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Ski pole weight and impact to skiing?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm using a set of poles which are approximately 2x older than my oldest child (the poles are 18yo). They're also pretty heavy compared to even aluminum poles that I've picked up in ski shops. The grips are starting to crack, so it's time to get some new poles. I know that there's quite a bit of difference in weight across different poles today. What I'm wondering is does this have any impact to skiing? Will a lighter swing weight help or is there little impact?

Thanks!
post #2 of 19
There are some inexpensive Goode Jr. poles. Grip size is important too.
post #3 of 19
I have always felt that the secret to skiing is your hands. If they are not in the right place at the right time then your shoulder it off, so your hip is off and your weight is off where it should be. Heavy unbalanced poles can be a hinderace to good skiing, especially in moguls. Light poles are nice but you don't need super light. I think the most important factor is a comfortable grip that fits your hand and allows you to easily flick the (hopefully balanced) pole forward or back. Baskets usually come in the small (lighter) hard snow type, or the bigger powder baskets. Unless you ski a lot of deep snow I would reccomend going with the lighter smaller ones. If the poles do not come with two sets of baskets ask to switch them out when you buy the poles if they are not the ones you want.
post #4 of 19
I found a huge difference in switching poles a couple of years ago. I went from heavy aluminium poles to first scott grafite poles and finally Goode carbon poles.
Not only are they more comfortable, they are easier on your body. You don’t realize until you change to something light, but swinging and flicking those poles all day tires out your shoulders. Thecarbon poles don’t! It’s also easier to have your hands up in the right position.
post #5 of 19
I never thought poles had much to do with anything until I got a pair of light, flexible ones for $7 at a ski swap (the most I've ever spent on poles). They're Kermas and are not aluminum, but I don't know what they're made of. It really made a difference in my comfort.
post #6 of 19
It doesn't seem like it should make much difference but I really like my graphite poles. They're lighter and whippier (if that's a word) and just feel better to ski with.
post #7 of 19
Get a set of the Leki Trigger poles. Thin aluminum for the top half, carbon for the bottom, center of gravity is closer to your hand. The poles darned near swing themselves. Plus the trigger is handy.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Anybody have any experience with the lower-end composite poles from Goode or K2 that cost between $30-50? How do they compare weight- and strength- wise to aluminum poles?
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by f2racer View Post
Anybody have any experience with the lower-end composite poles from Goode or K2 that cost between $30-50? How do they compare weight- and strength- wise to aluminum poles?
They are better, but IMHO the 10mm (+/-) shafted poles ARE worth the difference.
post #10 of 19
Goode poles =

You can find the 8601 series of Goode poles for less than $50, and they are supposed to be considerably better than the lower end Goode poles (and MUCH better than aluminum). I bought a pair and the difference between carbon/graphite to aluminum is amazing. I'll never own aluminum poles again. I think they say that the composite poles weigh ~1/3 less than alum. ones
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by f2racer View Post
Anybody have any experience with the lower-end composite poles from Goode or K2 that cost between $30-50? How do they compare weight- and strength- wise to aluminum poles?
I picked up a pair of the K2 poles ($40) one day when I forgot my Excel graphite poles *and* my old backup aluminum poles (I had no poles in the car at all!!). The K2s are fairly good, but they are a larger diameter than the graphite poles and less rigid. When I have to pole around, I notice they have a tendency to buckle sometimes. Despite being skinnier, the graphite poles are a lot more rigid -- I don't ever remember feeling them buckle at all. I think I paid about $90 for the graphite poles back in 1995 or so, and they are still going strong. They have outlasted at least 10 pairs of skis and a couple pairs of boots...
post #12 of 19
Anyone had/have a bad habit of telegraphing pole plants way ahead of time after yonks of skiing with the heavy ones?
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
I went ahead and bought a set of K2 4 Speeds. Princeton Outlet had them on sale... They weigh approximately 2/3rds of what my ancient Kerma Al poles weigh, and are about 2/3 the diameter at the grip and almost 1/2 the diamter at the basket. Haven't skied with them yet, will likely do so this week...

After I bought them I read that the 4 Speeds are mainly fiberglass, opposed to their higher end 5 and 6 speeds that have more composite (I'm guessing carbon/graphite) material. Hopefully they aren't noodles, the Kerma's I have are stiff as hell.
post #14 of 19
Modern aluminum poles are much lighter than the old metal poles and in my opinion better than a lot of alternative constructions because they are stiffer than many (though not all) of the carbon/graphite/composites. Yet, to each his own.
post #15 of 19
Poles will make or break your skiing. A year ago I was a complete gaper using plain old aluminum poles. Then I got a pair of poles custom made by a Bavarian engineer. They are triaxially braided boron wrapped around an ultra-light titanium core. The grips have 5 different densities of rubber and are custom molded to my hands. The strap system is composed of a complicated sterling silver clip device which locks into a pair of special gloves made from Himalayan goat skin. Now, thanks to my new poles, I'm a Level 50 Super Rockstar.

Poles only make a difference if you think they do.
post #16 of 19
By:Jer "...They are triaxially braided boron wrapped around an ultra-light titanium core... The strap system is composed of a complicated sterling silver clip device which locks into a pair of special gloves made from Himalayan goat skin... "

That's old technology and so passé.
post #17 of 19
The best poles are the plain silver finish aluminum Circa 1980. Ya know, the kind with the molded on pole "strap"so you can hang em on the chairlift bar? And white plastic baskets...Spray painted black or flourescent yellow if possible. Also at least one G-spot bend that has been manually repaired via knee and hands. Little duct tape is cool.

Serioulsy. As long as they are long enough to launch out of the gate, who cares? Nicer poles just scream - "steal me." If 12 Oz poles are a cause of undue fatigue - hit the weights pencil neck! Hmmmm...Beer 12 oz. Pole 12 oz...! coincidence? All part of Cheney and the Bene Gesseritt's insane plan.

Though I admit,I secretly covet some ultra slim carbons, just get some cheap ones that match your parka.
post #18 of 19

Unforeseen problems at DIN 8.5 +

Anyone bent a medium-zoot pencilcarbon pole without being able to release the heel of the binding?
post #19 of 19
Please do not use the words ski-pole and impact in the same sentence.
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