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Do I need to lube the binding?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Do I need to lube the binding for storage and regular maintenance?
If so, what's recommended to use?
When they came from the factory they had some kind of waterproof grease on them (a bit like vaseline but not).
Also, I have some silicone spray which dries leaving no residue. Could I use this?
post #2 of 18
I'd wait for some confirmation from someone else, but generic Vaseline would likely do the trick.. it's cheap and will hold back the moisture.

Any kind of Grease should work.
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Do I need to lube the binding?
No.
post #4 of 18
no it should basicaly stay lubricated throught the factory lubrication that they apply.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post
When they came from the factory they had some kind of waterproof grease on them (a bit like vaseline but not).
Only on the brake spring and internals not normally visible during use, I hope and trust.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Where I could see it was on the ski brake. I couldn't see anything else.
I guess all I'm worried about ios some of the screws/metal parts rusting...
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post
I guess all I'm worried about ios some of the screws/metal parts rusting...
Don't worry about it; it really only happens at the mounting screws if they are not glued down properly and trap moisture.
post #8 of 18
Yes, absolutley!!!

The internals of your bindings generally do not need lubriaction. Although any external hinges (heel) rollers (toe) or pivot points (toe/heel) should be lubed. If you ski on a binding with any type of track system where the toe or particularly the heel slides in a track you need to lubricate the track.

Like ah? Atomic

Marker

Tyrolia

Almost all bindings have some degree of freeflex in the heel at a minimum nowadays and the heel must move freely and smoothly in it's track when the ski is flexed into an arc.

http://www.holmenkol.us/cartproducts...ding&ref=41 5
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have a Tyrolia railflex binding so I'm sure the track needs lubing then.
Don't you have to take the binding off the track to do this?
Also, how often do you need to lube it up? Or do you just do it at the end of the season for storage?

Secondly, will a silicone spray do the same job as a specific binding lubricant ?
post #10 of 18
Although it is probably better to take the heel out of track to lube, None of the components forma "seal" with the track. if you spray in under and around the heel, the spray will find it's way under the heel and onto the track.

As far as silicone spray, I don't know what the water soluble properties or freezing properties are. I would check that out.

I hae used the Holmnkol spray and it seems to work very well.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
As far as silicone spray, I don't know what the water soluble properties or freezing properties are. I would check that out.
+ dirt repellency
+ adhesion to various materials
+ UV stability

Don't void your warranty.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
I don't intend to void the warranty and...

I'm sure the proper binding spray isn't that much difference in price. However, I'm just trying to find out what it contains exactly.
As far as I can tell, silicone spray is decent - it is designed for plactics, metal, wood, repells dirt, lubricates, etc.
I can't really see how someone could manufacture something that much different to something of the WD40 maufacturing giant, which produces WD40, lithium grease, silicone spray, etc.

I appreciate that certain products are sold to certain markets but there must be similar/substitute products that do the job just as easily ?

I mean...what exactly makes up the ingredients of binding spray causing it to be so different from other "lubricating" products?
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post
I don't intend to void the warranty and...

I'm sure the proper binding spray isn't that much difference in price. However, I'm just trying to find out what it contains exactly.
As far as I can tell, silicone spray is decent - it is designed for plactics, metal, wood, repells dirt, lubricates, etc.
I can't really see how someone could manufacture something that much different to something of the WD40 maufacturing giant, which produces WD40, lithium grease, silicone spray, etc.

I appreciate that certain products are sold to certain markets but there must be similar/substitute products that do the job just as easily ?

I mean...what exactly makes up the ingredients of binding spray causing it to be so different from other "lubricating" products?
I have a can of WD 40, Holmenkol binding Spray and some food grade silicone spray.

I'll see what i can come up with!
post #14 of 18
Salomon, Atomic, and Look/Rossi all call for greasing the heel tracks and mechanical AFD's when applicable. Each manufacturer also has their own grease (with part numbers) though I'd suspect it's all the same. Regardless, binding grease is rather thick stuff and quite different than the silicon spray that comes out of a can.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
I have a can of WD 40....
I read that WD 40 is not a lubricant; it is a water repellant to force water out of/off something, i.e. ignition wires. A coat of WD 40 does work to keep water off, but does not lubricate.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by NE1 View Post
I read that WD 40 is not a lubricant; it is a water repellant to force water out of/off something, i.e. ignition wires. A coat of WD 40 does work to keep water off, but does not lubricate.
I wasn't recommending using it, was just going to give him any listed ingredients so he could compare with Silicone & Binding Spray!
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by NE1 View Post
I read that WD 40 is not a lubricant; it is a water repellant to force water out of/off something, i.e. ignition wires. A coat of WD 40 does work to keep water off, but does not lubricate.
Tell that to my butt, which I fell on after slipping on some overspray of WD40 when I was lubing door hinges in my house.
It sure makes hinges (and floors) slippery! I'm not saying it's entirely appropriate for bindings, but I too would like to know what's different about binding sprays...
post #18 of 18
WD-40 is a solvent, not a lubricant. It's 50% mineral spirits with a little bit of regular mineral oil in it. Yes, it's slippery, but it's not a good lubricant at all.
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