or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Doing your own binding adjustments and the relationship with leg inuries
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Doing your own binding adjustments and the relationship with leg inuries - Page 3

post #61 of 66
Thread Starter 
The teacher becomes the student. Not a plug and play system binding, but I have to ask myself, was my torn meniscus a product of me doing my own binding adjustments?
post #62 of 66
When I saw this thread I thought of skydivers who insist on packing their own chutes.

Phil you said you took a hard fall in the trees... and hit your knee. The ski released which is what its supposed to do. Not sure how this is supposed to be related to who does your shop work.
post #63 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jviss View Post
Can we take a tangent, and figure out this word? I've never heard this term, and can't find it in the dictionary, or by searching the web.

Could it be that you mean rotted, as in past tense of the verb rot?

Thanks!
Yup.....as in decompose......you don't realise how much you rely on spell checker until you dont have it.
post #64 of 66
Random thoughts:
1. Mounting your own bindings is a lot different than adjusting them. I don't have jigs, so I usually find it easier to pay the kid at the shop a six pack to put them on.
2. As far as adjusting goes, it's pretty braindead on a lot of rental bindings. I'd say if you can read the chart and turn a screwdriver you're probably adept enough to adjust your own.
3. Notice the caveat in the last sentence where I said "rental bindings"? Recreational bindings can be slightly trickier. It would be naive of someone to think that because they can adjust a rental binding they could adjust others. There's all kinds of fancy settings on them that make it a little tougher. I've done it before, but I usually find it easier to have the kid I gave a six pack to do it.
post #65 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
There's all kinds of fancy settings on them that make it a little tougher.
For example?
post #66 of 66
Phil-

My complete support to you. There is no rocket science in binding adjustment, and you can do it as well and probably with more care than the overworked and underpaid kid in the shop. In fact, that used to be the case, as a kid I remember that Marker bindings were sold with a paper peice showing the locations of the holes and a (completely useless) chart for binding settings. So you just knew your setting and tend to go by it and adjust it when things felt wrong.

Just to remind the outraged "get it done by a pro" crowd- the retention setting is based mainly on the diameter of tibia bone. When was the last time a shop measured that for you? I am quite comfortable adjusting my own binding and my family's bindings as well. I typically agree with what the shop sets, but if I feel that something is wrong, then I won't hesitate to take out a screwdriver and turn those screws. If your skis are flying off in mid-turn or if the binding didn't open when you feel that it should have, it is time to correct things.

A.

P.S. The one time my wife tore her ACL, she was on a rental ski adjusted by a "pro". (I do know that ACLs are not binding-related)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Doing your own binding adjustments and the relationship with leg inuries