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Where to tune skis/snowboard in a very small condo

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I have a very small condo (560 sq. ft - 2 bdrm). My skis and snowboard are there all the time. There isn't much room at all in this place. I want to tune my equipment myself but don't know where I would set up a vise.

I have a kitchen table and a wooden coffee table. Coffee table is only 1 foot off the ground. I also have a deck. Not sure if I can secure a vise to the deck railing, but it would be cold.

Anyway.. I'm trying to figure out where I could possibly tune my skis. Does anyone make a pair of vises that sit on top of a table without damaging it? (weighted or suction or something?). Maybe I could put a towel or something on my kitchen table and do it there?

I'm a newbie at tuning (except for poor attempts at tuning back when I was 12). I'd like to be able to sharpen/adjust my edges and hot wax. I have a couple of pairs of skis, a snowboard, and some kids skis.

Anyone have any ideas?
post #2 of 22
I don't bring a vice and just put my skis on the counter and hold them down. I dont' hot wax, I rub on the wax and use Ray's ways wax whizard to rub it in. I bring diamond stones and brake retainers and just hold the skis down.
post #3 of 22
Go to a tuning party. Several places in Boulder offer Thursday night tuning classes for free. Bring your board or skis and they provide everything else. They show you how to do it. Check the Boulder Daily Camera. I'm sure they are offered in south Denver Metro area too.
post #4 of 22
I tune my skis in my dorm room without a vise. It would be nice to have one, but it's not really necessary. I just put an old towel down on the carpet and kneel down.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
Go to a tuning party. Several places in Boulder offer Thursday night tuning classes for free. Bring your board or skis and they provide everything else. They show you how to do it. Check the Boulder Daily Camera. I'm sure they are offered in south Denver Metro area too.
The condo is up in Silverthorne. I don't really want to bring them down the mountain just to tune them. I'm really looking for advice on where to tune them within my condo, if its even possible.
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdman829 View Post
I tune my skis in my dorm room without a vise. It would be nice to have one, but it's not really necessary. I just put an old towel down on the carpet and kneel down.
Do you hot wax and tune the edges on the floor?
post #7 of 22
You can set up blocks, books, boots, whatever to support ski ends. A cheap way to secure any board to a table or counter with a lip is to use a lasso clamp. Otherwise, a portable and foldable stand like the Terminator works very well, especially with the Cinch combo.
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulman1 View Post
Do you hot wax and tune the edges on the floor?
Yep, I actually did a bit of tuning and waxing tonight. Scraping the wax can be a a bit of a bear but it's doable. Obviously I would like to have a table and vises but do to space and money limitations I have to make do.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
Go to a tuning party. Several places in Boulder offer Thursday night tuning classes for free. Bring your board or skis and they provide everything else. They show you how to do it. Check the Boulder Daily Camera. I'm sure they are offered in south Denver Metro area too.
I am in the Golden area and also new to owning ski's. I would like to learn more about tuning and waxing, where would I look for a free tuning class?
post #10 of 22
reliable racing and race place have portable benches which I've used in our condo for a long time.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Yep, I actually did a bit of tuning and waxing tonight. Scraping the wax can be a a bit of a bear but it's doable. Obviously I would like to have a table and vises but do to space and money limitations I have to make do.
My son had a race on Sunday after training on Saturday. We were staying local to the hills Saturday night.

I was in a hotel room and was able to do the minimal (no) scrape wax job by rubbing the wax onto the base then ironing. Repeat as desired to build up, then brush down the base.

To do the edges, I just strapped the brakes and the ski sat flat on bindings on the floor.

If you can, I would recommend a portable waxing table. There are some pretty sophisticated ones out there with racks to hold multiple pairs of skis.
post #12 of 22
Depending on how many skis you are tuning, someone recently posted a home made wooden contraption.

Essentially, it was an elevated wooden "boot sole" to snap down on the binding. You could make a scaled down rig like that secured to a section of 2X10 and just spread an old sheet on the floor to catch filing and wax scrapings .... probaby store it propped in a corner or closet.
post #13 of 22
You can clamp vises to an ordinary table (or, for that matter, a counter) without damaging it. Just put something (like a piece of wood) in between the clamp and the table.

The biggest problem isn't that so much as the mess. Wax sometimes drips. Scraping produces, well, scrapings. Filing your edges produces (strangely enough) filings. On the other hand, using a stone on the edges is fairly clean.

I have waxed and scraped skis in a hotel bathroom (so as to keep stuff off the carpet) more than once, but it's not something I'd feel really happy about doing on a regular basis.
post #14 of 22
several phone books stacked up to support the ends will do great for just waxing. Barnes taught me a new trick. (probably an old one for him) Apply wax by touching the bar to the iron and crayon it on to the base. Then spread with the iron as normal. This seems to use less wax than the normal drip and spread method.

Then take sturdy paper towel, like those blue shop Paper towels. You can cut them in half. Then put the paper towel under the iron and slowly drag the iron with the paper towel across the bottom. (you may have to turn up the heat a little more). The paper towel will remove almost all the surface wax and doesn't seem to pull out the wax from the base. I tried this all week with different waxes and different skis. It does not quite feel as fast on the snow as a good hot wax, scrape, and brush but it feels close. No headache of scraping and brushing. No cleaning up the scrapings and brushing dust. and faster..
DC
post #15 of 22
A brown paper bag or fiberlene also works well for this method. Did you scrape and brush afterwards? I'll bet with a few extra minutes of minor scraping and brushing you'll get a better glide.

When using minimal wax like crayoning, and then ironing, using a piece of teflon protects the base while helping with the iron gliding down the ski, spreading the wax.
post #16 of 22
I do my waxing in the Silverthorne condo as well. Here is how I do it (of course this method is for the recreational skies waxing, I am sure that the races have to go through all the steps which are described in other threads) and it does a pretty good job for me.

I usually apply wax not directly to the base, but use a good quality paper towel and drip the wax on it. Then I press the paper to the base with the iron and slide it. This way I can make the iron a little bit hotter without the risk of burning the bases. The extra wax never drips on the floor since it is absorbed by the paper towel so it's a cleaner job this way. It also cleans the base better since the dirt ends up being captured on the paper. It takes less wax as well. If you try it you'll see that the wax is spread quite evenly and there is not much left to scrape off. In fact, if you control how much wax you are dripping on the towel (and you can add a little bit wax on top of the towel as needed) you don't need to scrape after waxing.
post #17 of 22
I'm in a small condo also.

I got a tuning bench from Racewax.com. It was part of a bench, vice and iron package deal. Table is portable so it is easy to store. But I just leave it setup. It give us another place to store things that the kids cannot reach.

The waxing is just for recreational skiing. To cut down on the mess w/ scraping and brushing, I just is the fiberlene paper method. I go through lots of paper but it is quicker and it is very neat.

pic at Condo:




At home I just use the dining room table.


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525x525px-LL-vbattach1253.jpg
post #18 of 22
does anybody scrape at the resort? I hate shavings in the house, so I just stradle and scrape/brush in the parking lot.

I too have a small place and just tune on the floor. With nice, clean tools, loads of leverage isn't needed, imo.
post #19 of 22
What I have found works best to avoid the mess on the floor is to use a shower curtain liner (about $3-4 usually if you don't have an old one). Decent size ((6' x 3') and easy to roll up and shake outside to get rid of the scrapings. Use 2 for speed skis!!

As i am living in a condo at the moment I also use these under my tuning bench on the deck to reduce the mess.

When on the road i have found that in a lot of motels you can fix vises to the vanity countertop which makes an excellent bench substitute . Easier than carrying the bench around!
post #20 of 22
Then there are liquid and spray waxes, requiring little if any scraping. You can also get by with little time, without ironing and just some brushing. The aforementioned Lasso Clamp, shown in post #17 is highly versatile and portable. It comes with the T4B Cordloc, Cinch and other branded vises, or can be used by itself with things like phone books, etc for a quick and easy anchor if you prefer.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
A brown paper bag or fiberlene also works well for this method. Did you scrape and brush afterwards? I'll bet with a few extra minutes of minor scraping and brushing you'll get a better glide.

When using minimal wax like crayoning, and then ironing, using a piece of teflon protects the base while helping with the iron gliding down the ski, spreading the wax.
If I'm going to race or need to go fast, I'll scrape and/or brush afterwards. If it's just a daily touch-up to keep the bases in shape, I will probably not scrape or brush. So far it seems to be working great.

DC
post #22 of 22
When I was in the dorms I used the love seat in the lounge with a tarp thrown over it. The arms at either end supported skis as short as ~165 and left plenty of clearance height-wise for the bindings.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Where to tune skis/snowboard in a very small condo