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Head 1400 and 88mm Powder Ski...Acceptable 2 ski quiver?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've been looking high and low for a one ski do-it-all swiss army knife ski. Although there are some great options out there my list keeps growing and growing. So I got thinking about a 2 ski quiver, which may be within my budget considering I found a pair of Head I.XRC 1400's for under $400. So my question is, would I have the start of a respectable quiver if I went with the Head 1400's and a powder ski like the Head im88 or Atomic Snoop Daddy?

Thanks in advance for your replies!
post #2 of 13
Magnus
If you have a race carver/ski cross ski and a fat ski you don't need any other skis. Except maybe a pair of scottish skis (rock skis). That's about the perfect set up 1 pair hard snow and 1 pair soft snow skis. If you are a really strong skier you could ski on just the Head XRC. A lot of my Race coach friends have race slaloms that they ski everywhere on the mountain. The Fat skis just make powder days less tiring.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordtheBarbarian View Post
Magnus
If you have a race carver/ski cross ski and a fat ski you don't need any other skis. Except maybe a pair of scottish skis (rock skis). That's about the perfect set up 1 pair hard snow and 1 pair soft snow skis. If you are a really strong skier you could ski on just the Head XRC. A lot of my Race coach friends have race slaloms that they ski everywhere on the mountain. The Fat skis just make powder days less tiring.
Thanks Nord. I've been skiing on carver skis that I will grandfather in as scottish skis. I've had enough time stuggling on them in powder to know that a dedicated pair of soft snow skis is just what the doctor ordered!
post #4 of 13
I keep costs down by buying a new primary ski (my Contact 11) and my other skis are purchased in good but used condition.

Most people spend 75% of their time skiing a primary pair and use the alternate ski(s) under special conditions. Why buy two or more new pair and incur the cost on skis that are essentially back-up?

Michael
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv View Post
I keep costs down by buying a new primary ski (my Contact 11) and my other skis are purchased in good but used condition.

Most people spend 75% of their time skiing a primary pair and use the alternate ski(s) under special conditions. Why buy two or more new pair and incur the cost on skis that are essentially back-up?

Michael
Thanks Michael. Your recommendation to buy a used pair of back-up skis is appreciated.

Under what conditions do you break out something other than your Contact 11's? What is your rotation like?
post #6 of 13
Heck, I'm a big fan of scoping out 'lightly used' skis for primary too... Unless you are buying race skis, a little cosmetic damage and some small scratches on the base won't matter one bit, especially if you can save a boatload of money.

The only skis I bought new were my Salomon 720 because I've seen some used twin tips and would rather not deal with something that's been beat on THAT much.... plus I got a good deal. If I could find them used in good condition I would have bought them used.

My quiver:
K2 Four R @ 153 - Got them used for $10 - I use them for teaching and to use as beater skis... rocks? grass? mud? branches? no problem!
K2 Escape 5500 @ 160 - Got them used for $70 - when purchased, bases and topsheet were in very good condition - I use them for ice and hard pack
Salomon 720 @ 151 - new for $350 - Went with short length for lighter weight and because I either wanted snowblades or twin tips, so to compromise I bought short twin tips - I use them for powder, soft snow, and park.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnus_CA View Post
Thanks Michael. Your recommendation to buy a used pair of back-up skis is appreciated.

Under what conditions do you break out something other than your Contact 11's? What is your rotation like?
I use the Contact 11's (122-72-102mm) for all my icy, hardpack and boot-top deep snow days. This represents about 75% of my skiing time, even in places like Snowbird. I then use my Dynastar Inspired by Nobis (I have about $200 in these) with a 117-89-110 sidecut; these are good on soft & deep days, one or two days after a healthy snowfall. I have the Spatulas for really deep days, I'll probably only use these a few days a year, mostly for cat or heli skiing. I have a total of $1200 in these three pairs. The Contact 11's were used a few days at a dealer event, so the price was right.

Cheers,

Michael
post #8 of 13
You have a great quiver suggestion there! 2 skis should be enough for anyone but the most diehard gearhead (which would descibe many of us hanging out here on the forum!). If I could have two skis, they would be

1) Mid-radius top end carver for hard snow and variable condition days. Something stable and energetic. Examples: iXRC 1200/1400, Supershape, Contact 11, Mach 3/Power, Speedwave, RIPstick, RX8 ect. These skis will rip up any frontside condition and be very versatile, as well as stable while up on edge, not to mention full of energy. They can be great 1-ski quiver models for skiers East of the Mississippi.

2) Versatile wider ski for crud and new snow days. 85-95mm underfoot. Examples: iM88, Mantra, 777/888, Snoop Daddy, Legend 8800/Mythic Rider.

I also have a 3rd ski to compliment the quiver (yep, I am a gear head) and that is a full race stock GS with soft plate (in my case, Elan GSX 182cm). This is a useful ski for hitting 45mph+ on spring early-morning, midweek days when all of 10 people are on the hill. Obviously, not a lot of people are going to need a ski a full GS race ski, especially if they ski in crowded conditions or on a small hill. I am also not a big fan of super-wide 100mm plus skis, as I feel that I am just skimming across a groomer, whereas on 85mm skis, I am in the snow (not buried) but still getting the feeling of powder skiing, up and down, floating non-gravity movements. Maybe if I was to take a heli-skiing trip to Alaska I might feel differently, but for typical PNW conditions, 85-90mm is about as wide as I want to ski.

As always, YMMV.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
I also have a 3rd ski to compliment the quiver (yep, I am a gear head) and that is a full race stock GS with soft plate (in my case, Elan GSX 182cm). This is a useful ski for hitting 45mph+ on spring early-morning, midweek days when all of 10 people are on the hill. Obviously, not a lot of people are going to need a ski a full GS race ski, especially if they ski in crowded conditions or on a small hill. I am also not a big fan of super-wide 100mm plus skis, as I feel that I am just skimming across a groomer, whereas on 85mm skis, I am in the snow (not buried) but still getting the feeling of powder skiing, up and down, floating non-gravity movements. Maybe if I was to take a heli-skiing trip to Alaska I might feel differently, but for typical PNW conditions, 85-90mm is about as wide as I want to ski.

Yea but your like 150lbs right? For a bigger guy 100mm+ underfoot is not super wide.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Yea but your like 150lbs right? For a bigger guy 100mm+ underfoot is not super wide.
I'm 225 plus and I follow the same formula as Dawgcatching. My GS ski is a Fischer WC RC (a little more tame than his Elan).
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
Yea but your like 150lbs right? For a bigger guy 100mm+ underfoot is not super wide.
It depends on your perspective and how much float you need locally. The two other guys that work at the shop both are 190-200lbs and are skiing either the iM88 or 777 in new snow. A bigger skier who is taller may have some of the weight issue alleviated by the longer skis he would use. If the skier is much heavier, then they would likely benefit from a wider ski in deep snow, or if they skied at a mountain with that dumped tons of heavy snow.

At our local mountain, super-wide skis don't make that much sense, as we rarely get tons of deep snow, and new snow turns to crud really quickly. The really wide skis I have tried have been nice in uncut snow, but not that stable in mixed conditions, which is what you see at Bachelor on most days. We get alot of 3-8" snow days, and fresh snow (not this season though) is the norm 4 out of 7 winter days. 88mm underfoot seems to be the standard on new snow days: I rarely see anyone on something wider. It allows the skier to cut up first tracks, then ski crud for a few hours, and end the day on rough groomers at speed. For my weight, 78mm skis underfoot do the trick in nearly any snow depth, but I enjoy the increased turn radius of the slightly wider skis for pure crudbusting. Many of the people around here who buy 100mm+ are using them for AT setups in the backcountry.
post #12 of 13
I'm like 5'10" 215lbs. I have the B5 172CM and 188CM Nordica Beasts (124-92-116) right now. I am moving to Ut for next season. I actually like the beasts here in the midatlantic. Pretty crazy sounding, but if the edges are sharp, they are good enough on ice. They flap a little at high speed but if I edge them they quiet down. And they are super stable on any snow conditions. They are even good in moguls provided its not too deeply rutted. I am going to convert the beasts to an AT setup when I get to UT. I was thinking about getting something even fatter and heavier and stiffer for everyday use in UT. But then I hear about 150lb kids using Armada Ants in 191 out there and I'm like shoot I need big daddies or something.
post #13 of 13
I agree with everyone. an all-mountaln carver and a 90mm powder/crud ski and done. I do want some Gotamas though...
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Head 1400 and 88mm Powder Ski...Acceptable 2 ski quiver?