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Which Wax/Temperature?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Is there a rule of thumb as to choose which wax to use, rather to lean towards the colder version, say CH6 or to the warmer side CH7 if your not quite sure what the temp will be?

Just for plain old skiing.
post #2 of 16
Lean towards colder. ASFAIK it's better to err towards a harder wax even if it warms up or fluctuates during the day. There is large interest in broader range waxes and universals to minimize the guesswork.
HTH
post #3 of 16
If you are using Swix Hydrocarbon waxes for everyday skiing, just put on Blue and forget about it.

The other option is to use one of the borad temerature range waxes like swix universal.
post #4 of 16
Look at the mountain weather forecast for the next day and use that as a guide for determining what wax to use. Although racers measure actual snow temps, using the projected air temps works fine for choosing wax in non-racing situations. If it's a very close question, then I would go with those who advocate using the harder wax.
post #5 of 16
I use a decent quality universal wax ALL THE TIME. With the exception of those days when it's so cold you shouldn't be skiing anyway, I've done fine. I use Hertel and Dominator uni's.
post #6 of 16

Wax

If its not really cold: Example air temp below 15 degrees

I have in past used: Toko Universal, SWIX universal (white in color)

Now I use Maplus Universal, works great and lasts longer. Can use one of 3 ways: Melt on block hot wax - iron
Liquid, put on with paint brush, iron or not,scrape,brush,cork
Spray Liquid, cork

The Maplus you can use as described and works great, you can do it everyday on a trip and would take you about 5 mins to apply.

I use real c old stuff when it gets below 15 degrees up here like in Dec and January.

I have had no prob lems with universal Toki and Swix but sure like the
Maplus ease of application variables.
post #7 of 16
For just a single application lean colder, brush it out well, and consider adding a bit of fluoro, esp. if no wind.

Or if you have just one uni wax in the box, saturating the base with a couple of wax/scrape cycles works about as well.
post #8 of 16
Good point on the low fluoro. I'm tending to like it more and more (coupled with aggressive structuring) as we are moving into wetter & variable conditions with higher humidity. (FTR, the new Maplus universal sprays, creams & rub-ons contain low fluoro.)
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
I use a decent quality universal wax ALL THE TIME. With the exception of those days when it's so cold you shouldn't be skiing anyway....
Huh? Define what kind of day you "shouldn't be skiing"????? Haven't experienced that day yet.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Huh? Define what kind of day you "shouldn't be skiing"????? Haven't experienced that day yet.
LOL!! Well, when it's so cold that the snow turns to styrofoam - you can't even slide DOWN-hill, but you can walk UP-hill -- without skins!! :

Basically when it -15 to -20 WITHOUT the windchill. That was what the weather was like the day I certified Level 1 PSIA. I've never been so miserable skiing in my life. It's bad enough doing the level 1 stuff (seemed like we basically stood in one spot on the hill all day), but when it's THAT cols, and you wear boots with a racer fit...well...
post #11 of 16
I've been out in minus 25 PLUS a high wind and been fine. I just have to watch my face a bit and keep the neoprene over my face. I admit to having issues with my cold wax seeming not to have helped, but not consistently. I wear boot gloves and dress as if it's the Arctic, fashion be damned. Frankly, the last time it was really cold this year (a mere -15 F) I had so much gear on I was HOT.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
I've been out in minus 25 PLUS a high wind and been fine. I just have to watch my face a bit and keep the neoprene over my face. I admit to having issues with my cold wax seeming not to have helped, but not consistently. I wear boot gloves and dress as if it's the Arctic, fashion be damned. Frankly, the last time it was really cold this year (a mere -15 F) I had so much gear on I was HOT.
Not me!! : That's a bit too cold for me. My feet get cold in the 10's, and once that happens, it's all over. I should look into boot gloves though. Or heaters - my boots are Atomic M10's, which are supposed to be set up for those. I've frozen my toes & fingers a few times too many, so I don't care alot for extreme cold.

Yeah - when you're only the bunny hill in those temps, the best thing you can do is have NO wax at all. After the first day, that's what I did - bought a bunch of green Scotch pads, and scrubbed away.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
Yeah - when you're only the bunny hill in those temps, the best thing you can do is have NO wax at all. After the first day, that's what I did - bought a bunch of green Scotch pads, and scrubbed away.
Just keep 'em on edge. That kinda snow is really, really fun and I've invested in the full body down just for that.
post #14 of 16
I know this over simplifies things a lot, but I've been looking at this Average Snowpack Temp map from NOAA. Click on the region in question in the top image, and get a closer-up view from the image in the first row.

http://www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/nsa/
post #15 of 16
Interesting tool. Raises more issues than it settles (in a good way).
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
So I guess that's lean toward colder. Thanks!
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