New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

bit of wax left after scraping

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Been waxing my skis (I'm new to this so it took longer than it should!)
It seems that when I scraped, the large majority of wax came off.
I then brushed and wiped over with a fibertex cloth.

On running my hand over the skis I can feel some extra wax at the tips. It's basically flat but not totally smooth. Will this be okay to use and ski on. I can't seem to get the shined & clean effect on the skis as good as the shop did it but that's to be expected...
post #2 of 17
The tips barely even touch the snow, so I am thinking this is fine,,
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
what about any parts that touch the snow?
I guess the wax will wear down pretty quick anyway?
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
?
post #5 of 17
Scrape it smooth or let the snow smooth it.
post #6 of 17
scrape, scrape, scrape. then brush, brush, brush.

After a while, you get a feel of just how much wax to apply. Your shop is probably using a roto-brush system. But you can still get nearly as good by hand. Drip on only what you need. Scrape off all that you can. (Don't be tempted to use your metal scraper.) Then brush well with your nylon brushes (if you have more than one, first with medium, then with soft, and then with horsehair if you have it). After the brushing, polish with some softer fibertex pads. I use a synthetic dusting cloth to polish (the ones without any pre-impregnated cleaner)...works great for me.

Or, if all else fails....yes, the snow will smooth it out.

Keep tunin'. It's fun.

Cheers
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
I scraped it well, it's just that in some areas it created a sort of skipping mark on the wax where it caught some then realeased then caught it again. I'm pretty sure the bases are flat because it's new so I'm not sure what I did here - maybe I used too much wax or maybe the scraper was getting a bit blunt?

Brushing it flattened this out to some extent although maybe I should have gone over it more times. I only did 3 overlapping runs from tip to tail.
Some guides said you should do this at least 20 times.

?????:?????
post #8 of 17
This sort of thing happpens to me, too, Gordon. Remember that the plastic/plexiglass scraper may flex as well, which may contribute to the skipping. That, however, can be useful, in certain applications.

You might do well to dismisss the guides' dogma, as would we all, and simply scrape as you need to. Still, many prefer to scrape only in one direction: tip-to-tail. I don't find this entirely necessary: tip-to-tail or tail-to-tip, or any combination to satisfy the task. The important thing is not to wax across the breadth of the ski, as this is when we tend to make errors and gouge/scrape the base.

I wouldn't worry about how many times you make a scraping pass. Do what it takes, no more and no less.

When I feel that I have scraped it nearly all off, I make a very light pass with a brass brush. This shows me exactly where I need to scrape more.

But, yes, a sharp scraper does help. I keep one scraper fairly sharp and one less so, which I use to go back and scrape the stubborn bits.

And then, brush, brush, brush.

This is how I've been doing my alpine skis since my racing days and how I do my XC skis, for which flat bases and glide are *really* important. Others will surely have their own methods.

Let us know how it works out for you, Gordon.

Cheers
post #9 of 17
Sharp scraper + nylon ROTOBRUSH
Shouldn't take more than ~ 3 minutes per ski to get a fast, shiny, perfect finish. The Rotobrush really does the trick IMO, and well worth the money in time saved if you are planning on making waxing your own skis a regular habit.
post #10 of 17
Then of course, you could leave the wax on like I do (much to the dismay of many on this board) and just let the first run on the snow do the scraping for you. If you wax more often because it's less of a hassle, then maybe it's better for the skis than making a production of it.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
Then of course, you could leave the wax on like I do (much to the dismay of many on this board) and just let the first run on the snow do the scraping for you.
: Good Lord, man! That's madness! :

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
... maybe it's better for the skis than making a production of it.
You're never going to hurt a ski by scraping the wax off and brushing it, no matter how many times. Waxing at too high a temperature though is the only potential poblem I could see.
post #12 of 17
I'm with Sibhusky...if you're not racing, why bother scraping and structuring wax? That's just anal. Here in the Mid-Atlantic, the man made snow is like sandpaper and strips all wax in a day anyways. I simply hot wax and run the iron back over to smooth it out and go ski. If you're not looking to shave .001 seconds, scraping/brushing is not necessary.
post #13 of 17

What he said...

Quote:
Originally Posted by carvemeister View Post
Sharp scraper + nylon ROTOBRUSH
Shouldn't take more than ~ 3 minutes per ski to get a fast, shiny, perfect finish. The Rotobrush really does the trick IMO, and well worth the money in time saved if you are planning on making waxing your own skis a regular habit.
...if you want to do it right. If you're scraper isn't sharp, it's like shaving with a dull knife. If you gotta brush, rotobrushes are why we came up with electricity...save your brushing cycles for curry combing your horses or something. If you still have some wax, don't worry about it. Why is scraping good? Here's why:

- Better performance quicker. Come ski in the Rockies and you'll know why. Last weekend we had a Masters GS/Super G weekend at Keystone...minus 13 C snow temps. Those who wax with blue, scraped, and brushed, went fast. Those who didn't XC skied to the first gate.

- There is a theory that if you don't scrape, harsh snow will smooth some, but it will also rip wax out of the base...not good for the base...
post #14 of 17
Try flexing the scraper by bending the two sides either back or forth (thumbs in the middle). With the scraper flexed, try getting at the areas that you couldn't get at when the scraper was straight. If this works, you're skis aren't entirely flat (or you scraper isn't very true).
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Is there ay chance of damaging the ptex base if the scraper flexes too much?
...or is this highly unlikely ?
post #16 of 17
Gordon-

RELAX

- plastic scrapers will not damage the base unless you really try.

-- some not quite shiny spots will NOT reduce your glee in skiing on a nicely waxed ski

--as others have said above, getting some wax on and thus avoiding base burn is really the primary objective- a quick scrape and brush and you will be good to go (see my response to the thread scraping sideways- most of this anal behavior is driven by tuning of speed skis. I ahve to assume you are not preparing skis for a FIS DH next week)
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
\
- There is a theory that if you don't scrape, harsh snow will smooth some, but it will also rip wax out of the base...not good for the base...
I tried for a long time, scarping and just brushing a bit, where there was uneveness, and then using fibretex

The snow removed the wax double quick. Base burn became a problem.

Now, I scrape like mad and then brush with the right brush past the point that it no longer comes off like snow, until it's pretty clean. Then fibretex just a couple passes. I find that the wax stays on much much longer.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs