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Level II Exam Teaching Assignment Samples

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I recently read the posts regarding the P.S.I.A. Level II and Level III skiing tasks. I was wondering if any of you could post some samples of Level II teaching assignments that I can create some lesson plans for. I'm going to be taking my Level II very soon, and could really use some practice with this part of the exam process.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer!!

Sincerely,

~Snowmiser~
post #2 of 21
Level II tasks

Twelve year old boy, fairly athletic, wedge Christy skis matching at the end of the turn.
Coach him to get his skis to match at the beginning of the turn.

Women just returned to skiing after not having skied for several years, recently had a baby. Wants to ski with grace and style.

Fourteen year old girl who is a champion kick boxer. Makes wedge Christy turns and has trouble controlling her speed.

Skier makes wedge turns comfortably on all green and moderate blue terrain. Coach movements and skills to bring skier to the next level.

Skier can vary the size of the wedge and stop and control speed using the wedge. Coach the skier to make turns in both directions.

In the exam you will have to select appropriate terrain for each task.

These are actual exam tasks from the LII PSIA-E exam. I'll post a few more if I can remember them.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bill!

That's a HUGE Help! Keep them comming PLEASE!

Thanks Again!

~Snowmiser~
post #4 of 21
I’ve got two more for you. I should have taken better notes. It was only last week but it’s all a blur now. Fortunately, I won’t have to do it again.

Both of these were in the Creative teaching module.

Young boy who roller blades, has never skied before. He has performed preliminary movements with skis off. Coach him in his next movements with both skis on.

Young boy who loves flying and airplanes, his father is a pilot. He makes wedge Christy turns. Coach him to match his skis earlier in the turn.

Are you working with other candidates and your trainers on this?
post #5 of 21
Bill,

sounds like the Eastern and Rocky Mountain div examiners are eating from the same table - I heard many of the same scenarios from my examiner during the L2 exam prep clinic last week.
post #6 of 21
Maybe the divisions are saving money by buying the cards from the same printer.

It does make sense that the teaching and skiing tasks would be the same if the goal is for the teaching and skiing to be consistent through all the divisions.
post #7 of 21
BillA posted excellent (exact) examples of what you will see in L2 part 2. If you have an examiner on staff or at a nearby hill that does weekly clinicing, get with him/her. They will help a lot.

Also, if you can attend an L2 teaching seminar pre-requisite, it will be a real eye opener for you. I highly reccomend taking it before taking your part 2 exam, especially if you don't have an examiner on staff to help you. If nothing else, it will literally change the way you teach...forever.

At the pre-req, we got got to work with cards very similar to the actual cards used in the exam (like BillA posted) so we got comfortable with the scenarios we might draw and have to teach in the exam. At Level 1, most instructors are "instructing from a cookbook" (ie. we do this, this, this and this), at L2 you start learning to create your own recipes on the fly based on the needs of the student at that time and start doing more coaching, than "cookbook instructing".

You can create your own set of cards to work on with other instructors. One set of cards should be the actual skiing task ranging from never evers to open parallel or even dynamic parallel turns. Example: wedge turns both left and right but needs to link them, stems at the beginning of the turn, links parallel turns on green, but wants to advance to blue terrain, etc.

The second set of cards should be a student profile. Example: 6 year old from Florida who rollerblades and has never seen snow, 16 year old male and his hobbies are Xbox and chatting online or 65 year old female, retired insurance salesperson who does yoga 3 times a week. Be creative and as off the wall with the profiles as you can. Pull one card from each stack and develop a lesson based on that person and their skills.

You will learn to think outside the box and become very creative to help them make the moves they need based on something they already know.

Last year, I had a man in his late 40's who decided to learn to ski because his kids were learning. He was overweight, did absolutely nothing physical, ever. He worked, watched TV and ate. I discovered he loved to watch football and eat pizza/beer during the games with his friends. After learning basic wedge turns, I needed to get him to start to move into the direction of the turns (crossover). I got him to relate to this movement by discussing sitting on the couch and letting one rip with his friends. He was a very jovial and outgoing guy so he laughed and grasped the concept of leaning forward and to the side to let one go real quick. He had a good time, laughed and started moving into the turns. That's what L2 teaching is about, transferring a skill or movement that the student already knows and applying it to their skiing.
post #8 of 21
Don't forget terrain selection, safety (Responsibility code), environmental considerations, how the drills relate to the drills, moving the class, say what you're doing, do what you say, say what you did.
post #9 of 21
Don't forget terrain selection (don't stop next to a snow gun: ), safety (Responsibility code), environmental considerations, how the skills relate to the drills, moving the class, say what you're doing, do what you say, say what you did.
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks Taylormatt, BillA and Icanseeformiles!

We did nothing like that at my Level II prep. I was really disappointed. This is exactly what I was looking for!

Wish me luck!

~Snowmiser~
post #11 of 21
Something to keep in mind: I know this is true in Rocky Mountain division, not sure about the others. When preparing the lesson plan for the child, make sure that you know (and let the examiner know you know) the motivation of the child's parents.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post
Thanks Taylormatt, BillA and Icanseeformiles!

We did nothing like that at my Level II prep. I was really disappointed. This is exactly what I was looking for!

Wish me luck!

~Snowmiser~
Are you working with your trainers and other candidates from your area on prepping for the exam? When is the exam?

Good Luck!
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi BillA!

Yes, I've been working with Level III's during clinics, and a few times during the weekdays. I did the Level II prep. but was disappointed. We didn't cover any teaching scenarios other than the one that we were given to teach on the 2nd day. We also did hardly any of the skiing tasks for level II.

I feel confidant about my skiing, but I'm normally teaching private lessons to little kids, so teaching infront of instructors and examiners is very intimidating to me.

I really appreciate all of you help Bill!

I'll let you know how it goes!

~Anne~
a.k.a. Snowmiser
post #14 of 21
Anne


You'll do fine. Forget about the "being on stage" part, and just do what you do.


SKI!!!!!!!


.....and most of all. Have Fun!!!!!


Good Luck!
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post
I recently read the posts regarding the P.S.I.A. Level II and Level III skiing tasks. I was wondering if any of you could post some samples of Level II teaching assignments that I can create some lesson plans for. I'm going to be taking my Level II very soon, and could really use some practice with this part of the exam process.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer!!

Sincerely,

~Snowmiser~
You got some great examples of different types of skiers and abilities that you could be asked to try to improve but don't get too bogged down with creating lesson plans for those or any other skiers. Know what tasks/drills/skills that will help a particular problem in ones skiing and adapt it to the situation you are given. In the east most exams are done on 1 or 2 trails that the examiner picks out for the level of skiing you would be working at. Sometimes the conditions ( snow and slope) that you get for your teaching time might not fit for your preconceived lesson plan (you can ask to move to different terrain but it probably will have to be on the trails that examiner want to test on). Be prepared to shift gears and use other tasks/drillls etc. Remember to adapt your teaching for different guest i.e. kids, seniors, women, an examiner might ask you how or if you would modify your lesson based on those populations also. One other thing that I have found in exams (at least in the east) is that the exam description might say you have 10-15 minutes or one run or part of a run but in reality I have found you get about 7-8 minutes so use your time wisely. Explain your task briefly, demo coming and going is best, time for practice, give feedback to participants and wrap up. Examiners do like to ask questions to see your knowledge of things, answer the best you can but don't try to bs them and never debate them. Good luck and try to have fun at the exam and get some good group interactions going that will help at an exam.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi Snowblower!

You were right on the money with your advice! I did everything you said, and the exam went great! I passed on everything all 3 days and was the only one in my group to get the pin. A couple of the guys in my group got accredited, so I guess they have to retake the exam to pass all the way.

There was one guy in my group that I thought would pass, but he talked way too much, and it was like ten below or colder with windchill. I just followed the k.i.s.s. rule and it worked.

Thanks for your great words of wisdom!

Sincerely!

~Anne Mattack~
"snowmiser"
post #17 of 21
Wow the only one in the group huh? that must have been tough because if there are good group interactions some people will get pulled along. Sounds like you were the only one prepared and you blazed the trail. The other 2 you mentioned that sort of passed. Sounds like they didn't and if it is because of the written exam then I don't feel they passed. In my level 3 exam a few years back we had this one person who passed the on hill part but failed the written, to me if one just opened the books a couple of times they should be able to pass that part. Where is the commitment. Someone like yourself who was well prepared and passed all 3 days now thats a commitment. So enjoy what you accomplished, if and when you go for the 3 my one piece of advice is get off the groomed and ski everything else, bumps, crud, ice, powder, side hills, double fall lines, ridges, park and pipe etc. ski hard and often and you will be well on your way. By the way its Snowbowler because I teach at Middlebury College Snowbowl.. Congrads, David
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your encouraging words David! In order to take the on hill exam, everybody has to have already passed the written exam before they can even register for the on hill part. You have to pass two out of the three days on teaching and skiing to pass the on hill exam.

On the third day, after I finished my teaching assignment my examiner sent everyone else back up the hill and told them to ski open parallel all the way back down to us again. He didn't say why, so I asked him if he wanted me to do movement analysis and he nodded yes. After I did the M.A., he spoke to each member of the group explaining what they needed to work on. It was strange, because he never had anyone else in the group do any movement analysis. This made me a little uneasy, but I didn't dare ask him why!

I sure am glad that's over! I'll take your advice about how to prepare for Level III. I've already started reading the Level III study guide, but I'm just going to enjoy skiing for the rest of the season.

~Anne~
post #19 of 21
If anyone else needs some sample creative teaching stuff, I made this post last year
post #20 of 21
Bump . . .

Does anyone have any sample Level III teaching stuff (Eastern division)? My girlfriend is taking the teaching portion (after already passing the skiing portion last year) and she's freaking out about it. She already took on the examples in the Manual (both the creative teaching and the Teaching movements and Skills) and now she's looking for more. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
post #21 of 21
mattchuck2,

Make up some of your own skier and skiing profiles and post them here for comment. I'll try to get a look at the cards our trainer made up for the LIII exam.
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