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Sweet Helmet Semi-Review

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I ordered a Sweet Helmet online, after studying the various options out there. As a long time motorcycle rider, pay serious attention to materials and design rationale. Sweet seemed as good as POC, with a better selection of designs and colors. They have a strong reputation for their kayaking helmets, fairly new to skiing. W also was in the running; the more common brands didn't offer what I was looking for. Unfortunately, no Sweet distribution stateside, so this was blind.

Predictably, Sweet only had white and black still available this season in this model. Ordered Industrial White. Folks were very helpful about measurements etc. At the price ($268), they should be. Helmet arrived just before my trip to Whistler (see Prior review below).

Verdict: Good build quality, nice adjustability, obviously hand made in small runs, snug fit. Too snug in fact. They seem to run small (I have a 58 cm head, long and narrow; comes out as their M/L, but the forehead pressure warned me of a headache.) My wife, who has the same circumference but totally different head shape (round and wide), also found a good snug fit but some pressure over the sides. No ventilation in this model, but I tend to ski in fairly cold conditions anyway, so not an issue.

So ironically, I left it home, unused. Will return it, possibly for a bigger size, although the mold may just not be right for my noggin and I'll end up with a POC. I'll report back.
post #2 of 26
Which model did you get? Trooper or Rooster? I have both, and they are a bit different in shape. The Rooster seems to fit a round head shape better, while the Trooper seems a bit more oval.

Another thing; Did the helmet come with fit-pads, or were they pre-installed? They can make quite a difference on how the helmet will fit. They may also take a few hours to mold themselves after your head shape.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
I got the Rooster; it was too tight front to back for any fit pads, lateral fit was about perfect without. Your info is interesting; I might look again at the Trooper.
post #4 of 26

Rooster versus Trooper

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorSkier View Post
Which model did you get? Trooper or Rooster? I have both, and they are a bit different in shape. The Rooster seems to fit a round head shape better, while the Trooper seems a bit more oval.
Hva er egentlig fordelen med å kjøpe Rooster i stedet for Trooper (botsett fra eventuelle problemer knyttet til hodefasong)? Rooster er jo 600 kroner dyrere, så det må da være noe som er bedre med den.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hi Fantomet - Since you appear to understand English from your quote, any way you could translate your comment?
post #6 of 26
I got a carbon rooster in L/XL as I run a size 61 head. I found it pretty firm for the first few days but it now fits, a closer fit than my Giro G10 but much lower profile. THe one problem I have is with the Skullcandy sound pads which do not have a plug into one of the ear pieces like Tuneups do. I am sure that some sound geeks will tell me that this allows better sound quality but quite frankly as a normal skier I take my helmet off for breaks and lunch and having to pull all the wiring out of my jacket is a right pain.

Good helmet, silly sound system, and before you fun police start on about listening to music whilst skiing blah blah blah, I use it on the lifts only.

It may be worth you persevering with the helmet for a bit, but sometimes a mold just will not fit a certain shaped head.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fantomet View Post
Hva er egentlig fordelen med å kjøpe Rooster i stedet for Trooper (botsett fra eventuelle problemer knyttet til hodefasong)? Rooster er jo 600 kroner dyrere, så det må da være noe som er bedre med den.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Translated:
What is the reason for buying the Rooster instead of the Trooper besides fit/head shape issues, as the price difference is quite significant.
The Rooster is lighter, some 350 grams vs 500 for the Trooper. Full carbonfiber shell. Some like the design better...


To me the fit was the deciding factor. I've a big head, even in the largest size the Rooster felt more like it was on top of my head than around it. Another thing is that the Rooster can only be had with removeable earpads (like alot of todays 'freeride' helmets), while the Trooper has a fullcut version with the shell covering your ears as well.


The only negative aspect with the Trooper so far for me has been the helmet strap: After only a few days (4-5) use, the rubber in the strap is too flexible. When you want to open the strap to remove/attach goggles, the rubber just slips over the button. To secure the goggles you need to get a grip on the strap and stretch it back over the button.

It's an easy warranty issue, but because of the high demand for these helmets you can't get it fixed without some waiting, so I'll live with the small hassle for the rest of this season. I've heard of a few others also having this problem, but most don't, so it could be just a small batch that has the bad rubber.
post #8 of 26
torfinn, are u saying that the rubber issue makes it hard to to secure the goggle, i.e., that the strap becomes unsnapped too easily?

Its definitely a warranty issue though - their customer service is great. There's still a demand/supply issue but it seems like its not as bad as last season.
post #9 of 26
No, securing the goggle is not an issue. It's just bit less convenient when you are want to remove/attach the goggles. I've not had the strap open on itself.

I emailed them after I wrote that post btw, got a reply the same night. Apparently it's a 1 hour job to replace the strap. If I went to their hq they would do it while I wait, but it's a 2 hour drive from here so I'll wait until after the season. If I mail it I'd probably be without my helmet for 6 days, so thats not really an option either
post #10 of 26
Can someone with a M/L or XL Rooster please measure the inside front-to-back? I have a long+narrow 59cm head and nobody down here has one i can try on before buying. I plan on using it for Kiteboarding. Andrew R?
Also were is everyone buying their Sweet Roosters?
Much appreciated!
post #11 of 26
Where did you find the Sweet helmets? :
Thanks
post #12 of 26
Coloradofreeskier has some, but only rooster and trooper fullcuts are left:
http://www.coloradofreeskier.com

You could also order from a shop in the EU, such as:
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/acti...ts/SWE0013.htm

Or you can order one direct from the company (which is what I did), by emailing:
north-america@sweetprotection.com
post #13 of 26

rooster

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowTiger View Post
Can someone with a M/L or XL Rooster please measure the inside front-to-back? I have a long+narrow 59cm head and nobody down here has one i can try on before buying. I plan on using it for Kiteboarding. Andrew R?
Also were is everyone buying their Sweet Roosters?
Much appreciated!
My m/l is 21cm front to back.
I had a couple of hotspots on the back of my skull.
I compressed the padding a mm or 2 on those spots and after that it fits perfectly.

-peace
/k
post #14 of 26
Thanks Blue! Looks like it's too late for this season, but I'll order one next season.
post #15 of 26
Just happened on this forum while surfing for ski reviews. Thanks for the kind words about our products! I'll skip the commercial, but here's a little info. We've actually been distributing in the US and Canada since 2003. It's just that we're a small company, partnered with a limited network of core retailers. Our office is at the base of Mount Hood (Oregon), with company headquarters in Trysil Norway. There are currently issues with our website shop locator, but we're working on it. We're glad to answer emails and make dealer referrals; just drop us a line.

Proper fit is key for both safety and comfort, so our entire line is designed for personal customization. Sizing is CE standard, although admittedly slightly smaller than some brands. Head shapes vary quite a bit, so the size charts are just a basic guideline. For warranties/etc., let us know and we'll definitely make it right. And the soundpads are getting an upgrade for next season, with exactly the feature mentioned in this thread (and more...)

So here's the shameless plug - based on personal experience. Please consider wearing a good helmet, regardless of whether it's one of ours. Brain injuries are life changing, and happen more commonly than most people realize. Next to car wrecks, sports accidents are the #2 cause.

Best regards,

Brian
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet North America View Post
Just happened on this forum while surfing for ski reviews. Thanks for the kind words about our products! I'll skip the commercial, but here's a little info. We've actually been distributing in the US and Canada since 2003. It's just that we're a small company, partnered with a limited network of core retailers. Our office is at the base of Mount Hood (Oregon), with company headquarters in Trysil Norway. There are currently issues with our website shop locator, but we're working on it. We're glad to answer emails and make dealer referrals; just drop us a line.

Proper fit is key for both safety and comfort, so our entire line is designed for personal customization. Sizing is CE standard, although admittedly slightly smaller than some brands. Head shapes vary quite a bit, so the size charts are just a basic guideline. For warranties/etc., let us know and we'll definitely make it right. And the soundpads are getting an upgrade for next season, with exactly the feature mentioned in this thread (and more...)

So here's the shameless plug - based on personal experience. Please consider wearing a good helmet, regardless of whether it's one of ours. Brain injuries are life changing, and happen more commonly than most people realize. Next to car wrecks, sports accidents are the #2 cause.

Best regards,

Brian
Brian - Sent you a PM re: dealers. Thanks!
post #17 of 26
I would not wear a skiing helmet with a shell material as rigid as carbon fiber.

I would not wear a motorcycle helmet with a shell material as rigid as carbon fiber, either.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnythan View Post
I would not wear a skiing helmet with a shell material as rigid as carbon fiber.

I would not wear a motorcycle helmet with a shell material as rigid as carbon fiber, either.
Why?
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kestner9 View Post
Why?
Well it's just totally not necessary.

First you have to understand how helmets protect your head. The lightweight foam inside of the helmet is designed to crush like the crumple zone of a car. The crushing action of the foam is what absorbs the energy from the impact of your head to the ground, a rock, a tree, whatever. The exterior of the helmet is really just there to provide some puncture and abrasion resistance to the foam inside.

A large motorcycle magazine did a very extensive test of a variety of motorcycle helmets. It turned out that the helmets with regular plastic shells impart lower forces to the head than helmets with very stiff fiberglass or carbon fiber shells - even in very high energy impacts (such as hitting a car bumper at 120mph). The reasons for this are intuitively obvious once you're told why. The dense foam inside the helmet does a much better job of softening impact forces than the shell, and the more energy it takes to deform/break the shell, the less energy absorbed by the foam.

IMO the same will be true - even more so - for snowsports helmets where the speeds involved are considerably lower. I want a helmet that will absorb as much of the impact as possible through crushing of the foam. I don't want a helmet that will *not* deform, *not* let the foam crush, and instead impart the maximum amount of force on my head.
post #20 of 26
That's an intersting analysis. The Sweet helmets do have a tough carbon fiber exterior. However, I will say that the the interior of my Trooper has a nice foam matetial (not completely rigid yet not soft) that I think would collapse/absorb nicely under heavy impact. Luckily, I haven't had the misfortune of testing this hypothesis.

Also, I seem to recall that the exterior isn't just caribon fiber. I think its a meld of different types of materials. There's also a lower shell that's made of something entirely different that is also supposed to help disperse the force of the impact.

That said, not sure how much of this is marketing versus reality...
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
If you look into the design of helmets - and I owned motorcycles for 30 years - you'll find that a stiff shell is NOT for impact absorption but for preventing objects like steel guard rails or light poles from penetrating your skull. The foam on the inside is for impact absorption. And not all foam is equal; EPS is the most common (read cheap, as in Styrofoam) but it's comparatively brittle (cracks to absorb), sends a lot of force to your head. EPP and other deformable foams, now used by several companies, does a better job of reducing net force to head and skull bounce.

In general, if the design uses a stiffer shell for penetration protection, you'll want more attention to softer, more deformable foams on the inside to prevent bounce. If the design uses a thinner, more crushable shell, like most recreational "in-mold" ski or bicycle helmets, then you can get away with stiff foam. But one decent impact and an in-mold helmet has lost some/much of its protection, even if you can't see any damage. So a lot of folks who have taken a bad spill and keep using their helmet are fooling themselves...

It's not all marketing hype, which is why POC (which uses chain mail or kevlar below ABS to prevent penetration and several types of foam to prevent bounce) is used by so many elite racers. W helmets and Sweet Helmets both use EPP, and Sweet also uses carbon. A lot of mainstream companies (Boeri, Giro) are starting to use some ABS in parts of the shell, and any racing helmet worth its salt uses ABS at the minimum, often Kevlar.
post #22 of 26
I found Sweets at a kayak shop out here in the Bay Area. they actually had the "snow" models in stock, not the kayak ones! I think (and Brian from Sweet might want to chime in) that the kayak and snow models are pretty much the same helmet except for color options.

I still haven't plunked down as I haven't had the time to seriously try them on at the shop this season (it's across the Bay from where I am), but Brian and the rest of the Sweet customer service team are great about answering emails and helping you locate a dealer and answering any other questions you may have.
post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Followup on customer service - I returned my Rooster unused, they were gracious, offered either full refund or credit. (Trying to decide, probably will go with credit.) So another one of these small companies that offers competitive products and great service, but limited chance to demo. That's the tradeoff, I guess.
post #24 of 26
Worth looking at the Sweet website but the Rooster is Carbon with an ABS(?) neck cuff. The carbon is light and for the prevention of entry of rocks etc. The neck cuff provides a less rigid (ie more forgiving )protection to the C spine area and the foam liner is what provides the impact absorbtion.

Like any helmet it should be replaced after any serious impact. I am not sure what Sweet's crash replacement/ R&D policy is. Giro advertise one but do not reply to emails so it is not very useful.

In short my helmet is light, low profile (ie less in one's perifieral vision - important in trees), highly rated (crash/ impact standards) and comfortable (try 6 hours per day every day in one). On top of all that it looks so cool I haven't even put one sticker on it!!!

I hope the next sound pads have the detachable lead - I haven't used mine so may send them back.
A spring version of the Rooster with some air vents would be nice to have too.

I agree with the other posts - you only have one head and brain and it only takes one d*&^head dropping onto a run or ollying a piste transition (or dropping in from a cornice), without looking or shouting a warning, to have you playing 'pacman' through an air tube for the rest of your life. There is no such thing as spending too much to have something light and comfortable to protect your head for 6-8 hours per day for 220 days of the year as far as I am concerned.
post #25 of 26
Looking at a Sweet Rooster just now, head measures 54.5cm, obvious choice is Medium but it is quite close to the bridge between the two sizes. Anyone else have anything further to add on comparative sizing between the helmet and their head 'measurement'?

Thanks
post #26 of 26
Hello SWEET North America. I've sentyou a PM. Please read and get back to me ASAP.
Thanks
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