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why are some parents morons?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
While skiing a green run (mainstreet) recently at Crystal Mountain Michigan my son (7yr old) liked going over some very small whoop di doo's. Well he fell and smacked his head really ringing his bell and was in a pile at the end of these 3 small bumps. While we were helping him recover many small kids kept taking these bumps missing us by no more then 2 feet. Then this little girl takes them looses it and slides right up to with in inches of us. I look up at her and asked her " do you really think its a good idea to be going over bumps like that when someone is down at the end of them?" She stands up and starts to ski off with a little help from her father. Who then tells me Hey don't yell at my kid talk to me. She looked like she was in control to me. Since when is asking a question yelling? I just said to him I am a patroller sir have a nice day. I didn't put up crossed ski's because we would be leaving the area directly maybe I should have just to keep the scene safe.


Later that day I saw patrol talking statements from several people at the same location for another accident from a collision at the same location involving kidlets.
post #2 of 16
Last year, I was skiing behind my 6 year old son making lazy turns. He liked me skiing behind him. Anyways, I saw a kid out of the corner of my eye heading straight for me. I put up my forearm and knock him down before he hit me. A little forearm shiver from my linebacker days.

His board made a little slice in the top sheet of my skis. I asked him if he was OK. He said nothing and gave me a defiant stare. I asked again and no response. He got up and started to head down hill. I skied next to him for about 20 feet and lectured him on the code. I could not believe he did not say he was sorry.

I was not in my patrol uniform, but I seriously considered taking him into the patrol hut.

My guess is that his parents did not teach him the importance of responsibility. I took his attitude to be that he was the most important person, and the rest of us should yield to him.
post #3 of 16
Maybe their gene pool is shallow
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
My guess is that his parents did not teach him the importance of responsibility. I took his attitude to be that he was the most important person, and the rest of us should yield to him.
We've talk a lot here about, this and the written "code".

I bet if you take an informal poll on the slopes, you'll find that the majority of weekend skiers think it's the downhill skier's responsibility to stay out of the way of the uphill skier.
post #5 of 16
I had the same conversation with a ski patrol buddy, Monday night. He actually just avoided running into me. I was in front and he was up hill. I ribbed him about the code. Then, we had a discussion. I told him that I believed that less than 10% of people on the hill had any idea of the "code".

Couldn't agree with you more. Maybe we need rearview mirrors.:

With respect to what happened to me, I was surprised by the lack of courtesy. If you run into someone, regardless of whose fault, I would think you would ask are you OK. I am sorry. Something. Not just a stare.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post
We've talk a lot here about, this and the written "code".

I bet if you take an informal poll on the slopes, you'll find that the majority of weekend skiers think it's the downhill skier's responsibility to stay out of the way of the uphill skier.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
... Maybe we need rearview mirrors.:
Here ya go: http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...l%20Produc ts

Many decades ago I used these on a bike helmet for a long tour. Takes a few minutes to adjust and learn where to look on these but they sure work.

Of course it's the dorkiest-looking thing on earth but getting flattened by traffic seemed unsightly too.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post
Maybe we need rearview mirrors.:.
People don't use them when they are driving..what makes you think they will use them on the slopes?
post #8 of 16
My son (age 12) had wanted to get into snow boarding eventually, that is until he got pasted by a boarder much larger than him last week. The guy ran into him, fell on him, and bent one of his poles.

The boarder completely ignored my son, got up and continued down the hill, no help getting up or an apology. I came up too late to say anything.

Now he's convinced that all boarders have the same holier-than-thou attitude, and I'm stuck trying to convince him otherwise. Sigh...

Scottie
post #9 of 16
Having skied for 41 years, I equate boarding with heresy. However, I think that the irresponsibility and lack of courtesy is more of a generational issue than choice of sliding gear.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottie61 View Post
My son (age 12) had wanted to get into snow boarding eventually, that is until he got pasted by a boarder much larger than him last week. The guy ran into him, fell on him, and bent one of his poles.

The boarder completely ignored my son, got up and continued down the hill, no help getting up or an apology. I came up too late to say anything.

Now he's convinced that all boarders have the same holier-than-thou attitude, and I'm stuck trying to convince him otherwise. Sigh...

Scottie
post #10 of 16
The impression of the responsibility code is no longer as embedded as it once was. This is not subjective to skiing but in most everything in life. If "these people" don't respect their surroundings on a daily basis, then how can we expect them to respect the responsibility code when on the hill?

I know the area Kurt is talking about. Some say that it is a risky area because it is where several hills converge on a path to the chairlift. Every ski area has "this" risk area at one place or another. Its just a product of expansion. The very fact that this occurred in this risky area means that the passersby should have used more caution even if there weren't a skier/boarder down. I guess caution is just not in their forte' and thus leaves the responsibility on Us to be more aware of the careless. Sad, huh?
post #11 of 16
All this reminds me of something I learned a few years ago while trying to teach my oldest boy to ski--the most unsafe area of the mountain for new skiers are the low angle green trails!! That's where all the Boarders w/ out skills (and yeah, skiers too-but honestly-mostly boarders) feel comfortable skiing at high speeds way out of control. and there's just endless numbers of aggro-adolescents (man, I'm an old crank!) rudely mucking everything up. By the third of 4rth time my boy got clobbered I resolved never to take beginners on low angle greens again-we got from the "learning chair areas" right to blues-I've found that the higher pitch is much less of a danger and a hinderance the the multitude of piss-poor, non-skilled, youthful rippers that clog the winding greens of most eastern resorts.
post #12 of 16

Run inteference

I was at Okemo two weeks ago, with my six year old. My wife and I spent the whole time doing easy turns behind him, so that he would not be killed by warp speed boarders.

When one of the boarders hit a balcony pole for one of the slopeside condos, it was not pretty. OK, he was trying to stunt, but still......

The only times I have been really hurt skiing was due to spores hitting me in the back.<img>
post #13 of 16
This is the reason I don't ski in Michigan

But, yes, i agree that the parents are sheltering the kid from responsiblity and reality
post #14 of 16
Why are parents morons? Easy answer on this one and sorry, I don't even need to strain.

The generation of people who are now parents were raised in an era where there is acute emphasis on "freedom" and the "rights" of the individual.

The mountain management and the switch to "Rangers" and "Paid Patrol" who are so afraid of the loss of a single paying guest, that they have taken out of the hands of the NSP. What management views as a "paying guest" .... I view as an arrogant accident looking for a place to happen.

Believe it or not, when the man in the Crimson Jacket with the gold cross stopped us, we listened.Did we grumble a bit .... when you left we did a bit .... but we also were hoping that we could be good enough some day to be NSP.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
This is the reason I don't ski in Michigan

But, yes, i agree that the parents are sheltering the kid from responsiblity and reality
There are some advantages to skiing in Michigan, like, skiing with ME!
But you probably don't want to endure that again:

As for moronic parents........I have another rant.........Parents who take their kids skiing in absolute frigid temps and don't haver warm enough gear. Ugh!
I skied in -9 recently, and absolutly loved the conditions, but I had no ski exposure, and took the time for breaks when I felt the least bit fatigued or cold. I saw some kids with normal ski clothing on with facial and neck area exposed. How nuts is that?
post #16 of 16
Reminded by my 16 year old daughter last night that "some parents" aren't morons...all of us are!

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