or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Base edge polishing and deburring
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Base edge polishing and deburring

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
After setting the base edge with a progression of files how do you polish the base edge? One of the Holmenkol articles suggests freehanding a gummi stone up and down the base edge. Another one of the Holmenkol articles suggests polishing with a Arkansas or other ceramic stone (doesn't mention using file guide or freehand). Heluvaskier in the sticky Tuning FAQ thread suggests using a progression of diamond files with the base edge file guide if there are still burrs on the base edge. So what are others doing? Freehand or file guides? Diamond stones, Arkansas stone or gummi stone?

And, how do you polish and debur the base edge after a day of skiing? I've read some doing it with an edge file guide and a progression of diamond stones and others freehand with a gummi, diamond or Arkansas stone. What are the pros and cons of each technique?
post #2 of 9

See the following...

...where the operative concept is "Don't hit rocks!" Yeah, but when we do, I either free hand it or use the technique of progressive passes with diamond stones using a base bevel guide if the damage is serious enough...

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf
post #3 of 9
I tune/polish edges along with base wax after each outing. There is always some deterioration of a once fine edge that can be addressed. For me the amount of time I have to allocate for tuning dictates the tools and methods I use as well as there is no substitute for experience and developed skills. In particular, freehand stone use for deburr and polish is my preferred method with a touch and patience of a jeweler. Depending on edge condition, I progress from light file if necessary then to stone(s) and then to a deft gummy touch. I have a series of stones I use that move towards the fine polish and condition I’m seeking. My freehand technique incorporates the feedback of how a stone “feels” and “sounds” with each subsequent pass of each finer stone grade, something diamonds do not provide me. A jeweler’s loop and a finger pass confirm the accuracy. While I find that diamonds do not provide me the best outcome stones do they will make quick work of it in a guide. Also, diamonds (200, 400, 600 grit) pack light for slope side work of damage and used cautiously freehand result in day saving fixes.

Good Skiing!
post #4 of 9
I use a very fine shallow tooth file to set inital base bevel. I then polish the base edge with a hard gummi, as the Homenkol article mentions.

For maintaining, I never touch the base edge again. All filing, diamond stoning & polishing is done on the side edge only, except to remove any hanging burr created from polishing the side edge. I freehand the base edge with a very hard gummi or arkansas stone. This is not a polishing action just a pass from tip to tail or tail to tip with medium pressure with the stone pressed flat against the base edge to remove the micro curl or hanging burr.
post #5 of 9
I've never had a burr on the base edge, how could you(unless you hit a rock). After every day of skiing I use a pocket tuner with a stone to de-burr. Works perfectly. Infact I used to be obsessed about keeping my skis sharp and tuned. Now I very rarely tune because I'm able to maintain my edges.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
I use a very fine shallow tooth file to set inital base bevel. I then polish the base edge with a hard gummi, as the Homenkol article mentions.

For maintaining, I never touch the base edge again. All filing, diamond stoning & polishing is done on the side edge only, except to remove any hanging burr created from polishing the side edge. I freehand the base edge with a very hard gummi or arkansas stone. This is not a polishing action just a pass from tip to tail or tail to tip with medium pressure with the stone pressed flat against the base edge to remove the micro curl or hanging burr.
Doesn't this mean that your base edge is full of nicks and dings from sliding over rocks, twigs, etc. ? Surely running over the base edge with a bevel guide and something like an alu-oxide stone doesn't increase the base bevel ?

Having said this, all guides I see say all maintenenace tuning should be to the side edge only.
post #7 of 9
I see it as a judgment call. If the base edges are rough enough, I'll try to minimally polish them down. Nicks are less of a functional issue than an aesthetic one, compared to burrs and dullness. Try the side edges first and see how goes.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I see it as a judgment call.
That's the gotcha for all these base-edge/freehand-or-guide discussions. It's all in experience with the feel and the sound.

The best guideline is that if you have to ask, you should a) not touch your base edge and/or b) use a file guide for your side edge.
post #9 of 9

Here you go.  Polishing base edge.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Base edge polishing and deburring