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What size skis for my 4.5 year old

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
: How long should her skis be? I was told by her most recent ski school instructor that her skis are too short for her to make wedge easily. Same skis she had last year. Now only to her mid sternum. Should they be up to her shoulders? She has such cute little K2 Luve Bug skis - she doesn't want to give them up. Of course I could find another pair that is longer if that is the correct size. Any input appreciated. BD
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpdad View Post
: How long should her skis be? I was told by her most recent ski school instructor that her skis are too short for her to make wedge easily. Same skis she had last year. Now only to her mid sternum. Should they be up to her shoulders? She has such cute little K2 Luve Bug skis - she doesn't want to give them up. Of course I could find another pair that is longer if that is the correct size. Any input appreciated. BD
anywhere in the Chin to Nose area. Although when they're really little you can go shorter. Shorter wouldn't prevent her from wedging and in fact would make it easier so not sure what thats about
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
She said that because the skis were too short is was hard for my daughter to from a wedge without significant movement of her ankles/hips or somehting similar to that. She suggested a longer ski, but said not up to her chin/nose until she was older and more accomplished at skiing. My dauhgter hasn't gotten off the magic carpet yet - she loves skiing - has a big grin on every time I pick her up from ski school.

I'm not sure either as this is the only instructor that has mentioned her ski length.
post #4 of 17
Where I work, in our kid's ski program, we put the kids on skis that come up to their shoulders. I think shorter skis are harder to stop in... you have to form a bigger wedge for them to stop, especially before they get good balance on skis. Up to sternum doesn't give enough stopping power, past the chin forces them to spread their legs more to do a quick stop without crossing the tips. Just my thoughts on the matter...

You might consider renting a different size ski and watching a little bit of the lesson to see which size she seems most comfortable in.. Also, if you are an accomplished skier yourself, you may want to watch to see what they are working on with her.

From an instructor standpoint (I teach at Canaan Valley), It seems to me that at 4.5 years old, and multiple lessons, she should be able to wedge stop and possibly turn. I've had many 4 year olds coming to a stop with a wedge in an hour. It could be a developmental thing though... Can she wedge her feet without skis on? If so, her balance may be off when she is on skis... fix the balance issues and stopping usually comes very easily.

Sorry to go off topic.. just something I picked up on..
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
She actually turns fairly well. But stopping isn't one of her priorities - she usaully bumps into the instructor a little. Her physical abilites are improving - I think her gymnastic calss helps with that.

Depending on the Mt, I usually watch her for 20 minutes or so at least once if not twice-three times per day. She can wedge her feet without skis. She did "green light, orange light, red light" sliding down a small hill with her ski boots on yesterday - repeating what she learned that day in her lesson.

Thanks, BD
post #6 of 17
That sounds more like it.... I had a girl that could wedge well, but had a hard time stopping and it turned out to be that she was 'leaning back'... in the back seat. I had her put her hands on her thighs for a few minutes, she had no problem from then out.. after she realized that not leaning back makes it a ton easier, her stance improved quickly....

The day before, the guy teaching her had her edgie-wedgied all day (10-3). I hate edgie-wedgies, so when I got the task of being her instructor, I didn't even put one on her and I had her stopping very well within 15 minutes.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
[quote=hydrogen_wv;650976]That sounds more like it.... I had a girl that could wedge well, but had a hard time stopping and it turned out to be that she was 'leaning back'... in the back seat. I had her put her hands on her thighs for a few minutes, she had no problem from then out.. after she realized that not leaning back makes it a ton easier, her stance improved quickly....quote]

Dad has the same problem : . I'll see if that helps her. She is very open to suggestion still. Thanks again.
post #8 of 17
You just want to have hands on knees/thighs for long enough to fix the balance issue. You should notice an IMMEDIATE difference. If not, there is another underlying issue and stance may be fine.

You don't want to have her keep her hands on her knees at all times, because that bends the torso forward which would be a bad HABIT... Just long enough for her to realize that the more forward stance makes (almost) everything easier.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrogen_wv View Post
That sounds more like it.... I had a girl that could wedge well, but had a hard time stopping and it turned out to be that she was 'leaning back'... in the back seat. I had her put her hands on her thighs for a few minutes, she had no problem from then out.. after she realized that not leaning back makes it a ton easier, her stance improved quickly...
Being in the back seat is never good, but it's not a cause for inability to turn and/or stop. Good skiers at a young age can literally sit on their skis and easily come down blue/blue-diamond type of terrains. I have seen J4/5 racers comfortably coming down a black headwall in his/her "natural" exaggerated potty position.

It's a bad habit and it's cerainly not good for his/her progression. But, it's generally not an obstable for turning and stopping. Most kids do it because they can get away with it.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpdad View Post
She actually turns fairly well. But stopping isn't one of her priorities - she usaully bumps into the instructor a little.
If she likes turning (unlike many other kids, particularly boys) have her complete her turns to stop (J-turn). I personally don't think bracing to a stop in a snowplow is a good idea ever. Show her how to keep turning until facing the side, or a bit beyond, of a moderate hill. In fact, don't even tell her about what happens at the end of the turn. Have her find that out for herself then point that out to her. (key here is don't let her turn towards the fall line)

Once she is used to that, then have her connect her turns.

That approach will get her ready for a hockey stop. You can never progress directly to that from a pizza stop.

With that being said, don't rush it. Let her be the one to surprise you.

Quote:
Her physical abilites are improving - I think her gymnastic calss helps with that.
I can certainly relate.
post #11 of 17
From my experiences, I've had many kids that have problems stopping due to being too far back. You may have jr. racers with no problems, but that is because they have better balance and they know how to pressure where they need to to be able to stop...

Some kids, it's a non-issue. Some kids run fine in the back seat, but others don't. Having them put their hands on their knees/thighs often helps with another issue i see sometimes with younger kids... They bow their knees out and try stopping on flat bases, barely any edge at all. Also, a more forward stance will put pressure more evenly along the whole inside edges of the ski. While in the back seat, more pressure is on the tail...
post #12 of 17
All kids at a young age 4-5 are in the back seat. They dont have the muscles yet to balance effectively especially with that big head flopping around
post #13 of 17
IMO, at this point in her development, no shorter than collar bone, no taller than chin. Too short and it is similar to a snowblade -- better for edging than sliding. A wedge is all about sliding.

You may also ask someone about forward mounting by 1cm or so, as it makes the shovels easier to pressure. At this stage of development who really cares about the back seat? It's gotta be fun first!
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Consensus is that I need longer skis. I will get some or rent some and see how it improves her skiing. Differences on teaching methodology - I will not be teaching her for some time now, therefore I can pt off those issues and let her instructors deal with that

thanks for the input. BD
post #15 of 17
I started my 5 year old on 80 CM and now at 6 I have her on 90 CM. Next Year at 7 she will be on 100 and I will see how it goes from there.

Possibly if she does well in Nancy Green racing next year (7 year old) I will move her right to 110 cm if she progresses really quickly.

This year on the 90 cm she is having no problems at all and I am confident if I gave her some 100 she would be fine.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
She did her first chair lift and green run at Buttermilk last week. 1800 feet vertical on HomesteadRoad. She was psyched. Instructors said 80 cm would be good for her - a little below her shoulders. 90 cm would be above her chin.
post #17 of 17
185 cm Metron EX's. You don't want to buy something she will grow out of!
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