New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Marker Duke Binding

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Check out this binding!
http://www.couloirmag.com/mfgs/dynam...?articleID=267

Sounds almost to good to be true. Are these even out on the market yet? If so has anyone had a chance to give them a go?

Seems like a heavy binding for the serious BC folk, but not a bad deal for us daytrippers.

I wonder what touring would be like in Alpine Boots?? Sure hope one was not planning on going very far!

Look forward to your comments.
post #2 of 28
The binding is expected to be available on next year's line and might match up well with the anticipated Volkl Katana. It may overcome the biggest problem with AT bindings, which is the wobble that can really make driving wide skis a problem, especially on harder snow surfaces and inbounds. This is the kind of binding that moves towards being able to have a single outfit that tours and works for resort skiing. Its certainly not for death march long slogs in the deep backcountry, but I think it will be attractive to a significant portion of the skiers who access lift-served side-country and shorter backcountry tours that emphasize burly downhill lines.

I'd be interested to know how much lift is in this binding. It appears to be much lower than the Fritschi and Naxo binders.
post #3 of 28
I have a nephew who uses regular Alpine Boots to tour. His boots are the new Kryton. I guess with the buckles loose you can do a faily normal up hill walk. He even does multi day trips deep into the back country on trekkers! He would rather then an AT binding. He and his ski buddies are all young he is 22 and very athletic. The weight issues don't bother him much. He wants gear that will hold up when he is dropping cliff bands and charging hard. a binding like that would work well for him and others like him.
post #4 of 28
I'm just curious, but does anybody still use the old Marker Touring binding- the M3 Tour?
post #5 of 28
a couple weeks ago, i spent an evening checking out the Duke. very solid and very nice binding... perfect for "sidecountry" trips, ie. like skiing at Alpine Meadows and deciding to tour out of bounds towards Twin Peaks for a couple of runs, and then back in-bounds.

from my understanding, there were several parameters (such as low stack height, short overall foot print, 16 DIN, no insta-tele, etc.) which the folks who wanted this binding insisted on. a friend who has actually skiied the Duke claims it feels as solid as a World Cup race binding.

in any case, i be looking forward to testing some out...
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by chili View Post
a couple weeks ago, i spent an evening checking out the Duke. very solid and very nice binding... perfect for "sidecountry" trips, ie. like skiing at Alpine Meadows and deciding to tour out of bounds towards Twin Peaks for a couple of runs, and then back in-bounds.

from my understanding, there were several parameters (such as low stack height, short overall foot print, 16 DIN, no insta-tele, etc.) which the folks who wanted this binding insisted on. a friend who has actually skiied the Duke claims it feels as solid as a World Cup race binding.

in any case, i be looking forward to testing some out...
OK, you are now responsable for coming back with a full report.
post #7 of 28
will we see future compatability? it mounts on a track right? and to switch from touring mode to alpine mode, it slides backwards on a track. is this track similiar to any of marker's system alpine bindings?

I would love to buy one binding and two or three skis that all had the same track/plate. Kind of like the poor snowboarder who only has one set of bindings.

boot soles are standard now... who knows, maybe binding interfaces will standardize too. they are kind of already amid ski makers. (I'm dreaming, but it's a good dream.)

attn marker; on paper, the duke looks like an awesome binding. Now give me three sets of plates/tracks to mount on my other skis.
post #8 of 28
Hmm thats a great idea, haven't seen anyone else mention it. And for those who have more skis than they really have room it might also make storage a bit easier

It looks like you would have to take your skis off and flip the lever in the middle to go to touring mode Here is a pic of the bindign i touring position
post #9 of 28
I loved the last sentence in the CouloirMag review:

"Overall, everyone is excited about the potential for attracting new customers to the backcountry via Marker’s Duke."

EVERYone?
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
I loved the last sentence in the CouloirMag review:

"Overall, everyone is excited about the potential for attracting new customers to the backcountry via Marker’s Duke."

EVERYone?
Kind of a double edge sword, eh? We like the inovations to gear, but not a big fan of all the people it takes to make that happen. In other words the more people who buy the gear they more it forces companies to develop new gear. Maybe the hope is that couch jockeys with a gear fiend will just buy all the gear to hang in thir garage and pay for the development of the technology to let the rest of us get out and ski!

Guess we will just have to keep watching eBay to see when that couch jockey feels the need for an upgrade!
post #11 of 28
The do look pretty sweet, any inovation in the AT binding realm is cool. Good to see Marker pushing the envelope, wonder if it will push the others.
post #12 of 28
It looks more solid than "normal" markers I wonder how good it really it is.

I doubt the toe release problems of today flatmounted marker will carry over cause the binding is independent from the ski now.
post #13 of 28
Dumb question: With a heavy ATM like this, how is ski flex affected? When locked down, it looks like it would operate much like a traditional solid racing plate. Yes?
post #14 of 28
A couple of quick answers:

The Duke is going to be available re-badged as a Blizzard, to work in their integrated system but the regular Duke is screwed n' glued. There is no 'track' except the heel/AT mode lock down (which is screwed in...) unfortunately for some no switching. Fortunately that lowers the stack height. The binding moves backward 30mm in tour mode to keep the tails of the ski from dragging, moves forward to ski...nice.

The Duke has a 73mm screw hole width, up from the 63mm everyone else uses, this will give great edge response on wider skis.

The Duke has the same upward release as the Comp 30, pre-release shouldn't be an issue.

Tyrolia's engineers spent some time at SIA talking to the Backcountry Mag guys about AT binding design, things could get interesting...
post #15 of 28
Whiteroom are you sure about the 63mm part? I understand that the Duke is wider, I just think maybe the old binders are narrower than that. How could you mount a 63mm binding on a 64mm ski. I'd guess maybe it's more like 50mm? Regardless... I want some.
post #16 of 28

Jester?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
A couple of quick answers:

The Duke is going to be available re-badged as a Blizzard, to work in their integrated system but the regular Duke is screwed n' glued. There is no 'track' except the heel/AT mode lock down (which is screwed in...) unfortunately for some no switching. Fortunately that lowers the stack height. The binding moves backward 30mm in tour mode to keep the tails of the ski from dragging, moves forward to ski...nice.

The Duke has a 73mm screw hole width, up from the 63mm everyone else uses, this will give great edge response on wider skis.

The Duke has the same upward release as the Comp 30, pre-release shouldn't be an issue.

Tyrolia's engineers spent some time at SIA talking to the Backcountry Mag guys about AT binding design, things could get interesting...

Whiteroom:

Did you get any details on the fixed mount "Jester", the Duke version that will not have the touring feature?

Thanks,
Got
post #17 of 28
Yes, The Jester was there. Very, very light, DIN 6-16, compact mounting base, wide stance for fat skis. Both of these bindings are built for the US market to try to recapture the FR market. They are definately targeting Look/ Rossi's customer base. The Jester feels more solid due to the lack of an AT function, the Duke pivots at the toe so it's got a slight bit of play (as do ALL AT systems) and it's lower to the ski. Cool white color with red heel spring.

On both bindings the toe spring is positioned side to side vs. fore aft to create a very compact toe.
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Yes, The Jester was there. Very, very light, DIN 6-16, compact mounting base, wide stance for fat skis. Both of these bindings are built for the US market to try to recapture the FR market. They are definately targeting Look/ Rossi's customer base. The Jester feels more solid due to the lack of an AT function, the Duke pivots at the toe so it's got a slight bit of play (as do ALL AT systems) and it's lower to the ski. Cool white color with red heel spring.

On both bindings the toe spring is positioned side to side vs. fore aft to create a very compact toe.
Thank WR:

That sounds very nice.

I really like the wide mount stance...it really makes sense and seems like it may give a fatty more leverage over the edges for those inevitable ice and bump conditions that occur as well extra stability in all conditions.

Any pics?
post #19 of 28

Duke

Skied the Marker Duke today on a pair of 08 183 Gotama's.

The binding is as stout as they claim, with no slop at all. The touring mode looks bomber as does the entire binding.

Adjustments seem to be fairly simple, and I didn't notice anything different about the stack height.

The system is really innovative, with the switching lever underneath the boot. Yes you will have to take the the ski off to switch from downhill to touring mode and back.

There are 2 climbing post heights and that may get a little noisy - from the chrome post hitting the composite mounting plate.

The binding will come in two sizes - small (265- 330mm I think) and large (310 - 365mm I think).

Marker really has done their homework.

The binding looks like a winner.

HB
post #20 of 28
so the duke will take touring boots, right? if the jester is just the duke w/out the walk function will it take touring boots too?
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarkinBanks View Post
Skied the Marker Duke today on a pair of 08 183 Gotama's.

The binding is as stout as they claim, with no slop at all. The touring mode looks bomber as does the entire binding.

Adjustments seem to be fairly simple, and I didn't notice anything different about the stack height.

The system is really innovative, with the switching lever underneath the boot. Yes you will have to take the the ski off to switch from downhill to touring mode and back.

There are 2 climbing post heights and that may get a little noisy - from the chrome post hitting the composite mounting plate.

The binding will come in two sizes - small (265- 330mm I think) and large (310 - 365mm I think).

Marker really has done their homework.

The binding looks like a winner.

HB
Having to actually take your ski off to switch modes certainly limits the bindings true Backcountry potential. However, I think the Duke's target market is more aimed at Resort served backountry access. Either way it is a step forward. I anticipate others getting into the game if sales do well.
post #22 of 28
Now we need to see if the Duke can over come Markers reputation for pre- releasing.
post #23 of 28
I skied the Duke yesterday on a Blizzard Cronus, it's an 88mm wide ski with a 19m TR. sidewall construction (a really, really nice ski).

This binding is AWSOME. Extremely solid, no slop what so ever. I was skiing on true eastern 'hard pack', if there was going to be any sloppiness I would have noticed. There was NONE. I could drive the forebody of the ski, I could drive the middle of the ski, I could drive the tail of the ski through out the turn. This has been my issue with Fritschi's in the past, they bleed energy out the tail, you can tip the ski on edge but I never felt like I could drive the ski, the Duke felt like an alpine binding while skiing. The engagement sound just instills confidence, a very solid 'thunk' as you step in. The AT mode is burly, flipping it open or closed requires a nice solid effort (it easy enough, but solid feeling) The stack height is taller than I would like for a ski like this (Mojo 15 on my iM88), but not at all a problem, considering the AT function it's low profile. I'm sold. I mean that as in; "I'd take my money out of my wallet and lay it down on a pair this instant", that kind of sold.

As for having to take the ski off to switch modes is missing the point. This thing is NOT LIGHT, you won't want to enter a Randonee race on these. It's a big binding for big skis. This binding is a walk-off grand slam homerun in that it's everything Fritschi and Naxo want to be...but aren't, a binding that can get you to the top of some gnarly terrain and then let you ski aggressively DOWN. It is all about the down. If you're concerned about the UP this is not for you, check out Dynafit. For everyone else, save your pennies this binding is about to be the ONLY REAL CHOICE for sggressive skiers who want a binding that has an AT function.

Oh yeah, it's no more expensive than a Fritschi or Naxo.
post #24 of 28
Whiteroom:

Nice run-down on the Duke! The Blizzard Cronus sounds sweet. How does it compare to the IM88 ?

What else have you demoed recently?
post #25 of 28
Gotama, I skied the Nordica Hellcat, Volkl Bridge, Dynastar Mythic Rider, Scott Punisher, Blizzard Cronus and a Head Monster 78.

A bit about me:
6'2" 225#, I can turn left, right and stop...
I've been demoing (and selling) skis for living for 15yrs.
I ski 75 to 100 days a year, mostly at Stowe Vt. w/ 2 or so trips west a year.

The demo was at Stratton Vt. conditions were very firm (might as well have been chemically hardened race course) with about 3" of superlight duff snow that was quickly pushed around on top. There was enough soft snow on the edges to get a feel for how the skis would transition from firm to soft and from soft to firm. Edge grip was put to the test. Oh, yeah...my testing partner for the day was on the USST development team at 15...she (yes SHE) rips, on alpine or tele. Taking it easy was not an option.

I liked everything I skied...up to a point.

The Nordica was skied first with the best conditions of the day. It will rail 2 footed turns but it feels a bit clunky (90mm will do that), the sidecut also felt unsettled going in and out of the softer snow. It was really fun to roll up on edge and ride the sidecut, but thats ALL it felt like it wanted to do, it didn'twant to skarve, it didn'twant to make quick edgeset changes, it wanted to get on edge early and stay there. In my opinion it's 6mm too wide for it's sidecut, the Jet Fuel makes more sense (as does the Enforcer).

The Volkl Bridge I skied next as a 'control' to test what I thought of the Hellcat. It felt really good. Way more of a freeride feel (that's what I mean by control, I wanted to see if what I think I like IS what I like). it was able to make quick edgeset short radius turns or it could be rolled over and arc'd. It didn't do anything funky going from soft to firm, it felt like it would be really good in softer snow (I skied this on true boiler plate). This will be an improvement on the Karma, you gain some soft snow performance, lose a tiny bit of hard snow performance end up with a better freeride ski. The graphics are Killer.

The Dynastar Mythic Rider was next, it replaces the 8800, a ski I've had luke warm feelings about. I liked it. It has a bit more sidecut and a bit more oomph. This ski fits my idea of a 'one ski' ski. It handled the hardest snow better than the Bridge, it carved really nice mid radius turns and it could make quick fall line turns, I'm positive I would like it in bumps also. If there was a problem it was that it still has a 'vanilla' feel to me, this is purely subjective but I wasn't wowed, I also would have prefered a longer ski. I think this will REALLY impress everyone who likes the 8800.

The Scott Punisher is a new model for next year, it's a twintip version of the Mission ($100 LESS). I was impressed. This ski has a really odd tip profile, the sidecut starts about 5cm down from the tip contact point and it has a progressive sidecut, more sidecut in the front 1/2 less in the 2nd 1/2. This was really noticable on snow. the ski pulled you into the turn but felt very easy to adjust the radius mid-turn. this is a quality that I look for in skis I personally would buy. The ski didn't have much life to it, it was damp and solid feeling with good grip. It blew through heavy/crusty snow under some snow making guns without flinching and railed on some hard snow. I'd say it felt like a cross between a K2 and a Volkl (I know, I know...)

The Blizzard Cronus (88mm) was exactly what I hoped it would be, solid edge grip (really solid) great in the softer snow, easy to make quick fall line edge changes, easy to roll over and arc. It has a nice all-mountain freeride sidecut, it will happily carve or skarve. It did everything the Mythic Rider did but I liked this feel better. The sidecut felt a little more symetrical than I like, I would prefer a bit less sidecut at turn completion (it likes to finish turns) but I could live happily with this ski.

The Head 78 was exactly like a miniature iM88. The 88 is my favorite ski...ever. It suits my style to a T, solid edge grip, lots of taper, smooth, supple and a wide platform that can be tossed around. You don't ride the sidecut you make turns. Same with the 78, just not as wide. I (heart) HEAD.

So in conclussion, these are all skis in the upper 80mm to low 90mm waisted skis. They are all arguably 'one ski' skis with a freeride flair. Here's where personal style comes into play: I wouldn't trade my iM88 for any of these, I liked all of them (and most were too short for me, a problem with demos), I would be happy to spend a day on any if my luggage got lost but I wouldn't spend my money on replacing my ski with one of these.
post #26 of 28
I really hope Blizzard can make a name for itself under the Tecnica umbrella. They make a good product, but never had the marketing..for as long as I can remember.
post #27 of 28
Thank you WR!!

I'm all over the IM88 as well.

A classic shape and a blast to ride...
post #28 of 28
Skied the Duke today on a pair of '08 Gotamas. WOW! Quite possibly the first time Marker has ever blown me away. This binding flat out rocks. No slop, rock steady control, the only AT binding with positive ramp angle, a bomber din. Awesome. This binding has a few drawbacks, you have to step out to switch modes and climb height. It is heavier than the competion but...you feel like you are skiing on a race binding when descending. AT purists likely won't fall in love with it but I think Marker might take a lot of wind out of the sails of Fritschi and Naxo. I know I'll retire my Naxo's when my Dukes arrive.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion