust myself more on my own gear than others - especially since I've been out of "the biz" for a number of years, and don't really know any shop guys any more. That's just my hangup though. When I was a tech, I was the guy who was there because I loved doing it, not because I got a free ski pass. The other guys screwed up more stuff than I care to think about, and there's still plenty of those guys left. My stuff was always SPOT ON, and I figured a freehand mount would be easy enough, but a millimeter here and there really add up.

I'll relax about it a bit then and maybe just try the skis out first before pluggind and re-drilling. It kinda depends on whether or not I get to use that jig this weekend.

Thanks for your input.
post #4 of 13
Take the binding off, re-tighten the screws while pushing against the binding in the direction the binding needs to move. You can get 1-2mm pretty easy like this. But as a "former tech" you probably already know this...
post #5 of 13
Cant you just massage the binding holes with a Dremel so that its where it should be?
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Take the binding off, re-tighten the screws while pushing against the binding in the direction the binding needs to move. You can get 1-2mm pretty easy like this. But as a "former tech" you probably already know this...
I appreciate the tip. I did try that. That's a good basic carpentry trick. It didn't work much though, and as these are foam-core skis, I didn't want to force the issue too much - I don't have a helicoil kit.

I also really appreciate your tongue-in-cheek criticism/insult. Thanks for getting to know me. : "People" like you are why I love the internet -- it's a great place to sit behind your keyboard and be a Monday morning critic.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
Cant you just massage the binding holes with a Dremel so that its where it should be?
Not a bad idea, but I'd rather not - I think it would widen them a bit too much. 1-2mm is quite a bit when it comes to screw holes, and like I mentioned, with a foam core ski, I think the integrity of the hole would be challenged a bit too much. I don't want to tear screws out - especially if it happens to be one of those spots where you don't want a mechanical failure. I've only had that happen to me with foam cores before (Salomons), so I'm a little gunshy about that.

FWIW - I don't even like putting screws in existing holes. Trying to re-seat the bindings made me nervous enough - just tapping them had me biting my lip... :
post #8 of 13
Where they mounted now. Just remount 1cm back or forward.I like to measure the base width with dig. calipers,divide by two, then use a ruler on top to find the center of the ski.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Got a line on a jig tomorrow! No more measuring worries!

I'll probably mount them 1 cm back since they aren't going to be used in any park.
post #10 of 13
I feel it appropriate to point out that there's a Fontaine on Fleabay now.
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
I feel it appropriate to point out that there's a Fontaine on Fleabay now.
COOL!! That's the belt sander we used, but it was blue, and I don't remember it having a side edge bevel attachment.
post #12 of 13
a couple of points
-what jig did you have that wouldn't fit a scratch FS? even old school solly jigs should fit if you take the rubber pads off the feet
-the scratch is more wood than "foam"
-if you used a fontaine you wrecked more skis than you fixed...
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman View Post
a couple of points
-what jig did you have that wouldn't fit a scratch FS? even old school solly jigs should fit if you take the rubber pads off the feet
-the scratch is more wood than "foam"
-if you used a fontaine you wrecked more skis than you fixed...
1. If you aren't standing in my shop helping me, than how would you know? :
An old one, maybe early 90's (it did have the Quadrax template), and trust me, even with the feet completely off, it wouldn't fit. Give me a little credit. : Jigs aren't rocket science, and if they don't fit, they don't fit. I tried everything - believe me. The Scratch FS is 84mm at the waist, an the Scratch BC is 98mm at the waist. This jig could probably handle mid-70's at the most.

2. Okay, but foam is foam. Unless it's ALL wood, than it's composite of some sort, and in my eyes not as durable for screwing and gluing. THC cores are not wood. When I drilled out the holes, white powder residue came out, not wood shavings.

3. Whatever. We did just fine with the Fontaine, and didn't wreck anything. (BTW - the one on eBay is just a belt sander, not a stone grinder, but we did use both.) I guess be trained properly and having a few skills can take a person a long way. YMMV. Criticize as you feel necessary. Again, if you aren't standing next to me while I'm doing my work, than you don't really have much to talk about.

Keep in mind I was a tech from 1995-1998. I don't know what else was out there at that time, nor does it matter. I did very good work and never had a complaint on my tunes, and I even took care of some (GASP!!) :...racers!!

Everything you've just pointed out is purely your "opinions". Any more "points" to make?
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