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Too Many Skis?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to have too many skis?

I realize this question is nothing short of sacrilege (check-out the endless posts to "How Big is Your Quiver").

Like many, I've fallen prey to the lure of having "the right ski for each condition". Without planning, I've accumulated 5 new pairs of skis in the past 2 years (Sugar Daddy, M:EX, M:B5, M:9, IZOR 9:7).

Yet, as I now load up the car (or ski-bag for flights), I find myself paralyzed by choice.

Whatever I choose, I know there's a good chance I'll regret not having another ski on a given day. It's like betting in Vegas, you inevitably make the wrong choice and lose.

I love each pair for their unique attributes, yet realize that just loading 'em all isn't going to work. Quivers are fun, but less manageable than a set of golf-clubs.

I've also discovered I must "re-dial" my technique slightly for each ski. Life's suddenly become complex.

I find myself reminiscing over simpler days, when I simply had "my skis", and learned to use them in all conditions.

Is it possible to have too much of a good thing?
post #2 of 22
Too many skis? Thats just crazy talk and i won't have it here.


You mention golf? Golfers are allowed 14 clubs in their bag...with each club having a specific purpose. So, using this thinking 14 should be the optimum amount of skis in a quiver. Now, i said optimum..not too many
post #3 of 22
You have choices and I would like to suggest you exercise them:

A. Start back on the medication.

B. Do not stop, do not pass go.

C. Report immediately to .. www.skilovers.com

post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Too many skis? Thats just crazy talk and i won't have it here.


You mention golf? Golfers are allowed 14 clubs in their bag...with each club having a specific purpose. So, using this thinking 14 should be the optimum amount of skis in a quiver. Now, i said optimum..not too many
Phil, maybe you can get Subaru to manufacture/market a personal mini snowcat with built in multi-ski carrier/holders for easy on/off use at the top of the mountain. Go to it!!
post #5 of 22
Captain S.

You just need to be a little creative and the 5 ski quiver thing is no problem.

The biggest problem is packing the ski bag (I live in Chicago, So I'm always packing & flying to ski).

Plan A) Ship you skis to a ski shop at the resort for wax. The ski shop receives, uncrates and waxes the skis for $7.00. You fly with no skis to carry and you gear is good to go when you arrive. Just be sure they don't discard you packing materials.

Plan B) Make local friends or know your distant relatives. "I'm coming back in 3 weeks, can I leave my gear with you"? This works better with family members than with total strangers. "My Uncle Harry is your Mothers 2cd Cousin". That 6 degrees of separation works every time.

Plan C) Try to get your quiver overlap just right. Have one versatile hard-snow ski and one versatile soft-snow ski. If you own four or more skis, one pair should be versatile enough to cover very icy to boot top deep snow conditions and another should be capable of skiing a 20 inch dump to packed powder. If plan A or B isn't working, than plan C must be available.

Works for me every time!

Michael
post #6 of 22
TOO MANY SKIS????

How come the moderators haven't deleted this thread yet?

Just remember the previously agreed upon formula for how many skis a Bear should own- X+1, ( where X= the number you currently have)
post #7 of 22
maybe you can put one type of ski on one foot and one on the other. Helps compensate for one leg stronger than the other too.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Too many skis? Thats just crazy talk and i won't have it here.


You mention golf? Golfers are allowed 14 clubs in their bag...with each club having a specific purpose. So, using this thinking 14 should be the optimum amount of skis in a quiver. Now, i said optimum..not too many
He He. There's nothing like baiting a Bear.

The question posed was sincere. But, only a fool could presume that this group would consider a quiver of 5 frivolous (it's actually more than 5 - those are just within the past 24 months).

I stand chastised before you. I've learned my lesson. I shall henceforth put aside all immoral thoughts, and embrace the X + 1 doctrine.

Now, about those Fisher RX-8's? I'm still missing a quick, short-turn carver.
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv View Post
Captain S.

You just need to be a little creative and the 5 ski quiver thing is no problem.

The biggest problem is packing the ski bag (I live in Chicago, So I'm always packing & flying to ski).

Plan A) Ship you skis to a ski shop at the resort for wax. The ski shop receives, uncrates and waxes the skis for $7.00. You fly with no skis to carry and you gear is good to go when you arrive. Just be sure they don't discard you packing materials.

Plan B) Make local friends or know your distant relatives. "I'm coming back in 3 weeks, can I leave my gear with you"? This works better with family members than with total strangers. "My Uncle Harry is your Mothers 2cd Cousin". That 6 degrees of separation works every time.

Plan C) Try to get your quiver overlap just right. Have one versatile hard-snow ski and one versatile soft-snow ski. If you own four or more skis, one pair should be versatile enough to cover very icy to boot top deep snow conditions and another should be capable of skiing a 20 inch dump to packed powder. If plan A or B isn't working, than plan C must be available.

Works for me every time!

Michael
Michael: Sage advice. Plan's A and C would most likely work best.

For Plan C, my M:B5's and M:EX's will cover most contingencies.

Plan A sounds ideal. But it requires true foresight, which may disqualify me from using it.
post #10 of 22
I know exactly how you feel, having 6 pair myself. Probably could trim 2-3 pair easily because of the overlap. Each of the skis I've picked up have been a deal of one type or another during the off season. So I dont feel too bad when the price that I paid for 2 or 3 of my skis equal what some ppl paid for a single pair at full retail. Well, that's the way I justify it to myself

I love it when I can pull out something different and have a blast rediscovering what it's like to ski on slalom ski vs gs, etc..... The right gear for the right conditions can make all the difference between having great day vs a bad day.
post #11 of 22
I knew we could count on Pugli!
post #12 of 22
It seems to me that there's a whole world of skis out there that you're missing - for heaven's sake take off the Atomic blinders and branch out!
At five pairs per manufacturer, your quiver could reach triple digits in no time........
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Is it possible to have too many skis?

Like many, I've fallen prey to the lure of having "the right ski for each condition". Without planning, I've accumulated 5 new pairs of skis in the past 2 years (Sugar Daddy, M:EX, M:B5, M:9, IZOR 9:7).
The answer is no of course, but perhaps one can have too many Atomics. (cue Atomicman)
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeezer View Post
It seems to me that there's a whole world of skis out there that you're missing - for heaven's sake take off the Atomic blinders and branch out!
At five pairs per manufacturer, your quiver could reach triple digits in no time........
You have a point. I didn't consciously intend to binge on Atomics. It just turned out that way. I'm equally enamored with Volkl, but Atomic opportunities were more plentiful.

I subscribe to "Wizard's" theory of justifying purchases based upon a great deal (my pitch to the wife).

Casting aside all qualms (and desire to remain married), I'd also buy the Mantra and Fisher's RX-8.

I know that "professional help" is available, but I'm fine. Really, I am.
post #15 of 22
I felt I had too many skis so I simplified things last year. I didn't like having to tweak my technique and reacquaint myself with my skis all the time. I demoed a ton of skis before settling on a pair of Rossi B3s for my everyday ski. I use them 80% of the time. The only times I use different skis (besides rocks skis) are hard snow days and deep powder days.
post #16 of 22
Rio,
Good point about the reacquainting yourself with different skis each time. When I had just 1 pair, I would learn how to make that ski work under all different conditions. You lose out on getting to really know the intricacies of ski unless you're on them all the time. I'm not too sure how the wife would feel about me getting too intimate with a ski, so I like to switch em up a bit
post #17 of 22
See you don't have too many skis you have too much overlap. Its like a basketball team with 3 shooting guards.

The MB5, M9, and 9:7 essentially cover the same position in your quiver. You are lacking the key position of mogul specific, twin tip, Big Mtn Charger, and a reverse camber pow specialist!
post #18 of 22
i've started to wonder this as well.

I currently have 3 skis in my active quiver (No Ka Oi, Karma, Mantra), one pair of Blizzard Titan 8's awaiting mounting, and a pair of Spats.

I also have M:EX, Titan 9, King Salmon, Sick Bird, and Bro on my short list of others skis I would like (all in varying lengths so even if I'm overlapping in waist width, I'll have different sizes from 175 - 188).

At any rate my buddy pointed something out: the more skis you have of varying performance the more you will be spending time dialing into them each time you ride.

I've actually started to experience this. If I ride the No Ka Ois for a weekend I have to dial in to their stiffness and really lean forward and ride the tips (something I have always been aprehensive to do). It usually takes me a good day to figure 'em out and then I start ripping on 'em.

When I switch to the Karmas, which are noticeably shorter, I have to adapt to them in that I have found I need to ride them lower (i.e. in more of slalom crouch) and pressure them on the straightlines as well as watch for the backseat threat.

And with the Mantras I have to re-adapt my stance to a bit wider and go for what I call the Mantra glide where I'm not working/forcing the ski as hard as I would on the Karmas or No Ka Ois.

Pretty much in each case I have to tweak my riding style to tailor toward the performance of the ski. Thus I'm kind of always hop-skotching between stances and what not.

Not sure if this is a good thing or not or if I'm just slow to adapt to different skis.

Anyway, that's one of the "problems" I've been encountering, beyond the "which ski am I going to ride today?" dilemma.
post #19 of 22
I understand the feeling. So far this year, all my skiing has been on two skis out of my four-ski quiver, and one ski in particular has done most of the work. I might get to use the other skis if there is a powder dump or when spring skiing comes around, but at the moment a two-ski quiver would be working fine for me. Ask me again at the end of the season and I might feel differently, but for now the logistics of a four ski quiver are not practical or needed for most trips.
post #20 of 22
I subscribe to "Wizard's" theory of justifying purchases based upon a great deal (my pitch to the wife).

Casting aside all qualms (and desire to remain married), I'd also buy the Mantra and Fisher's RX-8.

I know that "professional help" is available, but I'm fine. Really, I am.[/quote]

Well they say that the first step on the road to recovery is admitting that you have a problem, but you are clearly in denial.

Addiction is not pretty. I would recommend a 12 step program, perhaps starting with the purchase of those RX8's you're lusting after, followed by the Mantras. You'll find that after that, it all starts to flow nicely and before you know it, you'll be well.

Don't worry about your wife - I'm sure she'll stand by you through it all - any loving spouse would.
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
See you don't have too many skis you have too much overlap. Its like a basketball team with 3 shooting guards.

The MB5, M9, and 9:7 essentially cover the same position in your quiver. You are lacking the key position of mogul specific, twin tip, Big Mtn Charger, and a reverse camber pow specialist!
There is merit to this point of viewl

I initially bought the M9's and 9:7's as easier-flexing alternatives to the MB:5. The 9:7's have much less side-cut (9:7 radius = 16 meters, vs 12 meters for MB:5's and 13.5 meters for M:9's).

I've discovered the M9's are as adept at high-speed cruising as the 9:7's, but they're quicker in short-radius turns. The MB:5's, with the tightest radius, is less of a long-turn cruiser.

The 9:7's have most overlap with the M:9's. The best high-speed cruiser, by far, are the M:EX's. If I had to live with just one ski, it may be this one.

Ditto on the point of having to constantly adjust styles. Even within the Atomic family, the ride differs significantly depending upon the model.

I find I must "re-dial" my stance on each ski. I suppose racers do this all the time, and they're used to it. For me, it takes a few runs.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeezer View Post
Well they say that the first step on the road to recovery is admitting that you have a problem, but you are clearly in denial.

Addiction is not pretty. I would recommend a 12 step program, perhaps starting with the purchase of those RX8's you're lusting after, followed by the Mantras. You'll find that after that, it all starts to flow nicely and before you know it, you'll be well.

Don't worry about your wife - I'm sure she'll stand by you through it all - any loving spouse would.
Hi. My name is Captain Strato, and I have a problem.

Once I'm back to 3 new pair per year, I'll be on the road to recovery.
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